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PAST AND PRESENT 

OF 

KNOX COUNTY 

OHIO 



ALBERT B. WILLIAMS 




Editor.in.Chie( 




ILLUSTRATED 






:'•::.• ' 




:*** 




J 


VOL II 


c • » ' 


1912 




B. F. BOWEN & COMPANY 




INDIANAPOLIS. INDIANA 






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• • • -» 



••• • • •-, 

• • * • • « , 

• > • •• 



THE NEW YORK 
[PUBLIC LIBRARY 

707478 

ASrOR, LENOX A>»0 



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CONTENTS 



CHAPTER I— ORGANIZATION OF OHIO TERRITORY AND STATE 25 

Early Surveya— Virginia Military Reservation— Western Reserve— United States 
Military Lands— Refugee Lands— Acts of Congress— Ohio Made a State— 
Boundary Survey of 1812. 

CHAPTER II— INDIAN OCCUPANCY, TREATIES, ETC. 29 

After the Mound Builders^ the Indians— Tribes of Ohio— Treaty of 1785 — Origin 
of the Delawares — Indians Trading at Mt. Vernon — Killing of an Indian 
Squaw — Indian Treaties. 

CHAPTER III -NATURAL FEATURES 84 

Boundary of Knox County — Glacial Channels — G^eology — ^Timber — Prospecting 
— ^Neff Petroleum Company — ^Mound Builders— Mysterious Wells — Streams — 
Area. 

CHAPTER IV— ORGANIZATION OF KNOX COUNTY 44 

The Organizing Act— First Election — First C6unty Officers— Original Knox 
County Territory — Townships Detached — Organization of Morrow County — 
Bloomfitid Township — Franklin Township — The County Seat Contest — Some 
Funny Incidents. 

CHAPTER V— EARLY SETTLEMENT 52 

First Settlers in the Various Townships— Advent of the Whites— James Smith 
— ^Method of Indian Adoption— Indian Captives— Andrew Craig, the First White 
Settler — Historian Norton's Account — Quakers Come In. 

CHAPTER VI— PIONEER MANNERS AND CUSTOMS 58 

Origin of the Pioneers — Early Methods of Cooking— Pioneers and Rye Whisky 
— Early Superstitions — What Men and Women Wore — How the Pioneer Women 
Dressed— Pioneer Houses — Household Furniture — Hunting In Knox County — 
Wolf Traps— Great Occasions. 

CHAPTER VII— THE COUNTY GOVERNMENT 70 

Meetings of County Commissioners — ^Another County Government — Commission- 
ers' Records — Public Buildings — Court Houses— County Jails — County Infirm- 
ary — Finances of Knox County — Financial Statement in 1911. 

CHAPTER VIII— COUNTY, STATE AND NATIONAL REPRESENTATION 88 

Governors — Congressmen— State Senators— State Representatives— Presidential 
Electors — County Recorders — Clerks of the Court — County Auditors — County 
Treasurers — Sheriffs— Prosecuting Attorneys— Knox County Commissioners — 
County Infirmary Directors — County Surveyors— District Judges — Probate 
Judges — ^Associate Judges. 

CHAPTER IX— AGRICULTURE, HORTICULTURE AND COUNTY FAIRS 93 

Importance of Agriculture — Pioneer Farming Methods — ^Horticulture — Farm 
Products in 1910— Fair of 1878— Agricultural Societies— Morris Agricultural 
Club — Knox County Agricultural Society — Teaching Agriculture. 



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CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER X— RAILROADS, TRANSPORTATION AND TELEGRAPHS 1(« 

Early Day Principal Towns — Early Railroad Systema— A Wooden Railroad — 
Present Railroads In the Connty— Telegraph Oompanie&— Express Companies. 

CHAPTER XI— EDUCATIONAL INTERESTS OP THE COUNTY 109 

Early Schools Inferior — Spelling Schools — First School Houses In the County — 
First Teachers — Establishment of Graded Schools — Westminster Academy — ^Mt. 
Vernon College — Public Schools of Mt. Vernon — Schools in General — High 
Schools of the County — Books in Libraries— Colleges and Parochial Schools. 

CilAl^TER XII— HISTORY OF KENYON COLLEGE 122 

Incorporation — ^Philander Chase, the Founder of the College — ^The Founding — 
Bishop Chase's Trip to England — ^English Donor&— Erection of the College, a 
Gigantic Task— The College History from 1831 to 1912— Literary Societies- 
Property, 1911 — Distinctive Features— Harcourt Place School. 

CHAI^TER XIII— NEWSPAPERS OF THE COUNTY 140 

Knox County Journalism— Ohio Register — Knox County Gazette — Western 
Watchman — ^Family Cabinet — ^Democrat and Knox Advertiser — Looking Glass 
and Whig Reflector — Knox County Republican — ^Dally Republican-News — ^Demo- 
cratic Banner — Western Home Visitor — Knox Cdunty Express — Knox County 
Advocate — Knox County National — Centerburg Gazette — Knox County Herald 
— Trl-County Leader — Universal 1st Advocate — Centerburg Mirror — Frederick- 
town Independent — The Free Press — Literary Work. 

CHAPTER XIV— CHURCHES OF KNOX COUNTY 147 

Presbyterian Church — United Presbyterian Church— Free Presbyterian Church 
— Methodist Episcopal Church — Methodist Protestant Churches— Wesleyan 
Methodists — Free Methodists— African Methodists — Baptist Churches — Colored 
Baptist Church — Free- Will Baptist Church — United Brethren Church — German 
Evangelical Churches — Lutheran Churches — Universal 1st Churches — Seventh- 
day Adventlsts— Society of Friends — ^Unlon Churches— Congregational Churches 
— Roman Catholic Churches— St Vincent de Paul School — Catholic Cemeteries 
— Church of Christ (Disciples) — Brethren Churches — Protestant Episcopal 
Church. 

CHAPTER XV— CIVIC SOCIETIES 198 

Free and Accepted Masons — Mt. Zion Lodge No. 9 — Thrall Lodge No. 170 — 
Antioch Lodge No. 286— Danville Lodge No. 456 — Bloomfleld Lodge No. 422— 
Clinton Chapter No. 26, R. A. M.— Kinsman Council No. 76, R. & S. M.— Clinton 
Commandery No. 5, K. T. — ^Masonic Club — Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
— Mt. Vernon Lodge No. 20— Qulndaro Lodge No. 316 — Kokoslng Encampment 
No. 38— Centerburg Lodge No. 666— Sycamore Valley Lodge No. 553— Elllcott 
Lodge No. 267 — Knox Encampment No. 211— Bartholo liOdge No. 692— Brlnk- 
hav«i Lodge No. 905— Owl Creek Lodge No. 686— Kokoslng Lodge No. 807— 
Knights of Pythias— Timon Lodge No. 45 — ^Wayne Lodge No. 303 — Colfax 
Lodge No. 688— Hawthorne Lodge No. 228— Kokoslng Canton No. 71, U. R.— 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks— Mt. Vernon Lodge No. 140. 

CHAPTER XVI— MILITARY HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 208 

War of 1812 — Soldiers Rendezvous at Mt. Vernon— Erection of Block Houses — 
General Harrison's Famous Speech — ^The Texas and Mexican Wars— War Meet- 
ings at Mt Vernon— The "Young Guards"— Wartime Incidents— Reunion of 
Mexican-War Veterans— The Muster Rolls— Knox County in the Civil War- 



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CONTENTS. 

Mass Meetings— Resolutions Passed and Ck>mmlttee8 Appointed — Soldiers' 
Bounties — liO dies' Aid and Sanitary Commission Societies — Early Civil War 
Incidents — Regiments in Which Knox County Men Served — ^A Touching Letter 
— The "Squirrel Hunters" — In Memoriam — Soldiers' Monument — Grand Army 
of the Republic— The Spanish-American War. 

rjiAPTER XVII— THE BENCH AND BAR OF KNOX COUNTY 236 

Dignity and Usefulness of the Legal Profession — Notable Men Contributed by 
the Bar of Knox County — ^The First Court in Knox County — First Grand Jury 
—First Petit Jury— First Jury Trial— First and Last Public Whipping— Early 
Judges — First Resident Lawyers — Columbus Delano — Lawyers of 1880 — ^Active 
Members of the Bar in 1911. 

CHAPTER XVIII— PHYSICIANS OF KNOX COUNTY 250 

Doctors Early in the Field — Wonderful Advance in the Science of Medicine — 
Doctor Hilliar, the First Practicing Physician in Knox County — Other Early 
Doctors — Those of a Later Period — Present Physicians of the County — Knox 
County Medical Society — Hospitals of Mt. Vernon — Mt. Vernon Hospital-Sani- 
tarium — Mt. Vernon Medical and Surgical Sanitarium. 

CHAPTER XLX— BANKS AND BANKING 260 

Early Scarcity of Money — Owl Creek Bank — ^A Bank Without a Charter — 
Resulting Failure — Knox County National Bank — First National Bank of Mt 
Vernon — Knox County Savings Bank — Commercial and Savings Bank Company, 
Buckeye City— Danville Bank— First National Bank, Centerburg— Howard 
Savings Bank — Centerburg Savings Bank — First National Bank of Frederick- 
town — Building and Loan Associations — Cwiterburg Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation — Knox Building and Loan Company — Home Building and Loan Com- 
pany — Citizens Building, Loan and Savings Association. 

CHAPTER XX— CITY OF MOUNT VERNON 268 

Mt Vernon as the County Seat — Early Surroundings — Early Improvements at 
Mt. Vernon — Chief Armstrong — Early Taverns — First Illuminating Gas — Post- 
office — City Platted and Filed for Record — Comparative Statistics — Changes in 
Natural Features — Postofflce History — Municipal History — Mayors and Mar- 
shals of Mt. Vernon — ^Water Works — Paving — Population of the City — Street 
Railway — Electric Lighting Plant — Mound View Cemetery — Literary Soeletlep 
— ^Thespian Society — Mt. Vernon Literary Society — Mt Vernon Lyceum — Public 
Library — Home for the Aged— Young Men's Christian Association — Knox 
County Mutual Insurance Company — Eagle Mutual Fire Insurance Company — 
Ohio Mutual Aid Association— Business Men of Sixty Years Ago — Manufac- 
turing Industries — C. & G. Cooper Company — Cooper Manufacturing Company 
— Mt Vernon Bridge Company — Reeves Engine Company — Industries in 1911. 

CHAPTER XXI— TOWNSHIP HISTORIES 202 

Original Civil Subdivisions — Date of Organization and Area of Present Townships 
— Brown Township — Natural Features — First Settlement — ^Early Settlers — 
Jelloway — First Mills— Jelloway Mutual Life Insurance Company — Population. 

CHAPTER XXII— BUTLER TOWNSHIP 296 

The Soil — Former Timber Conditions — Minerals— Pioneer Settlements — Signs 
of Former Indian Occupancy — Pioneer Features Preserved — First Settlers — 
Early Distilleries— "Johnny Appleseed" — Griffin Mill— Owl Creek Postofflce— 
Population. 



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CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER XXIII—BERLIN TOWNSHIP 301 

Organization and First EUection — Geographical Featares— Early Fiorests — First 
Settlem«it by White Men— Shaler's MiUs— Village of Palmyra— VUlage of 
Ankenytown — Population— PostofRce at Shaler's Mill& 

CHAPTER XXIV— CLAY TOWNSHIP 306 

Location and Name — Surface — First Settler — Other Picmeers— Population — 
Martinsburg Village — ^Postofflce History — Business Interests — Churches — Physl-- 
cian& 

CHAPTER XXV— CLINTON TOWNSHIP 309 

One of the Original Townships— Boundary — First Settlement — ^Andrew Craig — 
Other Early Settlers— Population — Clinton Township Tragedies— An Incidait 
of the Slavery Period — Religiously Insane— An Indian Murder. 

CHAPTER XXVI— COLLEGE TOWNSHIP 318 

A Peculiar Subdivision — Originally a Dense Forest — Fertile Valley Lands — 
Bishop Chase and Kenyon College — Organization of the Townsliip — Village of 
Gambler— A College Town — ^Postofflce — ^Newspapers— Religious History — Popu- 
lation-Business Interests. 

CHAPTER XXVII— IL\RRISON TOWNSHIP 316 

Organization — Boundary — Population — Natural Features— Former Indian Occu- 
pancy — First Permanent White Settlers— Burlington Wind Storm— First Events 
—Wolfe's Postofflce. 

CHAPTER XXVIII— HOWARD TOWNSHIP 320 

Formation of Township — Location — Natural Features — Streams — Indian Field 
— Tom Jelloway — Early Hunters — Early Settlers — Distilleries in the Township 
— Village of Howard — Postofflce — Presait Business Interests — Mills — School. 

CHAPTER XXIX— HILLIAR TOWNSHIP 326 

Creation of the Township — Change of Boundary Lines— Surface of the Land — 
Streams— Timber— First Settlement — First Road — Early-day Incidents— Early 
Agricultural Implements — First Elections — Mills — Population — ^Dr. Richard 
Hilliar — Village of Centerburg — Laying Out of the Town— Postofflce History — 
Incorporation History — Business Interests in 1911. 

CHAPTER XXX— JEFFERSON TOWNSHIP 331 

Organization of the Township — Name — Interesting Geological Scenery and 
Formations — Mohican River — ^Ancient Mounds and Fortifications — First Settle- 
ment — ^Village of Greersville. 

CHAPITER XXXI— JACKSON TOWNSHIP 334 

Name — Organization — Minerals — Timber — Indian Relics — First Settlement — 
*'Johnny Appleseed"— Bladensburg— First Business Interests — Bladen£ft)urg in 
1911. 

CHAPTER XXXII— LIBERTY TOWNSHIP 340 

Organization — Boundary — Surface — Soil— Streams— Mound Builders — First Pio- 
neers—Early Hotels — Good Agricultural District — Village of Mt. Liberty — 
First Merchants — Business Interests in 1911— Village of Bangs. 

CHAPTER XXXIII— MILFORD TOWNSHIP 343 

Creation of the Township — ^Topography — Streams— Timber — Pioneer Settlers — 
Character of Early Settlers— Wolves — Railroads— Five Comers— Village of 
Lock — Population. 



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CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER XXXIV— MORGAN TOWNSHIP 348 

Location — Organization — Indian Mounds — ^An Agricultural District — Origin of 
Early Pioneers— First White Settler— Later Pioneers— Early Incidents— First 
Ev^ita 

CHAPTER XXXV— MONROE TOWNSHIP 361 

Creation — Name — Streams— Timber — Earliest Settlers — ^Milling Interests- 
Other Industries — Population of Township. 

CHAPTER XXXVI— MIDDLEBURY TOWNSHIP 354 

Creation and Location — ^Boundaries— Area — Settlement — ^The Friends^ or 
Quakers— Early Mills— Waterford — Postofflce — ^Township's Men of Note — Hon. 
Columbus Delano — Hon. William Windom. 

CHAPTER XXXVII— MILLER TOWNSHIP 360 

Formerly a Part of Morgan Township — "Sychamore" — ^A Novel Election — 
— S^[>aration of the Township — ^The Settl«nent — John Vance— Population of 
the Township — F-arly Hardships — Village of Brandon — Civil-war Enlistment in 
Miller Township. 

CHAPTER XXXVail— MORRIS TOWNSHIP 363 

Geographical Features— Ancient Mounds— The Township's Settlement— William 
Douglass— Other Early Settlers— Distilleries— Old Village of Clinton— Once a 
Contestant for the County Seat — Its Early Business Interests. 

CHAPTER XXXIX— PIKE TOWNSHIP 368 

Situation — Surface — Settlement of the Township — First Events — Village of 
Amity — Early Merchants — North Liberty — Postofflce — Democracy Postofflce. 

CHAPTER XL— PLEASANT TOWNSHIP 371 

Location and Name — Streams— Population — First Settlement— Distilleries — 
Mills — Nurseries. 

CHAPTER XLI— UNION TOWNSHIP 374 

Organization — Surface — Variety of Soil — Railroad — Settlement— First Things 
— ^Villages of the Township — ^Danville — Incorporation and Mayors— Preswit 
Offlcers— Chur<dies — Schools— Present Business Interests— Millwood — Rossville 
— ^Buckeye City — Its Laying Out— Incorporation — Present Municipal Offlcers— 
Postofflce — Cavallo — Brinkhaven (Gann) — Incorporation — Present Offlcers — 
Mayors and Clerks — Business Directory. 

CHAl^TER XLII— WAYNE TOWNSHIP 381 

Its Creation — Population — Name — Natural Features — Streams — Early Settle- 
ment — Green Valley — Jersey Settlement— Fredericktown— Population— Platting 
—First Stores— First Events in the Village— First Events— The Block-house— 
Incorporation — Mayors — Water Works— Business Directory of 1911 — Postofflce 
History. 

CHAPTER XLIII— MISCELLANEOUS SUBJECTS 391 

Population of Ohio — Knox County's Population from 1800— Detailed U. S. Cen- 
sus Report of Knox County — Village Plats in Knox County — The Ohio Sani- 
torlum — ^First Mill in Knox County — Postoffices of Knox County, 1911 — Old 
Style Apprenticeship— Violent Storms— Judge William H. West, "Blind Man 
Eloquent" — John Chapman, "Johnny Appleseed" — Daniel Decatur Emmett, 
Author of "Dixie." 



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HISTORICAL INDEX 



▲ 

Acts of OongreBS 26, 27 

AdT6Qt of Quakers 68 

Advent of the Wliites 68 

African Methodists 160 

Agricultural Societies 07 

Agriculture 94 

A Legal Whipping 288 

Amity 869 

Amity Baptist Ohurch 178 

Ankenytown 803 

Another (bounty €k>yemmmit 71 

Antioch Lodge No. 286, F. & A. M... 200 

Area of Knox County 42 

Associate Judges 98 

A Touching Letter 227 

Auditors 86 

B 

Banks 342 

Banks and Banking 260 

Baptist Churches 170 

Bar of Knox County 236 

Bartholo Lodge No. 692, I. O. O. F.. 204 

B^di and Bar 236 

B. P. O. E. . 207 

Berlin Township . 301 

Beulah M. P. Church 168 

Bladensburg . 337 

"Blind Man Eloquent" 399 

Bloomfleld Lodge No. 422, F. & A. M. 200 

Bloomfield Township 47 

Boundaries of Knox County 34 

Boundary Survey of 1812 28 

Bounties 221 

Brandon 362 

Brandon M. B. Church 157 

Brethren Churches 188 

Brinkhaven 379 

Brinkhaven Lodge No. 905, I. O. O. F. 2a^> 

Brinkhaven M. B. Church 158 

Brown Township 293 



Buckeye aty 878 

Building and Loan Associations 266 

Buildings, Public 74 

Business Men of 1860 286 

Butler Township 296 

O 

Captives, Indian 68 

Catholic Cemeteries 183 

Catholic Churches 179 

Cttisus Report on Knox Cbunty 391 

Centerburg 828 

Centerburg Building and Loan Assn. 260 

Centerburg Gazette 18 

Centerburg Lodge No. 666, I. O. O. F. 204 

Centerburg M. E. Church 166 

Centerburg Presbyterian Church 161 

Centerburg Savings Bank 266 

Chapman, John 400 

Chase, Philander 128 

Chief Killbuck 81 

tJhurch of Christ 184 

Churches of Knox County 147 

Citizens Bldg., Ln. and Sav. Assn — 267 

City of Mt Vernon 268 

Civic Societies 198 

Civil War 218 

Civil War Incidents - 223 

Clay Township ^05 

Clerks of the Court 86 

Clinton 365 

Clinton Chapter No. 26, R. A. M 201 

Clinton Commandery No. 5, K. T 202 

Clinton-Mt. Vernon Contest 49 

Clinton Township 309 

Clinton Township Tragedies 311 

Colfax. Lodge No. 688, K. P. 206 

College Township 313 

Colleges 121 

Colored Baptists 173 

Commercial and Savings Bank Co. — 264 
Commissioners, County 89 



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HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Commissioners, First Meetings 70 

Commissicmers' Records 72 

Congregational diarcbes 177 

Congressional Acts 26, 27 

CcAgressmoi 84 

County Auditors 1 88 

County Commissioners ..i r 89 

County Finances 82- 

County 6ovemm«it 70 

County Inflrmary 80 

County Jails 78 

County Officers - 83 

County Officers, First 45 

County^ Recorders 85 

County Seat Contest 49 

County Seat Located 48 

County Seat Organised 48 

County Sheriffs 87 

County Surveyors — 91 

County Treasurers 87 

Court House Destroyed 77 

Court House, First 74 

Court House, Present 78 

Court House, Second 74 

Court House, Third 76 

Craig, Andrew 66, 309 

D 

Daily Republican-News 148 

Danville 376 

Danville Bank 264 

Danville Catholic Church 183 

Danville Lodge No. 456, F. & A. M— 200 

Delano, Columbus 241 

Delawares, Origin of 80 

Democratic Banner 143 

Destruction of Court House 77 

Disciples Church 184 

Distilleries 322 

District Judges 92 

Doctors, Early 260 

B 

Early Business Men 285 

Early Farm Machinery 94 

Early Furniture 66 

Early Improvements, Mt. Vernon 270 

Early Population _ 58 

Early Railroads 103 

Early Schools 109 



Early Settlement 52 

Early Superstitions 62 

Early Surveys 25 

Early Teachers 111 

Early Wearing Apparel 62 

Ebenezer M. P. Church 168 

Educational Interests 109 

Eighte«ith U. S. Regulars 280 

Election, First . 45 

Electors, Presidential 85 

Ellcs -^ ^:a-r— ^ 207 

EUicot Lodge No. 267, I. O. O. F. 204 

Emmett, Daniel . Pecatur 408 

Episcopal Church 190 

Express Companies 107 

F 

Fair of 1878 96 

Farm Products 96 

Finances of Knox County 82 

Financial Statement, 1911 82 

First County Officers 45 

First Court House 74 

First Court in Knox County 286 

First Election 45 

First Election Results 46 

First Grand Jury 286 

First Jury Trial 288 

First Meeting of Commissioners 70 

First Mill in Knox County 395 

First National Bank 263 

First National Bank, Centerburg. 265 

First National Bank, Fredericktown.. 265 

First Permanent Settlement 56 

First Petit Jury 237 

First Resident Lawyers 240 

First School Houses 113 

First Settlers 52 

First Settiers, Origin of 55 

First White Settier 55 

First White Visitor 53 

Five Comers 346 

Forty-third Ohio Regiment 226 

Fourth Court House 78 

Franklin Township 48 

Fredericktown 384 

Fredericktown Baptist Church 171 

Fredericktown Ind^;)aident 146 

Fredericktown M. E. Church 161 

Free and Accepted Masons 108 



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HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Free Methodists 169 

Free Presbyterian CShurcb 152 

Free-Will Baptist Church 178 

Friends, Society of 176 

Friendship M. P. Church 168 

G 

Gambler 814 

Gambler M. E. Church 158 

Gen. Harrison's Famous Speech 210 

Geological Description 84 

German Bvangelical Churches 174 

•*God's Bam" 151 

Governors 88 

Grand Army of the Republic 288 

Great Occasions 68 

Greersville 383 

H 

Harcourt Place School 138 

Harrison Township 316 

Hawthorne Lodge No. 228, K. P. 206 

High Schools of County 120 

HiUlar Township 325 

Home Building and Loan Company.. 267 
Home for the Aged 283 

Ho^itals of Mt. Vernon 258 

Household Furniture, Early 66 

Houses^ Pioneer 66 

Howard 823 

Howard Savings Bank 265 

Howard Township 320 

Hunting in Knox County 67 

I 

Incidents of Civil War 228 

Independent Order of Odd Fellows— 208 

Indian Adoption Ceremony 54 

Indian Captives 53 

Indian Murder 812 

Indian Occupancy 29 

Indian Squaw Killed 82 

Indian Trading 81 

Indian Tribes 29 

Industries in 1911 291 

Infirmary, County 80 

Infirmary Directors 90 

In Memoriam 232 

Insurance Companies 284 



J 

Jackson Township 884 

Jails 78 

Jefferson Township 881 

Jelloway 294 

Joe Hooker Post No. 21, G. A. R 288 

"Johnny Appleeeed" 95, 400 

Journalism 140 

Judges, Associate .« 98 

Judges, District 92 

Judges, Probate 92 

K 

Kenyon College 122 

Kenyon College, Distinctive Features 188 

Kenyon College Presidents 180 

Kenyon College Property 188 

KUlbuck, Chief 81 

Kinsman Council No. 76, R. & S. M 201 

Knights of Pythias 205 

Knox Building and Loan Company.. 267 

Knox County Agricultural Society 97 

Knox County, Area of 42 

Knox County Boundaries 84 

Knox County Finances 82 

Knox County Gazette 141 

Knox County Herald 145 

Knox County in Civil War 218 

Knox County Journalism 140 

Knox County Medical Society 257 

Knox County, Organization of 44 

Knox County National Bank 263 

Ejiox County, Natural Features 34 

Knox County, Population of 391 

Knox County Republican 142 

Ejiox County Savings Bank 264 

Knox County Streams 42 

Knox County Timber 87 

Knox Encampment No. 211, I. O. O. F. 204 
Kokosing Canton No. 71. U. R., K. P. 206 
Kokosing Encampment No. 38, I. O. 

O. F. 203 

Kokosing Lodge No. 807, I. O. O. F. 205 

L 

Ladies' Aid Societies 222 

Lawyers of 1880 247 

Lawyers of 1911 249 

I^egal Whipping 238 



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HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Liberty Township 339 

libraries 121 

Literary Societies 281 

Literary Work 146 

Location of County Seat 48 

Lock 346 

Lutheran Churches 174 

M 

Manufacturing Industries 286 

Marshals of Mt. Vernon 275 

Martinsburg 307 

Martinsburg M. E. Church 156 

Martinsburg Presbyterian Church — 150 

Masonic Club, Mt. Vernon 202 

Masonry in Knox County 198 

Mayors of Mt. Vernon 275 

Methodist Episcopal Church 152 

Methodist Protestant Churches 167 

Mexican War 212 

Middlebury Township •- — 354 

Milford Township 343 

Military History of Knox County— 208 

Mill, First, in Knox County 395 

Miller Township 359 

Millwood 377 

Miscellaneous Subjects 391 

Monroe Township 351 

Morgan Township 347 

Morris Agricultural Club 97 

Morris Township 364 

Morrow County Organized 47 

Mound Builders 30 

Mound View Cemetery 280 

Mt. Liberty 341 

Mt Vernon 268 

Mt. Vernon Baptist Church 170 

Mt. Vernon Catholic Church 179 

Mt. Vemon-Cllnton Contest 49 

Mt. Vernon Congregational Church. 177 

Mt Vernon College 116 

Mt. Vernon Ho^ltal Sanitarium 258 

Mt Vernon Lodge No. 20, I. O. O. F. 203 
Mt. Vernon Lodge No. 140, B. P. O. E. 207 
Mt. Vernon Medical and Surgical 

Sanitarium 250 

Mt Vernon M. B. Church 152 

Mt Vernon M. P. Church 167 

Mt Vernon Municipal History 274 

Mt Vernon, Population 279 



Mt Vernon Postofflce 272 

Mt. Vernon Presbyterian Church 147 

Mt Vernon Public Library- 282 

Mt Vernon Public Schools 116 

Mt Vernon Street Railway 280 

Mt Vernon Times 143 

Mt. Vernon Water Works 277 

Mt Zion Lodge No. 9, F. & A. M... 198 

Murder of Indian Squaw 32 

Muster Rolls 218 

Mysterious Wells 42 

N 

National Representation 84 

Natural Features of Knox County- 34 
Natural Gas 39 

Neff Petroleum Company 88 

Newspapers 140 

Ninety-sixth Ohio Regiment 227 

North Liberty 369 

O 

Odd Fellowship 203 

Officers, County 83 

Officers, First County 45 

OU Explorations 38 

Ohio Lodge No. 199, F. & A. M 201 

Ohio Made a State 27 

Ohio, Population of 391 

Ohio Register 140 

Ohio Sanltorlum 394 

Ohio Territory Organized 25 

Old-style Apprenticeship 397 

One Hundred Forty-second Home 

Guards 231 

One Hundred Twenty-fifth Ohio Reg. 229 
One Hundred Twenty-first Ohio Reg. 228 

Organization of County Seat 48 

Organization of Knox County 44 

Organization of Morrow County 47 

Organization of Ohio Territory 25 

Organization of Townships 292 

Original Territory 46 

Origin of First Settlers 55 

Origin of the Delawnres 30 

Other Railroads 105 

Owl Creek Bank 260 

Owl Creek Baptist Church 172 

Owl Creek Lodge No. 686, I. O. O. F. 205 



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HISTORICAL INDEX. 



P 

Palmyra 308 

Parish Schools 121 

Petroleum 88 

Physicians of Knox County 250 

Physicians, Present 257 

Pike Township 36« 

Pioneer Customs 59 

Pioneer Houses 66 

Pioneers and Whisky 61 

Pleasant Township 371 

Population, Early 58 

Population of Knox County 391 

Population of Mt Vernon 279 

Population of Ohio 391 

Postofflces of Knox County 397 

Preglacial Channels 34 

Presbyterian Church 147 

Present Court House 78 

Present Physicians 257 

Presidaitial Electors 85 

Probate Judges 92 

Prosecuting Attorneys 8S 

Prospecting and Results 38 

Protestant Episcopal Church 190 

Public Buildings 74 

Public Library, Mt. Vernon 282 

Q 

Quakers Come in 58 

Quindaro Lodge No. 316, I. O. O. F. 203 

Railroad, A Wooden 104 

Railroads, Early 103 

Recorders 85 

Refugee Lands 25 

Religiously Insane 311 

Results of First Election 45 

Roman Catholic Churches 179 

Rossville 37S 

S 

Sad Mistake 216 

St. Luke's Catholic Church 18S 

St. Paul's Episcopal Church 190 

St. Vincent de Paul Church 181 

St. Vincent de Paul School 182 

Sanitary Commission 222 

School Houses, First 113 

S?chools, Early 109 

Schools in General 120 



Schools of Mt Vernon 116 

Schools, Parochial 121 

Second Court House 74 

Second Heavy Artillery 230 

Senators, State . 84 

Settlement, Early 52 

Settlement, First Permanent 56 

Settler, First White 55 

Settlers, First 52 

Seventh-day Adventlsts 175 

Sheriffs 87 

Sixty-fifth Ohio Regiment 226 

Smith, James 53 

Society of Friends 176 

Soldiers' Bounties 221 

Soldiers' Monument 232 

Spanish-American War 234 

"Squirrel Hunters" 231 

State Representatives 84 

State Senators 84 

Storms 398 

Streams 42 

Superstitions, Early 62 

Survey, Boundary, of 1812 28 

Surveyors 91 

Surveys, Early 25 

Sycamore Valley Lodge No. 553, I. O. 
O. F. 204 

T 

Teachers, Early 111 

Teaching Agriculture 102 

Telegraph Companies IOC 

Texas War 212 

The Press 140 

The Young Guard 214 

Third Court House 76 

Thirtieth Ohio Reglmait 225 

Thirty-second Ohio Regiment 225 

Thrall Lodge No. 170, F. & A. M... 199 

Timber in Knox County 37 

Timon I^dge No. 45, K. P 205 

Topography 35 

Township Histories 292 

Townships Detached from Knox 47 

Treasurers, County 87 

Treaties of 1817 and 1829 33 

Treaty of 1785 29 

TrI-County Leader 145 

Twentieth Ohio Regiment 225 



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HISTORICAL INDEX. 



U 

Union Chardies 177 

Union Township 374 

United Brethren Ohnrches 174 

United Presbyterian Ohnrch 152 

United States MUitary Lands 25 

Universalis Adyocate 145 

Universalist Ohnrches 175 

V 

ViUage Plats 3»3 

Violent Storms 308 

Virginia Military Reservation 25 

W 

War Meetings 219 

War of 1812 208 



Waterford 367 

Wayne Baptist Ohnrch 173 

Wayne Lodge No. 808, K. P 206 

Wayne Township -. 381 

Wearing Apparel, Early 62 

Wesleyan Methodists 169 

West, Judge, William H. 399 

Western Reserve 25 

Western Watchman 142 

Westminster Academy 115 

Whisky and Pioneers 61 

Wolf Traps 68 

Wooden Railroad 104 

Y 
Yonng Men?s Ohristian AsaCn 288 



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BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



A 

Ackerman, Louis B. 715 

Ackley, Solon B. 621 

Alan, John S. 447 

Allen, George 857 

Allen, Henry A. 576 

Amos^ Frederick 867 

Amo8» John F. 86^> 

Anderson, Robert C. 830 

Amdt, George D. 454 

Amdt, John L. 454 

B 

Banbury, Harry C. 871 

Banbury, John 0. 872 

Barber, Clark M. 823 

Beach, Charles H. 866 

Beal, Joseph 49t) 

Beal, Michael 499 

Beam, Frank L. 826 

Beaty, John 655 

Beck, Charles A. — 653 

Beggs, Edward C. — 642 

Bell, J. Edward 807 

Bell, Lloyd M. 721 

Bennett, Frank L. 635 

Bennett, George W. 788 

Bermont, Charles L. 695 

Berry, Patrick A. 555 

Best, Sylvester R. 754 

Bishop, Allen S. 583 

Bishop, Charles L. 816 

Bishop, Clayton H. 582 

Bishop. Fred C. 815 

Blackburn, Charles W. 894 

Blue, Clem L. V. 734 

Blue, Hamilton 735 

Boggs, Coleman B. 516 

Bone. John H. 781 

Bottenfleld, John 507 

Bottenfleld, W. L. 507 



Bounds, William A. 05<i 

Braddock, Levi S 874 

Bradfield, Levi S. 751 

Breece, Adam G. 572 

Breece, Cassie 671 

Breece, Ellsworth W. 681 

Britton, Legrand 659 

Britton, Lewis 660 

Brown, Arthur W. 663 

Brown, Elmer J. 781 

Brown, James M. 891 

Brown, James S. , 892 

Brown, John 818 

Bryant, Jacob M. 626 

Bunn, Harry S. 634 

Burger, Jacob 468 

Burger, Levi S. 468 

Burgess, L. H. 806 

Busenburg, J. B. _. 861 

Butler, Wilson W. 577 

Buxton, William T. 877 

O 

Callihan, J. W. 868 

Campbell, Francis W. 512 

Carlisle, WUliam M. 592 

Carpenter, William N. 565 

Caywood, John 772 

Cnywood, Leander 772 

Cessna, John R. 489 

Cessna, John W. 865 

Cessna, Newton S. 865 

Cessna, William 490 

Chappelear, Herschel J. 600 

Clark, Samuel 840 

Claypool. John R. 581 

Clements, Christopher C. 570 

Clements, Rollin S. 670 

Clutter, David P. 736 

Cochran, Frank M. 691 

Cochran, John M. 829 



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BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Ck)e, Charles W. 598 

Colgln, James 480 

Collopy, Joseph H. 881 

CJolviUe, Charles F. 486 

Colwlll, John T. 8(H 

Colwill, Simon 805 

Conard, Charles K. 680 

Cooksey, Uriah T. 731 

Cooper, John 616 

Cooper, William C. 543 

Cover, Perry L». 488 

Cover, Upton A. 488 

Coyner, Re\'. David H. 442 

Coyner, George 441 

Critchfield, Charles E. 434 

Cromley, K Tate ^ 66( 

Crumley, Albert W. 6as 

Cunningham, John 702 

D 

wDavis, Alva B. 780 

Belong, Benjamin F. 854 

Belong, John sr»r> 

Bevin, Henry C. 742 

Bevin, Joseph C. 74:5 

Dial, Lee 62l> 

Dodd, Stephen B. 460 

Dowds, Alva A. . 640 

Dowds, Elijah W. 457 

Dowds, Sheridan G. 450 

Dudgeon, Chris. E. 464 

Dudgeon, Scott >^o;} 

Dudgeon, Timothy 464 

Durbln, Clement E. saa 

E 

Eastman, James W. 510 

TOastman, Newton R. 51*^^ 

Eley, Thurman U 616 

Elliott, James 660 

Elliott, Orange H. 66S 

Ewalt Henry 5S(i 

Ewalt, John M. 5S5 

Ewers, George J. 474 

F 

Farmer, Walter B. 733 

Farmer, Warren 806 

Ferenbaugh, Burchard B. 624 



Ferenbaugh, Leo 624 

Fish, Simon B. 611 

Flack, Samuel 767 

Frizzell, Isaiah H. 786 

O 

Gaines, Robert S. 472 

Gaines, Thomas B. 473 

Geitgey, Alverdo A, 902 

Giffin, Robert 624 

Gorsuch, William L. 812 

Gray, Charles M. 652 

Gray, George W. 531 

Gray, James E. 530 

Grubb, Charles M. 724 

Grubb, Henry 810 

H 

Hagan, Oliver C. 703 

Hamilton, Edwin F. 825 

Hamilton, George S. 513 

Hamilton, William 514 

Harmer, Isjiac S. 580 

Harper, Franklin 557 

Harper, liecky 557 

Harris, George A. 515 

Harris, Jesse 524 

Harris, John C. 524 

Harris, Osmer J. 504 

Harter, George S. 612 

Hayden, Charles D. 752 

Hayes, Charles W. 604 

Heiird, George H. 762 

Hickinbotham, John A. 483 

Hlldreth, Charles M. 714 

Hlldreth, Washington 784 

Ilollister, Elmer E. 466 

Holmes, Harry 506 

Hook, George E. 462 

Horn, Benton C. 740 

Horn, Joseph 735 

llosjick, William A. 600 

Tlonck, I^wis B. 677 

Howell, Edmund C. 500 

Howell, Hezokiah 500 

Hull, Rev. William E. 436 

Hunter, Archie D. 731 

Hunter, Richard 842 

Hunter, Ross E. 720 

Hyatt George W. 730 



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BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



I 

lams, Charles C. 449 

Israel, James 444 

Israel, Samuel 446 

Israel, Samuel H. 674 

J 

Jackson, Charles B. 505 

Jacksom, Edward 790 

Jackson, George 605 

Jackson, VanBaren 496 

Jackson, Will EL 495 

Jacobs, Henry M. 591 

Johnson, Isaac S. 880 

Johnson, James 653 

Johnson, Walter B. 552 

Jones, Goshom A. 439 

K 

Kerr, Scott D. 685 

Kirk, Desault B. 538 

Kirk, Robert C. 548 

L 

I^aPorte, George P. 601 

Larimore, Frank C. 545 

I^rimore, Isaac P. 795 

Larimore, Joseph M. : 794 

Larimore, Robert 546 

Lflyman, Stanley A. 869 

Leatherman, William T. 717 

Leedy, Abraham 853 

Leedy, Isaac 852 

Leedy, William H. 870 

I^eonard, James L. 700 

Lepley, Jacob 770 

Levering, Frank O. 450 

Levering, John Cook 452 

levering, Noah 452 

liewis, William 827 

Umbaugh, Edward C. 886 

Litzenberg, John E. 822 

LItzenberg, John 822 

Lloyd, John B. 741 

I^gsdon, Charles C. 602 

Loney, John 537 

Loney, John C. 537 

Ijoney, William C. 535 

Lytle, Mortlmor B. 706 



Mc 

McCamment, John S. 843 

McCormick, Joseph 615 

McGee, William 640 

Mclntire, Alfred R. 697 

Mclntire, Rollin R. 702 

McKinley, John L. 508 

McMannis, Curtis E. 622 

McMillan, Joseph . 779 

McNabb, George W. 758 

M 

Maban, Loran E. 478 

Marple, George L. 712 

Martin, George R. 906 

Martin, Milton P. 905 

May, William H. 759 

Meyers, Max 470 

Mild, William 638 

Miller, Irving C. 747 

Mi»er, J. E. 859 

Mitchell, Charles A. 563 

Mitchell, James W. S. 802 

Mitchell, John A. 563 

Mitchell, Rollin C. 609 

Mitchell, Torrence 481 

Mitchell, William 609 

Mitchell, William H. 783 

Mitchell, William M. 525 

Mizer, Alfred L. 851 

Mizer, John 851 

Mizer, Lloyd O. 850 

Moree, Cassius B. 689 

Morey, Corwin D. 465 

Motz, Gottlieb 49S 

Motz, John M. 497 

Mulhane, Rev. Lawrence W. 748 

N 

Neal, George D. 560 

Neal, Hugh 766 

Xeiderhauser, Robert 897 

Nicholls, Daniel 841 

Nixon, Isabelle B. 654 

Nixon, Michael 655 

O 

Oberholtzer, Dillman C. 719 

Owen, Frank V 756 



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BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



F 

Padgett, Frank O. 666 

Paige, Warren T. 803 

Parker, Peter J. - 692 

Parr, Silas 708 

Pelker, WUliam P. 883 

Penn, John 529 

Penn, Lawrence C. - 764 

Penn, William 528 

Pennell, William W. 431 

Pfouts, John J. 673 

Purdy, Elijah 476 

Purdy. Richard D. 476 

R 

Ransom, Oscar 814 

Reed, John A. 900 

Rice, Clinton M. 604 

Riley, James 527 

Riley, Walter C. 527 

Rine, Emannel 726 

Rine, Henry 727 

Rine, Rudolph 72S 

Robinson, William L. 684 

Rockwell, William C. 745 

Russell, John W. 619 

S 

St. Luke's Church, DanvUle 502 

Salisbury, Charles K. 676 

Sapp, Burgess E. 873 

Schooler, Clark 722 

Scott, Adam 522 

Scott, James 485 

Scott, James L. 485 

Scott, Lewis B. 522 

Semple, William F. 687 

Sevems, French W. 607 

Sevits, Irven 777 

Sevits, Stephen W. 627 

Shellenbarger, Charles B. 844 

Shellenbarger, Harry N. 848 

Shrontz, John F. 493 

Silcott, William A. G31 

Simmons, Amaziah H. 65S 

Simpson, James A. 573 

Singrey, Fred L. 534 

Sipe, Almanisa R. 644 

Smith, Homer C. .- 661 



Smith, John T. 458 

Smith, Joseph B. 459 

Snyder, William 860 

Sperry, George W. 500 

Sperry, Peter W. 501 

StUlwell. Francis M. 541 

StillweU, L. 0. 541 

Stinemetz, John B. 588 

Stltzlein, Adam :. 876 

Stonebrook, John B. - 709 

Stonehocker, John J. 521 

Stonehocker, W. W. 520 

Struble, David W. 632 

Struble, John D. 633 

Swartz, John W. 796 

Swetland, Clarence D. 469 

Syler, Harvey 817 

T 

Trogus, Rev. Otto P. 502 

Tulloss, Benjamin F. 847 

Tulloss, Charles R. 491 

Tulloss. Ernest C. 888 

Tulloss, George W. 837 

Tulloss, Richard S. 493 

Tulloss, William 492 

V 

Van Horn, Jasper 820 

Vannatta, Charles O. 802 

Vannatta, Samuel T. 800 

Vincent, Judson 647 

W 

Wagner, George P. 738 

Wagner, Henry 799 

Wagner, William H. 798 

Waight, John B. 438 

Ward, Joe M. 595 

Ward, John F. 879 

Ward, Rufus 879 

Ward, William L. 594 

Welker, Andrew D. 550 

Welker, William E. 551 

Welsh, William J. 761 

Wenger, Joseph 611 

Wheaton, Avery 899 

Williams, Hev. Albert B. 566 

Williams, Lester L. 637 



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BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 

WUaon, Hodgson 864 Y 

WilBon, Jobn M. „ 710 

Wlnterringer, Jesse B. 885 Young, Charles A. 775 

Wlnterringer, John C. 835 Young, Charles B, 832 

Wolfe, John 846 Young, Frank B. 776 

Woodruff, John F. 800 Young, Harry C. 532 

Workman, Hiram W. 500 Young, Silas 882 

Workman, Joseph — 672 

Workman, Lyman 671 Z 

Workman, Stephen 590 

Wyant, Burr A. 885 Zeig, Frank B. 574 



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l\\O0A' 'J'l.:- .\L 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



WILLIAM W. PENNELL, M. D. 

The man who devotes his talents and energies to the noble work of ad- 
ministering to the ills and alleviating the sufferings of humanity is pursuing 
a calling which, in dignity, importance and beneficial results, is second to no 
other. If true to his profession and earnest in his efforts to enlarge his 
sphere of usefulness, he is indeed a benefactor to his kind, for to him more 
than to any other man are entrusted the safety, the comfort, and, in many 
instances, the lives of those who place themselves under his care and profit 
by his services. Standing in the front rank of Knox county's professional 
man is Dr. William W. Pennell, of Mt. Vernon, who is not only held in 
high esteem for his professional ability, but for his public-spirited nature, 
his wholesome private and social life, and that he has become one of the 
influential citizens of the locality of which this history treats, although a 
comparative newcomer. 

Doctor Pennell, the third son of Hugh and Martha A. (Liggett) Pen- 
nell, was born at Benton, Holmes county, Ohio, February 2, 1853. His 
father was a native of Maryland, his mother of Pennsylvania, both being 
of English descent. These parents came to Ohio as young people, were 
married in Holmes county and there settled and spent the rest of their lives. 
Hugh Pennell was a harness manufacturer; politically, he strongly opposed 
the fugitive slave law by assisting to operate the "underground railroad," 
a matter which required some courage in his locality. He was the first Re- 
puMican postmaster appointed in Holmes county after the election of Presi- 
dent Lincoln. A man of strong convictions, he had the courage of advo- 
cating what he believed to be right, and this was the basis of his influence. 
He died in November, 1900, and his widow joined him in the Summerland 
in January, 1910. 

Doctor Pennell was reared in Holmes count}-, in the atmosphere of a 
Christian home, and w^as educated in the schools of his native county. He 
began life by teaching school, and, having an ambition to become a physician, 



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43^ KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

but penniless and already inured to frugality, he followed teaching while 
prosecuting his medical studies under the preceptorship of Dr. Isaac H. 
Hague, of Ntashville, with whom he remained four years, not hesitating to 
perform any service to further the fulfillment of his ambition. He received 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in February, 1875, ^^^m the medical 
department of the University of Wooster at Cleveland, and immediately 
associated himself with Doctor Hague in the practice of medicine at Nash- 
ville. In April, 1875, he married Melvina M. Williams, daughter of James 
and Mercy (Morgan) Williams, of Monroe township, Holmes county, and, 
in October, 1876, succeeded his preceptor at Nashville. In 1882 Adelbert 
College, of the Western Reserve, conferred on him the ad eundent degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. In 1884, after a post-graduate course in special studies 
at Philadelphia, he moved to Fredericktown, Knox county, where he re- 
mained in the successful practice of his profession until 1904, when, wishing 
to enlarge his sphere of work, he again pursued a post-graduate course on 
special lines, this time in New York, and then located at No. 205 North 
Main street. Mount Vernon. Here he has maintained his residence, busy 
with the affairs of his work. Although specializing in diseases of the eye, 
ear, nose and throat, it is demanded of him to do a vast amount of general 
practice. It is not too much to say that his professional reputation is wide- 
spread and his opinion sought and esteemed. By nature a student, it has been 
easy for him to keep abreast of the times in all that pertains to his vocation 
and allied subjects, and to preserve a full survey of matters in general. 

Doctor Pennell is a member of the Knox County Medical Society, serv- 
ing as temporary chairman during its present organization, and once its 
delegate to the Ohio State Medical Association ; a member and ex-first vice- 
president of the Ohio State Medical Association, member and ex-president 
Ohio State Pediatric Society, member of the Mississippi Valley Medical 
Association, the American Medical Association, the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science, and the American Association for the 
Prevention and Cure of Tuberculosis, and, in all, has presented some thirty 
acceptable and valuable papers to state and national societies in the past 
twenty-five years. A member of the first Pan-American Medical Congress, 
which met at Washington, D. C, in 1893, he was one of the delegates from 
the United States to the fifth congress, which met at Guatemala City, Guate- 
mala, Central America, in 1908, and presented an able paper before that 
body. 

The Doctor is a literary man of no mean ability, having a clear, force- 
ful style that grips his readers with the neat-rounded message he has to 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 433 

convey. Aside from his contributions to medical literature, he has written 
"Poetical Compositions/' a pleasing metrical volume, revealing that rhythm 
and poesy are in his essence ; "The Buckeye Doctor/' a tale of the struggles 
and final triumph of a young doctor in the earlier days of medicine in Ohio — 
racy, humorous, sincere, pathetic: **Jonas Hawley," a politico-social novel, 
abounding in references to historical conditions in Ohio during the Civil 
war, especially the Brough-Vallandigham campaign; "Dan,'- the romance 
of a nameless boy, his adventures, experiences, and triumphs, in vindicating 
his mother, is forthcoming and is awaited by a widening circle of admirers 
among whom the Doctor has become popular. Among his shorter produc- 
tions that have been published in the magazines are, "Not the King's Will," 
a story of the Babylonian captivity; "Mixing Medicine and Law,*' an epi- 
sode of medical practice which might be duplicated by scores of physicians, 
and "Sammy's Substitute," the story of a boy who was curiously rewarded 
for faithful service. 

A Presbyterian in religious belief. Doctor Pennell is, politically, a Re- 
publican; and, while he has always taken a good citizen's interest in public 
matters, he has never sought the emoluments of public office. Educational 
affairs appealed to him differently, however, for, while living at Frederick- 
town, he was elected to the board of education several successive terms. 
Here it pleased him to see the public schools rise to a high plane of useful- 
ness, and, for the ten years that he served as president of the board of edu- 
cation, gave his efforts to that end. Fraternally, he is a Mason. A member 
of Thrall Lodge No. 170, at Fredericktown, he served it as master for four 
years; of Clinton Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Kinsman Council, Royal and 
Select Masters, and Clinton Commandery, Knights Templar, at Mt. Vernon; 
of Aladdin Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nbbles of the Mystic Shrine; 
Columbus Chapter, Rose Croix H. R. D. M., eighteenth degree. Valley of 
Columbus; and of Ohio Sovereign Consistory, S. P. R. S., thirty-second de- 
gree, Cincinnati, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite. 

The Doctor has been twice married. To his first union two daughters 
and one son were bom, all at, Nashville : Edna E., now Sister Cecilia, Order 
of St. Anne, Arlington Heights, Massachusetts; Carroll Celsus died in in- 
fancy; Adah Aline, wife of J. Handel Williams, editor of the Republican- 
Record, Washington C. H., Ohio, who has presented her father with two 
grandsons and two grandaughters. The wife and mother passed to her 
rest in October, 1903, after a long period of sickness. In April, 1908, the 
Doctor was again married, uniting with Mrs. Emma J. Seiler, daughter of 
E. Casteel, late of Hayesville, Ohio. 



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434 KNOX CaUNTY, OHIO. 

Personally the Doctor is a genial^ high-minded, progressive and hon- 
orable gentleman whom it is a pleasure to meet; profound scholar, versatile 
writer, able physician and surgeon; an unassuming representative of the 
masses. The comfortable home of the Pennells, at No. 205 North Main 
street, presided over by the pleasing personality of the wife, contains all 
the elements of cheer and hospitality. 



JUDGE CHARLES E. CRITCHFIELD. 

Examples that impress force of character on all who study them are 
worthy of record. By a few general observations may be conveyed some 
idea of the high standing of Judge Charles E. Critchfield, of Mt. Vernon, 
as an attorney, a man of affairs and a citizen and public benefactor. United 
in his composition are so many elements of a solid and practical nature, 
which during a series of many decades have brought him into prominent 
notice and earned for him a conspicuous place among the enterprising and 
scholarly men of the county honored by his residence, that it is but just 
recognition of his worth to speak at some length of his life and achieve- 
ments, although he is conservative and unpretentious, caring little for the 
admiring plaudits of men, satisfied if he is conscious of doing his duty well 
in the several relations of life. 

Judge Critchfield is the scion of a sterling old pioneer family and he 
himself may be referred to as a connecting link between the pioneer epoch 
and the present, having spent his long, active and useful life in this locality 
whose interests he has ever had at heart and which he has ever sought to 
promulgate, playing an important role in the drama of civilization. He was 
bom in Coshocton county, Ohio, near the Knox county line, on November 
25, 1836, and he is the son of Charles and Matilda (Butler) Critchfield. The 
great-grandfather of the subject, who was of German lineage, fought in the 
Revolutionary war. The grandfather, William Critchfield, was born in 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, from which he emigrated to Knox county, 
Ohio, in 181 2 when this section was but a forest wilderness and yet the 
haunts of wild beasts and the home of the red man. He was an honored and 
influential pioneer and aided materially in laying the foundation for the pros- 
perity and civilization that was to follow. Charles Critchfield, father of the 
Judge, was also born in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, and he emigrated 
to Knox county, Ohio, with his parents in 18 12, later moving to Coshocton 
county, where his son, Charles E., of this review, was born. Twelve years 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 435 

later he returned with his family to Knox county and located upon a farm 
which is still in possession of his descendants. He followed farming on a 
large scale during the active years of his life, and was widely known as an 
enterprising agriculturist and honorable citizen. His wife, Matilda Butler, 
was the daughter of Benjamin Butler, who came from Virginia to Ohio, 
and who, with Joseph Walker and Thomas Bell Patterson, at one time 
owned the site of Mt. Vernon, and who laid out the town here in 1805. So 
on both the paternal and maternal sides of the house, Judge Critchfield is a 
representative of worthy pioneer stock, intimately identified with the history 
of the city and county from its earliest days, and he has ever striven to keep 
untarnished the bright escutcheon of an honored family name. 

The literary education of Charles E. Critchfield was obtained in the 
home schools, as already intimated, and while he did not enjoy so extensive 
advantages of many of the present day, he made the most of every oppor- 
tunity and laid a broad and secure foundation for the subsequent structure. 
When a young man he began reading law in the office of Major William R. 
Sapp, of Mt. Vernon, and in 1865 he was admitted to the bar and opened an 
office in Mt. Vernon, and with the exception of the years when he was in 
official positions he has practiced here ever since, covering a period of forty- 
six years, which have been replete with honor and a very high degree of 
success such as few attain and none of his contemporaries have surpassed. 
It was not his nature to occupy any mediocre position, but his ambition was 
to excel and, with "his wagon hitched to a star," he has ever striven for the 
highest and best. By thorough preparation, profound study and research 
and absolute devotion to his calling and the cause of his clients, he early in 
his career won an envied place in his profession. He has followed a gen- 
eral practice in all the courts of the state and United States courts. In 1869 
he was elected probate judge of Knox county and served two consecutive 
terms of three years each and again after an interval of three years he w^as 
re-elected for a third term, thus serving nine years, in a manner that not 
only reflected much credit upon himself but also won the hearty approval of 
all concerned, irrespective of party alignment, and it is doubtful if the county 
ever had, before or since, a more able official in this capacity and one who 
discharged his duties with greater fidelity and alacrity. He has also filled 
other important public positions, always in a manner that proved the wis- 
dom of his selection. He has been a life-long Democrat and always loyal 
to the principles of the party. During President Cleveland's second admin- 
istration he served as postmaster at Mt. Vernon from 1893 to 1897. ^^ 
1889 he was elected representative from Knox county to the state Legisla- 



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436 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

ture and during his term participated in the election of Calvin S. Brice to 
the United States Senate. He won the admiration of his colleagues and the 
hearty approval of his constituents while in the House and added additional 
luster to an already distinguished name in the Buckeye state. 

Judge Critchfield was married in 1862 to Amanda Vincent, daughter of 
Alexander and Eliza (McElroy) Vincent, of Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania, who came to Ohio in an early day and located on a farm in Knox 
county, where they became well established and highly respected. Two 
children have been bom to the Judge and wife, Charles Vincent, manager of 
the Mt. Vernon electric light and power plant, and Nellie, the estimable 
daughter. 

Few men have a wider acquaintance and are more favorably known 
than Judge Critchfield. In this community, where his entire life has been 
spent, his high character, his marked ability, his sterling worth and his 
fidelity to duty in public life commands the consideration and high regard 
of his fellow men, which they have ever very freely accorded, honoring him 
as one of the notable men of his day and generation, as he justly deserves, in 
this section of Ohio. 



REV. WILLIAM E. HULL. 

Success is only achieved by the exercise of certain distinguishing quali- 
ties, and it can not be retained without effort. Those by whom great 
epoch changes have been made in the religious, political and business world 
began early in life to prepare themselves for their peculiar duties and re- 
sponsibilities and it was only by the most persevering and continuous en- 
deavor that they succeeded in rising superior to the obstacles in their way 
and reaching the goal of their ambition. Such lives are an inspiration to 
others who are less courageous and more prone to give up the fight before 
their ideal is reached or definite success in any chosen field has been attained. 
In the life history of Rev. William E. Hull, the able and popular pastor 
of St. Paul's Episcopal church, at Mt. Vernon, Ohio, we find evidence of 
a peculiar characteristic that always makes for achievement — persistency, 
coupled with fortitude and lofty traits, and as a result of his useful, con- 
sistent and unselfish life he is one of Knox county's most highly esteemed, 
influential and best known citizens, a man whom to know is to respect and 
admire, owing to his scholarly attainments, his faithfulness in his efforts 
to ameliorate the condition of his fellow men, and his abandonment of worldly 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 437 

ambitions in his efforts to follow in the footprints of the lowly Nazarene, 
content merely in doing His will, with no thought of reward or plaudits of 
those with whom he labors here. 

Rev. Mr. Hull was born November 23, 1858, at Hartwick Seminary, 
Otsego county. New York, the scion of a sterling old family of the Empire 
state, being the son of William and Elizabeth (Skinner) Hull, both natives 
of the state of New York. The father was for many years a well known 
minister in the English Evangelical Lutheran church. He was a man of 
great learning and rare strength of character; he spent his life in church 
work in the state of New York and he did a wonderful amount of good 
there during his day and generation. He and his wife have both passed 
to their rewards. 

William E. Hull was educated in a preparatory school at Hartwick, 
New York, later entered Wittenberg College at Springfield, Ohio, from 
which institution he was graduated with the class of 1884. Early in life he 
evinced a laudable ambition to enter the ministry and after his college course 
he entered the Theological Seminary at Hartwick, New York, where he 
made a splendid record, and then entered the ministry in the church of his 
father, in which he remained for ten years. He was pastor of the church 
of the English Evangelical Lutheran church at Cobleskill, New York, where 
he remained four and one-half years, when he came to Ohio and was pastor 
of a church of the same denomination at Bellefontaine for four years. In 
1897 he transferred his church allegiance from the English Evangelical 
Lutheran church to the Episcopal church, and became rector of the Episco- 
pal church at Bucyrus, Ohio, where he remained a year and a half, then, in 
September, 1899, he came to Mt. Vernon as rector of St. Paul's Episcopal 
church, one of the earliest churches of the denomination in the state, hav- 
ing been organized in 1826. Here he still continues to labor for the Master. 
Like all the charges he has been given, Rev. Mr. Hull has greatly strength- 
ened and built up the congregation here and has won his way into the hearts 
of the people, not only in his own congregation, but the general public as well. 
He has always been a profound student and is fearless in his advocacy of 
whatever he deems to be right, is broad-minded, whole-souled and pro- 
gressive, alert, painstaking and energetic, and as a pulpit orator he is earn- 
est, logical and often truly eloquent, never failing to hold his audience in 
rapt attention. 

On May 7, 1889, Rev. Mr. Hull was united in marriage with a lady 
of culture and refinement, known in her maidenhood as Wenona H. Weimer, 
daughter of Philip and Sarah J. (Homey) Weimer, a prominent family of 



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438 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Springfield, Ohio. One son and two daughters have graced the union of 
Rev. and Mrs. Hull, namely : Philip W., now a student at Kenyon G>Ilege, 
Gambier, Ohio; Ruth E. and Alice L., both students in the Mt. Vernon high 
school. 

•Rev. Mr. Hull is a member of the Masonic order and he has been prelate 
of the commandery for ten years. In his political affiliations he is a Repub- 
lican. The family home is at No. 117 East Chestnut street and its refined 
influences permeate the moral and social life of the entire community. 



JOHN B. WAIGHT. 



John B. Waight was bom on May 14, 1854, at Scio, Harrison county, 
Ohio. He is the son of George A. and Biddy (Gordon) Waight, the father 
bom near Frankfort, Germany, and from there he emigrated to America 
when nine years of age with his mother, his father having died in Germany. 
They came direct to Tuscarawas county, Ohio. The mother of the subject 
was bom in Ohio, and the father was a merchant in the town of Scio for 
many years and there his death occurred in 1891, his wife having preceded 
him to the grave in 1887. The Gordons were of Revolutionary stock and 
were prominent in their communities from the early history of the country. 

John B. Waight was reared in Scio, Ohio, and was educated in the pub- 
lic schools there and in Scio College, from which he was graduated in the 
class of 1871. His father was one of its financial backers and its popularity, 
was due in no small degree to his efiforts for many years. He was a mem- 
ber of the board of trustees during his life, from the founding of the college 
in 1866 until his death. He was a successful business man and was influ- 
ential in all circles in which he moved. 

John B. Waight took up the study of law immediately after his gradu- 
ation with Hon. Lewis Lenton, a prominent attorney of Cadiz, Ohio, and, 
having made rapid progress, he was admitted to the bar in the winter of 
1874 and in 1875 he came to Mt. Vernon and opened an office and here he 
has been engaged in practice ever since, having met with success from the 
first and his clientele has continued to increase until today he is one of the 
busiest attorneys in this section of the state. He practices in all the courts 
of the state and in the United States court. 

Mr. Waight was married on April 13, 1882. to Kate M. Ready, a lady 
of culture and refinement, the daughter of A. T. and Jennie (McBane) 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 439 

Ready, of New Philadelphia, Ohio, a prominent and influential family of 
that city. This union has been graced by the birth of two children : Armi- 
sted T., who was graduated from Cornell University in 1908, is in business 
in Chicago where he has made a successful start in the world of affairs; 
Jennie M. married Carl Rickets, of Columbus, Ohio. 

Politically, Mr. Waight is a Republican and has long been prominent in 
the affairs of his party. He has been city solicitor of Mt. Vernon and he 
was common pleas judge for one term. As judge he has an enviable and 
commendable record, his decisions having been characterized by fairness and 
a knowledge of the law in all its ramifications. He has never been an office 
seeker, though he has been frequently urged to run for various offices or to 
become a candidate for high official positions. 

Mr. Waight is interested in the gas development of this section and 
he has been successful in a business way and is one of the substantial men 
of affairs at Mt. Vernon. 

Fraternally, Mr. Waight belongs to the Masonic order and all degrees 
up to Knight Templar. He is also a member of the Knights of Pythias 
lodge. Religiously, he belongs to the Presbyterian church, being a regular 
attendant, and he is a high-minded Christian gentleman, advocating clean 
politics and wholesome living and honesty in all the relations of life, hav- 
ing had these principles inculcated in him by his sterling father, who was 
a man in whom honesty and integrity were cardinal principles. The Waights 
have always been prominent in the social life of the community and their 
pleasant, modern home is known to a wide circle of friends as a place of 
hospitality of an old-time genuine sincerity and of good cheer, and is one 
of the social meccas of the city. 



GEN. GOSHORN A. JONES. 

Human life is like the waves of the sea — they flash a few brief mo- 
ments in the sunlight, marvels of power and beauty, and then are dashed 
upon the relentless shores of death and disappear forever. As the mighty 
deep has rolled for ages past and chanted its sublime requiem and will con- 
tinue to roll during the coming ages until time shall be no more, so will the 
waves of human life follow each other in countless succession until they 
mingled at last with the billows of eternity's boundless sea. The passing of any 
human life, however humble and unknown, is sure to give rise to a pang of 

(29) 



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440 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

anguish to some heart,, but when the fell destroyer knocks audibly at the 
door of the useful and great and removes from earthly scenes the man of 
honor and influence and the benefactor of his kind, it not only means be- 
reavement to kindred and friends, but a public calamity as well. In the 
largest and best sense of the term, the late Gen. Goshorn A. Jones, of Mt. 
Vernon, was distinctively one of the notable men of his day and generation, 
and as such is entitled to a conspicuous place in the annals of his city, county 
and state, for as a citizen he was public-spirited and enterprising to an un- 
' wonted degree, as a friend and neighbor he combined the qualities of head 
and heart that won confidence and commanded respect and as a business 
man he stood second to none in Knox county. 

General Jones was born in Burnt Cabins, Fulton county, Pennsylvania, 
April 12, 1812, and after a long, useful and strenuous life, he passed to his 
rest on April 18, 1904, at the advanced age of ninety-two years, his long 
life being due, no doubt, in very large measure to his exemplary habits and 
right thinking. He was the son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Goshorn) Jones, 
both natives of Franklin county, Pennsylvania. In 1813 the parents emi- 
grated to Washington county, Pennsylvania, and located at Claysville and 
West Alexandria. In this locality the son, Goshorn A., spent his youth and 
obtained his education in the public schools there. In 1834 he came to Mt. 
Vernon, Knox county, Ohio, and began active business as a merchant, deal- 
ing also in produce and wool, continuing this business with gratifying re- 
sults until 1850, in which year he gave up business for the purpose of ac- 
cepting an apix)intment as United States marshal by President Zachary Tay- 
lor for the district of Ohio, the duties of which important position he dis- 
charged in a manner that reflected much credit upon himself and to the entire 
satisfaction of all concerned. At the expiration of his term of office he, in 
connection with John H. Winterbotham, engaged in the manufacture of 
agricultural implements, employing the convict labor of Fort Madison, Iowa. 
He continued in this business for about eleven years with much success, then 
spent several years in prospecting, visiting several of the most important min- 
ing regions of the United States. 

General Jones was the originator of the Cleveland, Mt. Vernon & Co- 
lumbus railroad, now- the Akron & Cincinnati railroad, and better known as 
the Akron division of the Pennsylvania lines, and in 1869 was made su- 
perintendent of the road, in which position he continued until William N. 
Monsaratt became president of the road. He managed its aflfairs in a man- 
ner that stamped him as an up-to-date business man, a natural bom organizer 
and promoter and won the hearty commendation of the stockholders. 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 441 

General Jones was married in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, to Sarah Raymond, 
daughter of Rev. Nathan Raymond, a popular minister in the Methodist 
Episcopal church who resided in Mt. Vernon for a number of years, having 
come here from New York. The death of Mrs. Jones occurred a number 
of years prior to that of her husband. Five children were born to them, as 
follows : Mrs. Mary J. Baker, Fanny, Mrs. Rachael Tilton, Ada, who 
married James Israel, whose sketch appears in another part of this work; 
Fred W. (deceased). 

General Jones was a Whig and later a Republican in politics. He was 
a general in the Ohio state militia prior to the Mexican war. He was a 
man of strong mental caliber and courageous in defense of his opinion when 
once convinced that he was right. He was one of the strong and important 
factors in this commtmity. He is buried in Mt. Vernon cemetery, and his 
influence and many good deeds will cause his memory to be cherished 
through corning generations. 



JUDGE GEORGE COYNER. 

An enumeration of the representative citizens of Knox county who have 
won recognition and success for themselves and at the same time con- 
ferred honor upon the community, would be incomplete were there failure 
to make mention of George Coyner, whose name has long* been a household 
word in this and Delaware counties, where he has held worthy prestige in 
legal and political circles. He has always been distinctively a man of affairs, 
wielding a wide influence among those with whom his lot was cast, ever 
having the affairs of his county and state at heart and lending such aid as he 
could in whatever pertained to their general progress, and it has been due 
to such men as he that this locality could justly claim a high order of citizen- 
ship and a spirit of enterprise which conserved consecutive development and 
marked advancement in its material upbuilding. This section has been, and 
is, signally favored in the class of men who have controlled its affairs in offi- 
cial capacity, and this is one of the connections in which Judge Coyner de- 
mands recognition, having served faithfully and well in positions of distinct 
trust and responsibility. He achieved a brilliant record at the bar at an age 
when most men are merely starting on their life work, for from the beginning 
he was intensely methodical and unswervingly scientific in search and seizure 
of the true light and of the essential morality and inspiration of the legal 



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442 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

foundations, and in sources of legal conception and thought, conscientious 
and intensely pure, having an. exalted firmness with which he recognized the 
ethics of the fixed principles of judicial systems, holding tenaciously to em- 
bellished records of equity, the invariable theorems of law, the sure, certain, 
invincible methods of practice; therefore abundant success could not help 
crowning his efforts and placing him on the topmost rung of the legal and 
judicial ladder and winning for him the well merited laudation of his fellow- 
men. 

George Coyner was born on June 5, 1858, in Lexington, Richland 
county, Ohio, of a sterling pioneer family of the Old Dominion. He is the 
son of Rev. David H. and Eliza Catherine (Snodgrass) Coyner, the father 
born in Augusta county, Virginia, and the mother in Hardy county, West 
Virginia. The former was reared and educated in Virginia, having at- 
tended Washington-Lee University, later graduating from Princeton Theo- 
logical College. His ministerial work was confined mostly to the Northern 
states, especially Pennsylvania. He was compelled to leave the South be- 
cause of his loyalty to the L^'nion. He was three times married. His first 
wife was Catherine McNeal, a member of the famous McNeal family of 
Virginia, wealthy and active in the Confederate service, both as soldiers and 
advisers; his first wife died in early life, at the birth of their first child, 
Catherine McNeal Coyner, now deceased, who married Samuel Alexander, 
a prominent figure in the Confederate army. Rtev. Mr. Coyner's second 
wife, Eliza Catherine Snodgrass, was the mother of the subject. Soon after 
their marriage they came to Indiana, the father becoming superintendent of 
public schools at Indianapolis, the duties of which he discharged for two 
years; then went to Ohio and engaged in the ministry, that being his chief 
life work. He was located at Lexington, Ohio, when his son George, of 
this review, was born, and there his second wife died, leaving a family of 
seventeen children. He subsequently married Frances Snodgrass, a sister 
of his second wife and she is still living, making her home in Delaware 
county, Ohio. To this last union three children were born, making the Rev. 
Mr. Coyner the father of twenty-one children in all. The Snodgrass family 
were also Virginians, and after the death of his second wife the father re- 
turned with his large family to the old home at Moorefield, West Virginia, 
which was during the Civil war. His well known stand for the Union 
aroused public sentiment against him and he was forced to return to the 
North, his life being threatened, in fact, he was only saved through the in- 
tervention of a relative of the McXeals who was in conmiand of a Con- 
federate band who sought to make the Rev. Mr. Coyner prisoner. He 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 443 

brought his family to Columbus, Ohio, and was appointed chaplain of the 
Eighty-eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry by Governor Todd, of Ohio,' and he 
and three of his sons were in the Federal army, one of the sons, Harvess, 
dying while in the service, from the effects of a wound; William was a 
member of the Tenth Ohio Cavalry, and Luther of the Eighty-eighth Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry with his father, serving until the close of the war. After 
his return home when hostilities had ceased, Rev. Mr. Coyner married 
Frances Snodgrass, a sister of his second wife, as before stated. He re- 
mained in the ministry for many years in Ohio. His death occurred in 
1883 at Eden, Delaware county, Ohio. He was prominent in his denomina- 
tion in that section of the state and ranked high in church life. 

George Coyner, of this sketch, was reared mostly in Ohio and he was 
educated in the public schools of Eden, this state, later entering the Cin- 
cinnati Law School, from which he was graduated in 1893. But prior to 
taking up the study of law he taught school for a number of years, winning 
a reputation as a progressive and able educator. 

In March, 1879, ^^ ^^s united in marriage with Enima Hippie, daugh- 
ter of George W. and Anna (Ferris) Hippie, of Delaware county, Ohio, 
both being now deceased. To the subject and wife three sons were born, 
namely : Charles S. and Leon, deceased ; Carl, the youngest, lives in Akron, 
Ohio. 

Mr. Coyner is a Republican in politics and has long been a potent factor 
in party affairs, his first public office being that of township clerk, which he 
held for a period of five years; then he was superintendent of the Delaware 
County Infirmary for four years. During three years of that time he read 
law during his spare moments, and it was in 1891 that he entered the law 
school, graduating from the same in 1893. He at once began practicing in 
Delaware county, where he met with instantaneous success and in 1895 ^e 
was elected prosecuting attorney of that county, his record being so emi- 
nently satisfactory that he was re-elected for a second term in 1898, serving 
for six years in an able and praiseworthy manner. In 1901 he was elected 
common pleas judge for five years. He brought to the bench a dignity 
becoming the high position, and in the line of duty was industrious, careful 
and singularly painstaking, which, combined with his sterling honesty and 
fearlessness of purpose, made him one of the most popular and efficient men 
ever called to preside over the affairs of that court. His opinions and de- 
cisions attested his eminent fitness for judicial positions, being always lucid, 
unstrained, unbiased and vigorous, his statements full and comprehensive, 
and his analysis and interpretations of the law conspicuous and complete, 
with a profound knowledge of all phases of the law and the statutes. 



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444 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Judge Coyner has always stood high in his profession and after his 
term as common pleas judge expired he moved to Mt. Vernon in 1907 and 
here he has built up an extensive practice in this and other counties, being 
frequently called in important cases in courts remote from his place of resi- 
dence. In 191 o he was elected a member of the Mt. Vernon board of edu- 
cation and is secretary of the board. Hie still maintains his interest in public 
affairs, especially educational matters. 

The Judge is a member of the Masonic order, the council and chapter 
at Mt. Vernon; also the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks. He is a member and the present commander of Henry 
B. Banning Camp No. 207, Sons of Veterans. He and his wife belong to 
the Presbyterian church. 

In point of critical legal scholarship, keen intellectuality and profes- 
sional success, Judge Coyner easily stands in the front rank, while in all that 
constitutes the upright man, the public-spirited citizen and the high-minded 
gentleman his position in the social circle and the world of affairs has been 
firfnly established, and he stands today among the leaders of thought and 
molders of opinion in a county prolific of men of distinction. 



JAMES ISRAEL. 



Self-assertion is believed by many people to be absolutely necessary to 
success in life, and there are good reasons for the entertainment of such be- 
lief. The modest man very rarely gets what is due him. The selfish, 
aggressive man elbows his w^ay to the front, takes all that is in sight and it 
sometimes seems that modesty is a sin with self-denial the penalty. There 
are, however, exceptions to all rules and it is a matter greatly to be regretted 
that the exceptions to the conditions referred to are not more numerous. One 
notable exception is the honorable gentleman whose life history w^e here 
present, w^ho possesses just a sufficient amount of modesty to be a gentle- 
man at all times and yet sufficient persistency to win in the business world 
and at the same time not appear over bold, and as a result of these well and 
happily blended qualities Mr. Israel has won a host of friends throughout 
Knox county, being well known as a man of influence, integrity and business 
ability, and as a patriotic citizen who has ever had the welfare of his county 
and state at heart. 

James Israel, of Mt. Vernon, was born in this city on October r, 1843, 
and he is the son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Harper) Israel. The father 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 445 

was born on October 8, 1810, at Bedford, Westchester county, New York, 
and when a young man he learned the trade of brick mason. In 1830, being 
influenced by better prospects, he proceeded to the West, a companion ac- 
companying him from New York to the land of promise. They first went 
to Detroit, Michigan, where they remained only a short time, then crossed 
Lake Erie to Sandusky and there put all their earthly belongings into a one- 
horse wagon and started for Mt. Vernon, which they reached in due time. 
Here Mr. Israel found employment at his trade as brick mason and soon 
found favor with the people. On January 28, 1831, Samuel Israel and 
Elizabeth Harper were married. The latter was a member of a prominent 
family of Muskingum county, living near Zanesville, and she was born May 
9, 1808. Establishing his permanent home here, Mr. Israel continued to 
work as a brick mason. He always had an insatiable ambition to obtain a 
high education, but he had few advantages in his youth. He wanted to be 
a lawyer. Mrs. Israel had been better provided with text-book training 
and she became her husband's tutor. About this time he was employed at 
his trade in erecting some of the Kenyon College buildings at Gambier, Ohio, 
five miles east of Mt. Vernon. WTiile thus engaged he walked to and fro 
between these towns every day, working all day and eating a cold lunch at 
noon. After supper he would pore over his books until ten or eleven o'clock, 
repeating his ordeal day after day. As he made progress in general educa- 
tion his desire to become a lawyer increased and Blackstone was added to 
his studies. He made progress rapidly and in time became a student in the 
oflice of Hon. Columbus Delano, becoming his partner after being admitted 
to the bar, and this partnership continued successfully for several years. In 
due course of time Mr. Israel became a prominent and successful member 
of the Knox county bar and was engaged in many of the most important 
cases in the courts of his district. His entire time and energies were given 
to his profession, with the exception of about six years, when he became in- 
terested with Gen. Goshorn A. Jones and Colonel Hard in the extension and 
construction of what is now the Qeveland, Akron & Cincinnati Railroad, 
known as the Akron division of the Pennsylvania Lines, from Millersburg, 
the county seat of Holmes county, to Columbus. After this was completed 
and in successful operation, Mr. Israel resumed the active practice of law, 
which he continued with his usual marked success until his death, August 15, 
1889, his wife having preceded him to the grave on September 11, 1882. They 
were the parents of seven children, only three of whom are now living, namely : 
Francis is deceased ; Adeline is deceased ; Amanda, deceased ; Sarah, deceased ; 
Lavinia, of Mt. Vernon ; James, of this review, and Samuel H., president of 
the Knox County Savings Bank. 



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446 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

Samuel Israel, father of these children, was a Democrat of the old 
school, but during the Civil war he was a staunch supporter of the gov- 
ernment. He was never an office seeker or an office holder, but he was fre- 
quently active as a stump speaker during campaigns, upholding the princi- 
ples of his party in an able manner. He was a man who always apphed 
himself with full force to the task in hand. He was a man of broad and 
liberal views and thorough information upon all subjects of public import. 
He was a conspicuous example of what a young man may aspire to and ac- 
quire in a country like ours, without money, without influence and without 
the advantages of even a preliminary education ; he acquired all of these af- 
ter reaching his majority and attained a place in the public estimation that 
might satiate the ambitions of any man. 

James Israel, the immediate subject of this review, obtained his edu- 
cation in the Mt. Vernon public schools and in his youth assisted with the 
work on his father's farm near the city. In the spring of 1864 he enlisted 
for service in the Union army, as a private in Company K, One Hundred 
and Forty-Second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, for the one-hundred-day ser- 
vice. He contracted typhoid fever and after recovering from a protracted 
illness he went to Chicago in the fall of 1864 and was employed in the 
wholesale hardware house of Seiberger & Breakey, remaining in their em- 
ploy for five years, during which time he learned the ins and outs of this 
line of business and gave the firm entire satisfaction. Returning to Mt. 
Vernon in the fall of 1869, he engaged in the manufacture of linseed oil 
and a general grain business, in which he met with success. He closed 
out his oil and grain business in 1897 and at the re-organization of the 
Mt. Vernon Bridge Company he became secretary and treasurer, also gen- 
eral manager of the same and he continued in this capacity until January, 
1910, when he became president of the company and was succeeded by his 
son George, as secretary and treasurer. During Mr. Israel's able and ju- 
dicious management he has seen the company grow from a concern of very 
modest proportions to one of the largest and most important factories of 
its kind in the state and the Middle West. He is a man of splendid business 
acumen, tact and foresight, with fine executive ability and keen discernment, 
succeeding at whatever he turns his attention to, being methodical and sys- 
tematic in everything. He is also vice-president of the Knox County Sav- 
ings Bank, of which his brother, Samuel H., is president, and they have a 
very potent influence in the financial circles of this locality. 

Mr. Israel is a Republican in politics, and for many years was active 
and influential in party councils and party affairs. During the administra- 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 447 

tion of President Harrison, Mr. Israel was postmaster at Mt. Vernon and 
during his term of office the free mail delivery system was established for 
Mt. Vernon. He also served as a member of the city board of education 
for ten years. He is a member of the Joe Hooker Post, Grand Army of the 
Republic. 

Mr. Israel was married on June 17, 1872, to Ada B. Jones, a lady of 
culture and refinement, daughter of Gen. Goshorn A. and Sarah (Raymond) 
Jones, a prominent Mt. Vernon family, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere 
in this work. This union has been blessed by the birth of three children, 
namely: George is married and he is secretary and treasurer of the Mt. 
Vernon Bridge Company, as before stated; John W. is now deceased; 
Sarah married Edward Dunnick. of Mt. Vernon. The family home is lo- 
cated at No. 105 East Gambier street and is the favorite gathering place 
of the best people in this vicinity, the family having long been important 
factors in local social circles. 



JOHN S. ALAN. 



The men most influential in promoting the advancement of society and 
in giving character to the times in which they live are two classes, the men 
who study and the men of action. Whether we are more indebted for the 
improvement of the age to the one class or the other is a question of honest 
difference of opinion; neither class can be spared and both should be en- 
couraged to occupy their several spheres of labor and influence, zealously 
and without mutual distrust. In the following paragraphs are briefly out- 
lined the leading facts and characteristics in the career of a gentleman who 
combines in his makeup the elements of the scholar and the energy of the 
public-spirited man of affairs. Devoted to the noble and humane work of 
teaching, he has made his influence felt in the school life of the city of Mt. 
Vernon and Kinox county and he is not unknown to the wider educational 
circles of the state, occupying as he does a prominent place in his profession 
and standing high in the esteem of educators in other than his own par- 
ticular field of endeavor. 

Mr. Alan is a descendant of sterling ancestors of the old Keystone 
state, of which he is a native, his birth having occurred in Greenville, Mercer 
county, Pennsylvania, October 28, 1872. He is the son of Walter T. and 
Laura (Sill) Alan, the father a Presbyterian minister of Greenville and 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 449 

The domestic life of Superintendent Alan began on June 15, 1900, 
when he was united in marriage with Edna L. Jackson, daughter of John 
and Sisson E. Jackson, a highly esteemed family of Greenville, Pennsyl- 
vania. This union has been without issue. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Alan belongs to the Masonic order, the 
chapter and comn>andery, being a past master of the Mt. Vernon lodge. 
Politically, he is a Republican and while he is always interested in the general 
progress of his community, supporting such measures as make for the gen- 
eral good, he is not a biased partisan or a seeker of political honors, prefer- 
ring to devote his exclusive attention to his chosen calling and keep abreast 
of the times in all phases of the same. He and his wife are members of the 
Presbyterian church and he has long been active in church affairs and Sun- 
day school work. 



CHARLES C. lAMS. 

Charles C. lams was born October 23, i860, at Tomah, Monroe county, 
Wisconsin, and he is the son of the late Rev. Francis M. and Mary M. lams. 
On November 11, 1875, the family located in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, where the 
subject has since made his home. In December, 1875, he was apprenticed 
to learn the printers' trade in the office of Park's Floral Magazine, and about 
fifteen months later he became the **devir' in the office of the Mt. Verfwn 
Republican, a weekly paper then published by Wilkinson and Knabenshue. 
He learned the business thoroughly and passed through all the stages of 
''devil,'' pressman, job printer and foreman, and in 1887 became city editor 
of the Republican under the editorship of the late Col. Charles F. Baldwin, 
whom he succeeded as editor in the fall of 1894. In January, 1900, the 
Republican Publishing Company, publishers of the Mt. Vernon Daily Re- 
publican-News and the Knox County Semi-lVeekly Republican-News re- 
organized as follows : Ben Ames, president ; Charles C. lams, vice-president, 
editor and manager, and L. A. Culbertson, secretary and treasurer; and this 
organization still continues. The news columns of the papers published by 
this company teem with the best and brightest chronicles of the world's hap- 
penings, and from a mechanical standpoint the Re public an-N eivs ranks with 
the best in the state, and it is rapidly growing in importance as an adver- 
tising medium. 

Politically, Mr. lams is a Republican and has ever been loyal in sup- 
porting and defending his party principles and he is prominent and influ- 



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448 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

Still active, being prominent in that denomination in his section of the state. 
The mother of the subject passed to her rest in the spring of 1904. 

John S. Alan was reared in a wholesome Christian atmosphere arid the 
ethics inculcated there have had much to do in shaping his subsequent ca- 
reer. He was educated in the public schools of Greenville, later entering 
Thiel College at that place, where he made an excellent record for scholar- 
ship and from which institution he w^as graduated in 1893, with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts, and in 1900 he received the degree of Master of Arts 
from the same institution. He has long entertained a laudable ambition to 
devote his life to teaching' and, thus well equipped for his chosen vocation, 
he began teaching in the public schools of Greenville, where he continued 
for a period of four years, giving success from the first, his record auguring 
greater things in coming years. Then, for three years he was superintend- 
ent of the schools at Lowellville, Ohio. The next four years were spent as 
superintendent of public schools at Fredericktown, Knox county, and fol- 
lowing this, in 1905, he came to Mt. Vernon as principal of the high school 
and a year later he was promoted to the superintendency, which position 
he still holds in a manner that reflects much credit uix)n himself and to the 
eminent satisfaction of all concerned. 

Professor Alans years of service as a superintendent have been char- 
acterized by a series of advancements in educational methods which demon- 
strate his ability as a man of progressive ideas, besides winning for him 
an honorable place among the leading superintendents of the state. Pos- 
sessing great force of character and executive ability of a high order, he 
has brought the schools under his. care to a high standard of efficiency, in- 
sisting that only teachers of recognized scholarship and professional ex- 
perience be employed, and strengthening the courses of study. As an edu- 
cator he is widely known and his suggestions pertaining to matters educa- 
tional command respect in all the institutes, associations and conventions of 
superintendents which he attends, his well known success as a school man- 
ager and wide practical experience in general educational matters having 
long been of special value to his fellow associates, among whom he is held 
in the highest personal esteem. He is still a young man, in the very prime 
of vigorous physical and mental powers and in possessing genial manners, 
superior scholarship, which, with his years of close application from common 
school to high school principalship, and membership with some of the highest 
educational bodies of the land, it is eminently proper to bespeak for him a fu- 
ture of still greater efficiency and distinguished service in his chosen field of 
endeavor. 



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450 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

ential in the councils of the party, both in county and state campaigns. He 
has never been an office seeker, but has aided in placing the best men in local 
offices. He is widely regarded as an able and worthy exponent of good gov- 
ernment and right living. Fraternally, he is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Masonic order, hav- 
ing passed the chairs in the subordinate lodges of these orders as well as in 
the chapter, council and commandery ; he is a Knight Templar, a member of 
the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, and of the Be- 
nevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Mr. lams was married on November 25, 1880, to Katherine M. Hill, 
daughter of the late J. M. and Elizabeth Hill, and this union has resulted in 
the birth of one daughter, Edythe. 

The Mt, Vernon Republican was established in 1840, and it was con- 
tinued as a weekly paper until 1885, when it became a semi-weekly, attain- 
ing a large circulaMon. Col. C. F. and W. F. Baldwin, proprietors, Col. 
Charles F. Baldwin being editor-in-chief. A few years later the paper was 
purchased by the Republican Publishing Company, and in September, 1897, 
the publication of a daily edition was begun. The following year the word 
Neivs was added to the original name, the publication becoming the Mt. 
Vernon Daily and Semi-Weekly Republican News. These papers have a 
wide circulation and are recognized among readers and advertisers as be- 
ing up-to-date. The company also has a well equipped job office and this 
department does a large business. The office is modernly equipped in every 
respect, including a duplex newspaper press, rapid job presses, an abundance 
of modern type and other materials; the equipment also includes two lino- 
type machines. The company owns its own building, a substantial two- 
story brick with basement, and admirably arranged for modern newspaper 
work. 



FRANK O. LEVERING. 

The life of the scholarly or professional man seldom exhibits any of those 
striking incidents that seize upon public feeling and attract attention to him- 
self. His character is generally made up of the aggregate qualities and qual- 
ifications he may possess, as these may be elicited by the exercise of the duties 
of his vocation or the particular profession to which he belongs. But when 
such a man has so impressed his individuality upon his fellow men as to gain 
their confidence and through that confidence rises to high and important 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 45 1 

public trust, he at once becomes a conspicuous figure in the lx>dy ix)litic of the 
community and state. Frank O. Levering, ex-probate judge, and one of the 
leading attorneys of this section of the Buckeye state, is one of the scholarly, 
public-spirited, progressive citizens of the locality of which this history 
deals, who, not content to hide his talents amid life's sequestered ways, has 
by the force of will and a laudable ambition forged to the front in a respon- 
sible and exacting calling, and earned an honorable reputation in one of the 
most important branches of public service. 

Mr. Levering is a worthy representative of two of our sterling pioneer 
families and his life has been spent in Knox county, his birth having oc- 
curred in Middlebury township on September 29, 1862. He is the son of 
John Cook Levering and Carrie (Richardson) Levering. When Ohio was 
a vast wilderness and the land still in possession of the government, and the 
abode of Indians and many species of wild beasts, the Levering family in- 
vaded its primeval solitudes and the name has been well known here e\'er 
since, figuring more or less conspicuously in the annals of the county of 
Knox, especially. The first progenitors of this family came to America in 
the latter years of the seventeenth century — Gerhard and Wigard Levering, 
who were sons of Rosier Levering, who was born in Holland of Anglo- 
Saxon f>arentage, his father and mother having been exiled from England 
on account of their religious belief. Rosier Levering married Elizabeth Van- 
dewall, of Westphalia, Germany, and their son Gerhard was born in Camen, 
Germany, in 1660. In 1685, accompanied by his brother, Wigard, he crossed 
the Atlantic to America. Gerhard Levering married, and among his chil- 
dren was Daniel, who was born on December 2, 1704, and on May 12, 1735. 
Daniel w-as married, in Christ church, Philadelphia, to Margaret Beane, and 
they lived on a farm of one hundred acres in Whiteplain towrkship, Mont- 
gomery' county, New Jersey. To them was born a son, Henry, on June 10, 
1738, who was the great-great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch. For 
many years Henry Levering lived at the Durham iron works in New Jersey, 
but in 1785 he removed to a farm in Bedford county, Pennsylvania He 
married Ann Wynn, and to them was born Daniel Levering, the subject's 
great-grandfather, in New Jersey, on February 3, 1764. In 1785 he ac- 
companied his parents to Bedford county, Pennsylvania, where he married 
Mary Kerney. In 181 1 he visited Knox county, Ohio, and purchased a large 
tract of land from the government, in Owl creek valley, where he later 
located with his family and there spent his remaining years, starting as pi- 
oneer in the forest. His death occurred in 1820, his widow surviving until 
October 24, 1846, dying at the advanced age of eighty-four years. They 
were devout Presbyterians and leading citizens in the community. 



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452 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

Noah Levering, the paternal grandfather of the subject of this sketch, 
was bom in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, on November 7, 1802, and in 
181 3 he came with his parents to Knox county, Ohio, and here he was mar- 
ried on March 25, 1828, to Armanella Cook, daughter of John and Ann 
Cook, who came to Ohio from Washington county, Pennsylvania, about 
1805. Noah Levering was a farmer and his death occurred on March 4, 
1881, his wife having preceded him to the grave on June 13, 1879. 

John Cook Levering, father of the immediate subject of this review, 
was born on the old family homestead in Middlebury township, September 
II, 1829, being the eldest of a family of ten children. He assisted his father 
with the general work on the farm and when twenty-one years old he pur- 
chased a farm of eighty acres and began farming for himself. In the year 
i860 he was united in marriage with Carrie Richardson, daughter of Daniel 
and Thankful (Camp) Richardson, the father being a well known lumber 
merchant in New York for many years. Mr. Levering continued farming 
and adding to his holdings until he became one of the extensive landowners 
and substantial farmers of the county, actively interested in everything that 
made for the general progress of the community. He had an extensive repu- 
tation as a stockman, handling the best grades in the county, winning many 
first premiums, and he did as much if not more to improve the grade of do- 
mestic animals here in his day as any one. In 1866 he became a member of 
the Knox County Agricultural Society, of which he was a member for many 
years and for a numl^er of years the president of the same. In 1881 he was 
elected a member of the Ohio state board of agriculture, and he assisted in 
the purchase and improvement of the present beautiful state fair grounds 
at Columbus, Ohio. For six years he was a member of the board, and was 
its first treasurer in 1885 ^^^ '^s president in 1886. In 1883 he represented 
Ohio in the national convention. In 1887 Governor Foraker appointed him 
a member of the Ohio centennial board. In 1890 he read a paper at the re- 
quest of the secretary of the State Society of Agriculture before the Ohio 
agricultural convention on " Farmers' Horses and Horse Breeding." This 
led to the formation of the Ohio State Draft and Coach Horse Association 
in 189T, of which Mr. Levering was the president for three years. In 1871 
he was elected commissioner of Knox county and. re-elected in 1874, and 
many of the substantial improvements of the county were made during these 
years He was a life-long Democrat in politics, and in 1886 his party nomi- 
nated him for Congress in the nineteenth Ohio district. He was always 
painstaking and conscientious in the performance of all public duties and he 
became known throughout the state, esp>ecially as an agriculturist and stock 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 453 

man. and his influence was very potent and far-reaching in promoting mod- 
ern phases in both. He was a man of keen business discernment, sound 
judgment and wise foresight, public-spirited and always ready with time and 
means to further any laudable undertaking" for the general good of his lo- 
cality. Early in life he became a member of the Presbyterian church and was 
a devout church member. He was a good and useful man and enjoyed the 
confidence, admiration and universal esteem of all who knew him. His 
death occurred September 13, 1903, and his widow is still living. 

Frank O. Levering spent his youth on the farm and obtained his early 
education in the district schools, which he attended in the winter time, as- 
sisting with the general farm work during crop seasons. He later attended 
and graduated with honors from Eastman's Commercial College at Pough- 
keepsie, X'ew York. In 1885 he entered the mercantile business at the vil- 
lage of Levering, Knox county, but not finding this line of endeavor entirely 
to his liking he abandoned the same in 1890 and took up the study of law in 
Mt. Vernon in the oflfice of Hon Frank V, Owen and was admitted to the 
bar in 1892. He immediately began practicing in Mt. Vernon and he has 
built up a large and growing clientage, taking a place in the front rank of 
the legal profession in a locality long noted for the high order 
of its legal talent. He has kept fully abreast of the times in every- 
thing pertaining to his profession, winning a reputation for persistency, cau- 
tion and a safe and prudent advocate, with few equals and no superiors. 
In 1883 he was appointed a member of the county board of elections and he 
performed his duties so faithfully that he was twice re-appointed. In 1896 
he was elected probate judge of Knox county, which office he filled to the 
entire satisfaction of all concerned, irrespective of party alignment and giv- 
ing evidence of attributes of a superior order and a fidelity to right that 
knew no bias. Retiring from office, he resumed the practice of the law, 
which he has continued with his usual success. 

In connection with his professional duties, Judge Levering has been 
actively associated with the gas and oil development of this section of the 
state, and through his efforts much of the success of the field is attributable, 
and he has met with much success in a business way. 

Politically, the Judge is an uncompromising Democrat, as was his hon- 
ored father before him, and he has been active and prominent in party coun- 
cils. He was a delegate to the Democratic national convention of 1900, and 
his work in committees has been effectual and has resulted in much good to 
the party. He has been a very influential delegate to county, district and state 
conventions. Fraternally, he belongs to the Masonic order, the chapter, 



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454 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

council and comanandery, and is a past officer in all of the bodies; he is also 
a member of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He 
is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights 
of Pythias, and has filled the presiding offices in these lodges, being prom- 
inent in fraternal circles of the county. 

Mr. Levering was married in 1886 to Byrdess E. Leiter, daughter of 
Capt. C. P. Leiter, a prominent citizen of Shelby, Ohio, of which city he was 
mayor for a number of years and otherwise an influential citizen there. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Levering have been bom six children, namely: Howard A., 
Russell Edgar, John Collin, Nina May, Carlos and Ada. 



GEORGE D. ARNDT, M. D. 

Good intellectual training, thorough professional knowledge and the 
possession and utilization of the qualities and attributes essential to suc- 
cess, have made Dr. George D. Arndt, of Mt. Vernon, eminent in his chosen 
calling, and he stands today among the enterprising and popular physicians 
in a community noted for the high order of its medical talent, having, by 
his own persistent and praiseworthy eflforts, won for himself a name whose 
luster the future years shall only augment, for at the same time he has won 
the confidence and esteem of the people of Knox county as a result of his 
exemplary life and obliging, genial nature. 

Doctor Arndt was born in Amherst, Ohio, March 5, 1865, and is the 
son of John L. and Catherine (Graw) Arndt. The father was born in 
Germany, and there grew to manhood and was educated. He was one of 
the revolutionists of his country in 1849 ^"^ ^^'^^ imprisoned until 1853, 
in which year he was banished from the country, having been one of the 
early organizers of the revolution. He came direct to America and lo- 
cated in Hartford, Connecticut. He was educated as a minister in the 
German State church, but he had abandoned this for the study of medicine, 
and upon coming to America became qualified to practice and he opened an 
office in Hartford, later going to New York City and while engaged in prac- 
tice there he was married to Catherine Graw, of Newark, New Jersey. 
In 1858 he came to Qeveland, Ohio, where he became connected with 
the Cleveland Homeopathic College. In 1863 he moved to Amherst, Ohio, 
and here he was commissioned to recruit a company for service in the Civil 
war, and at a meeting for securing recruits he had occasion to make some 



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GEORGE D. ARNDT, M. D. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 455 

caustic remarks regarding the attitude of some anti-war Etemocrats and for 
his utterances he was attacked by some of the men present and was left for 
dead, but he finally recovered and lived two years afterwards, but eventually 
died from the injuries received upon that occasion. His widow then entered 
the Cleveland Homeopathic Medical College, from which she was gradu- 
ated in the year 1869, in the class with her oldest son, Hugo R., who is now 
field secretary of the American Institute of Homeopathy and an author of 
text books on homeopathy. The mother then practiced at Amherst, with 
much success until her death, in August, 1887, her death having been due 
to a sun-stroke, sustained on the streets of Cleveland. 

Five children were born to John L. Amdt and wife, three of whom are 
living: Henry F., in addition to those mentioned above, is a successful 
business man, active in the development of the famous Amherst quarries, 
and is also prominent in public affairs; he is now one of the county com- 
missioners of Lorain county. These children were reared and educated by 
the mother, who was a woman of unusual tact, intelligence and praiseworthy 
qualities. She w^as highly skilled in her chosen profession and enjoyed a 
large patronage and the friendship of a wide acquaintance. 

George D. Arndt was educated in the public schools of Amherst until 
he was thirteen years of age, when he went to work on a farm and at the age 
of nineteen he returned to the public schools in Amherst where he completed 
the high school course in four months. He had previously learned the car- 
penters' trade. Upon leaving the home schools he was an attendant at the 
Kalamazoo State Asylum for the Insane, preparatory to taking up the 
study of medicine, for which he had a natural bent, in view of the fact that 
both his parents had been medical people. In October, 1885, the subject 
entered Michigan University at Ann Arbor, Michigan, in which institution 
his brother. Dr. Hugo Arndt, was a professor of materia medica. George 
D. was graduated from this department in June, 1888, with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine, having made an excellent record there for scholarship. 
He then went to St. Joseph's Retreat, at Dearborn, Michigan, as physician 
and here he was meeting with encouragfing success when he was injured by 
an inmate. While he was recovering he was induced to. locate at Berlin 
Heights, Erie county, Ohio, and there he was engaged in practice for a year 
and a half, and while there he was married, on March 5, 1890, to Ada M. 
Pearl, daughter of Capt. A. H. and Thursa M. (Hyde) Pearl, a well known 
family of that place. The union of the Doctor and wife was graced by the 
birth of three daughters, namely: Louise E., Loma P. and Mary C, all 
living at home at this writing. 

(30) 



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456 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

In 1889 Dr. Arndt moved to Granville, Licking county, Ohio, where he 
continued practicing with his usual success for one and one-half years. He 
then moved to San Diego, California, where he spent three years. Return- 
ing to Ohio in 1894, he located in Mt. Vernon and has practiced here ever 
since, having built up a large and ever-growing practice with the city and 
county and taking first rank among the leading medical men of this section 
of the Bucke}e state. He maintains a well-equipped office at No. 7 South 
Gay street. He has been very successful as a general practitioner and, ever 
a profound student of medical science, he has kept well abreast of the times 
in all that pertains to his chosen calling. He belongs to the Knox County 
Medical Society, the Ohio State Medical Society; Homeopathic State 
Medical Society, and the American Medical Association; American Institute 
of Homeopathy, the .American Roentgenological Society, the American 
Electro-Therapeutic Society, before all of which he has read papers which 
have always been well received and carried weight; he also belongs to the 
Southeastern Ohio Medical Society, and he has been a research student, al- 
ways upon special subjects. 

Politically, the Doctor is independent. He is a member of the city board 
of education, and he and his family are members of the Congregational 
church. 

While Doctor Arndt does a general practice, he has made a specialty 
of the eye, ear, nose and throat and he has won a wide reputation in this 
line, having few peers among his colleagues in this locality. The family 
is prominent in medical, literary and social circles of Mt. Vernon and their 
friends are limited only by the bounds of their acquaintance. 



SHERIDAN G. DOWDS. 

In the constant and laborious struggle for an honorable competence and 
a creditable name on the part of business or professional men, there is little 
to attract the r^der in search of a sensational chapter, but to a mind thor- 
oughly awake to the true meaning of life and its responsibilities there are 
noble and imperishable lessons in the career of an individual who, with little 
other means than a sound mind, fertile perceptive faculty, a true heart and 
willing hands, conquers adversity and not only wins a prominent position in 
the industrial world, but what is equally as great, the deserved esteem and 
confidence of his fellow men. Such a man is Sheridan G. Dowds, for manv 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 457 

years one of the leading business men of Knox county and the present efficient 
and popular postmaster of Mt. Vernon, whose name is so intimately associ- 
ated with the material and civic interests of the locality where he has spent 
his life, his upright career and wholesome moral influence making him popu- 
lar with all classes, irrespective of party alignment'. 

Mr. Dowds was born on July i8, 1865, on a farm near Amity, Pike 
township, Knox caunty, Ohio. He is the son of Elijah W. and Mary E. 
(Barber) Dowds, the father bom in West Virginia and the mother in Knox 
county, Ohio. Elijah Dowds came to this county when a young man, fol- 
lowing the death of his father in West Virginia, when the country was only 
partly developed, his mother having accompanied him, and they settled in 
Monroe township, in the woods, having bought land, which he l)egan clear- 
ing, and, by hard work and good management, he had a good farm and a 
comfortable home in due course of time. They underwent the hardships inci- 
dent to the lives of early settlers, meeting the struggle commendably and cour- 
ageously. The Barber family came from Pennsylvania and settled in Pike 
township, Knox county, and here Elijah Dowds and Mary E. Barber were 
married. The elder Dowds became one of the prosperous farmers of the 
township and a large landowner and prominent in local affairs. He was a 
man of exemplary character and was highly regarded. His death occurred 
in May, 1878, when his son, Sheridan G., of this sketch, was fourteen years 
old. His widow survives. She was born on >?oveml:>er 3, 1833, being twenty- 
seven years the junior of her husband, who was born in 1806. They were 
the parents of seven sons, namely : Wilson B., deceased ; Joseph S., deceased ; 
John H., of Los Angeles, California; Sheridan G., of this sketch: Charles C, 
of Mt. Vernon; Cornelius K. is farming in Pike township, this county; 
Alva A., of Mt. Vernon. 

Sheridan G. Dowds was reared on the home farm, where he worked 
when of proper age during the crop season, attending the country district 
schools in the winter months. He remained at home on the farm until his 
marriage, on February 18, 1888, to Aurilla D. Black, daughter of Dr. J. I., 
and Dors J. (Sapp) Black, an excellent family of Amity; Mr.* Black is de- 
ceased, but Mrs. Black is still living. 

Two sons and two daughters have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Dowds, 
namely: Robert E. is a student at Ohio Wesleyan University, at Delaware, 
Ohio; EdAvin D. is a medical student; Vivian is a student at the Ohio Wes- 
leyan University: Marjorie E. is at home with her parents. 

After his marriage Mr. Dowds engaged in the general mercantile busi- 
ness at Democracy, Pike township, this county, which he continued there 



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458 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

until 1 89 1, when he was elected treasurer of Knox county and moved to 
Mt. Vernon, holding this office during two terms, being regarded as an effi- 
cient and faithful public servant. He then went to Chesterville, Morrow 
county, this state, where he resumed merchandising, maintaining a store 
there four years, when his store was burned, after which he .returned to Mt. 
Vernon, in 1900, and here engaged in the wholesale grocery business under 
the firm name of J. Hildreth & Company, continuing with his usual success 
until 1905, when Mr. Hildreth died and the Kelser-Dowds Company was 
formed, wholesale grocers, as a corporation and they have continued in 
business to the present time, enjoying a large patronage throughout this 
section of the state, carrying a large and carefully selected line of staple and 
fancy groceries, shipping large consignments of goods to surrounding towns 
and taking a high rank in the local business workl. 

Politically, Mr. Dowds is an uncompromising Republican and he has 
always been prominent in public affairs and a local party leader. In 1905 
he was elected to the state Legislature as representative from Knox county 
and he served one terni in a manner that reflected much credit upon himself 
and won the hearty approval of his constituents. He made his influence felt 
for the good of his community and the state in general and won the respect 
and admiration of his colleagues. He assisted in the election of Mark Hanna 
to the United States Senate. In 1908 he was appointed postmaster at Mt. 
Vernon and has discharged the duties of the same to the present time in a 
highly satisfactory manner to the people and the department. He has been a 
frequent delegate to party conventions and has been a member of county and 
district committees and prominent in the councils of his party. 

Fraternally, Mr. Dowds belongs to the Masonic order, and is a mem- 
ber of the commander}^ and the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine and he is active in fraternal affairs. He and his family belong 
to the Methodist Episcopal church and he is a faithful supporter of the same. 
The family takes a leading part in the social life of the community. 



JOHN TA\a.OR SMITH. 

It is always pleasant and profitable to contemplate the career of a man 
who has won a definite goal in life, whose record has been such as to com- 
mand the honor and respect of his fellow citizens. Such in brief is the record 
of John Taylor Smith, farmer of College township, Knox county, an honest. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 459 

whole-souled gentleman who has tried to lead a life of sobriety and upright- 
ness, one that would give offense to no one, laboring not only for his own 
advancement and that of his immediate family, but also for the improvement 
of the entire community whose interests he has long had at heart. Although 
he hails from the old Oriole state, the major part of his active career has 
been spent in the vicinity of which this history treats. 

Mr. Smith was born in Washington county, Maryland, on November 
26, 1846. He is the son of Joseph B. and Mary (Brewer) Smith, who grew 
up and were married in the Eastern states and came to Knox county, Ohio, 
in 1861, with their family, and settled on a farm in Pleasant township and 
here became very well established Politically, the father was a Republican, 
but was not active in public affairs, though always interested. His death 
occurred in February, 1869, when he was fifty-two years old, his widow 
surviving many years, her death having occurred in 1901 at the advanced 
age of seventy-eight years. Their family consisted of nine children, five of 
whom are now living, namely : John T., of this sketch ; Mary, who married 
Alva Steinmetz, he being now deceased; Elizabeth has remained single; Dan- 
iel B. lives in Mt. Vernon ; Matilda married Edward Kring, of Mt. Vernon. 

John T. Smith, of this sketch, was reared on the home farm where, as 
soon as old enough, he was put to work in the fields. During the winter 
months he attended the district schools. He was married on January 28, 
1880, to Mary J. Boyd, daughter of Hugh and Jane (McLean) Boyd, of 
Clay township, Knox county. Three children have been born to the subject 
and wife, namely: J. Boyd; Grace L. is deceased; Joseph Charles is also de- 
ceased. The living child is married and is making his home with his father, 
assisting with the general work on the farm. 

After his marriage John T. Smith began farming in Pleasant township, 
this county, where he remained ten years, then moved to College township 
in 1890, locating on the farm where he still resides, and which he has brought 
up to a high state of improvement and cultivation. In connection with gen- 
eral farming he makes a specialty of raising sheep, keeping large herds, 
which, owing to their excellent quality, bring good prices. He has been suc- 
cessful in the wool business and for twenty-five years he engaged in saw- 
milling in Pleasant township. He has been very successful in a business way 
and now has a good farm, a pleasant home and a fair competency. 

Politically, Mr. Smith is a Republican and he has been active in public 
affairs. He has been township trustee and school director for several years. 
He was elected county commissioner in 1901 and he served two terms or 
seven years. He has always discharged his duties very acceptably and effi- 



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460 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

ciently in all public positions. He has been a frequent delegate to district 
and county conventions, and is an influential and well known citizen in this 
part of the county. Fraternally, he is a member of the Knights of Pythias, 
Mt. Vernon Lodge, also the Pleasant Grange, Patrons of Husbandry, being 
a charter member of No. 677, of the latter. He has been an active member 
and officer in the Grange. He and his wife belong to the Presbyterian church, 
in which he is an elder and an active worker in the church and Sunday school. 



STEPHEN B. DODD. 



The gentleman whose life history is herewith outlined is a man who has 
lived to good purpose and achieved a much greater degree of success than 
many of his contemporaries, who started out together "in life's morning 
march when the bosom is young.'' By a straightforward and commendable 
course Mr. Dodd has made his way to a respectable position in the business 
world, winning the hearty admiration of the people of Martinsburg and the 
southern part of Knox county, as an enterprising, progressive man of affairs 
which the public has not been slow to recognize and appreciate. 

Stephen B. Dodd was born on July 8, 1847, on a farm in Clay town- 
ship, one mile east of Martinsburg. He is the son of Stephen Baldwin Dodd 
and Sarah Ann (Sinkey) Dodd, both natives of Washington county, Penn- 
sylvania, from which they each came with their parents to Knox county, 
Ohio, when children and here they grew to maturity, received their educa- 
tional training in the common schools and were married. Rev. Thaddeus 
I>odd, grandfather of the subject, came here with his family in an early day 
and the Sinkey family were also early settlers. The paternal grandfather 
was a man of much influence in the Presbyterian church and he did much 
good in his ministerial work wherever he went in the early days. His son, 
Stephen B. Dodd, father of the subject, was a physician and practiced his 
profession at Martinsburg for many years. He became one of the best known 
doctors in the county in his day. He studied medicine after he was married, 
later attending the Cincinnati Medical College. He was a physician of the 
old school and, although some of his methods were somewhat heroic, he w^as 
very successful. He had four sons: Abraham, who was bom March i, 1843, 
was a medical student when he died February 16, 1864: Stephen B., of this 
review; Alfred M., born March 29, 185 1, is a traveling salesman and resides 
in Columbus, Ohio; James F., born July 21, 1858, lives in Delaware, Ohio, 
and is also a traveling salesman. 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 46 1 

The Dodd family is of English origin. Daniel Dodd, the first member 
of the family in America, was born in England and he came to the United 
States in early years as the sole representative of his family and his death 
occurred at Bradford, Connecticut, in 1665. He had four sons, Daniel, 
Ebenezer, Stephen and Samuel. The subject of this sketch is a descendant 
of Stephen Dodd, who was a Presbyterian minister, and the professions have 
been represented by each succeeding generation. The Christian name, 
Stephen, has been adopted by succeeding members of the family to the sub- 
ject. There is no representative at present in Knox county of the family of 
Abraham Sinkey. This family was related to President James Buchanan, 
also Robert Fulton, the great inventor. The death of Grandfather Sinkey 
occurred on June 20, 1841, at the age of seventy-three years. His wife sur- 
vived until February 11, 1872, reaching the advanced age of ninety-eight 
years. The grandparents on both sides of the house of the subject were 
buried in the Martinsburg cemetery. Grandfather Sinkey served in the army 
during the Indian wars. 

Dr. Stephen B. Dodd was born on June 10, 1820, and he died on June 
30, 1863, his widow surviving until May 13, 1891, when seventy-two years 
old, having been born on March 20, 1818. They spent practically their 
entire lives in Clay township, Knox county, having come here in 1823, and 
they saw the county develop from a wilderness to one of the foremost sec- 
tions of the Buckeye state, and took no small part in the same, being indus- 
trious and highly honored people. 

Stephen B. Dodd, of this sketch, worked some on the farm in his boy- 
hood and he received his education in the public schools of Martinsburg. He 
was married on April 22, 1875, ^o Mariah E. McClelland, daughter of Henry 
and Vasti (Woodruff) McClelland. Her father came from Pennsylvania 
when a small boy, his father having emigrated here with the early pioneers 
and settled in Licking county, Ohio, where Mrs. Dodd's father grew to man- 
hood, and this family has been prominent in this section ever since. Mr. Mc- 
Clelland died in July, 1908, and his wife on March 20, 1901. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dodd are the parents of three sons and three daughters, 
namely: Abraham Nelson, born September 16, 1876, lives in Niewark, 
CMiio: Alfred M., born March 5, 1878, lives in Utica: Lena L., born August 
28, 1879, married Mark Edmond, of Licking county: Blanche B., January 14, 
1881, married Clyde Berger, of Martinsburg; Ida M., May 19, 1883, died 
August 5, 1889; William H., bom March 9, 1887, lives at Utica: Ethel E., 
bom May 28, 1889, married Ray Layman, of Licking county. 

After his marriage Mr. Dodd settled in Martinsburg and engaged in 



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462 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

the mercantile business for several years; since then he has followed various 
pursuits, always with success. He is a man of industry and applies himself 
closely to whatever he has in hand. He has long maintained a saw mill and 
feed mill in Martinsburg, and has also been engaged in water-well drilling 
for a number of years. In connection with these interests, he looks after his 
farm, a half mile south of Martinsburg. He has been a busy man of affairs 
and has established a commodious and pleasant home. 

Politically, Mr. Dodd is a Republican and is a loyal supporter of his 
party's principles, in fact, has long been regarded as a local leader, his counsel 
being frequently sought by candidates. He supports such measures as make 
for the general upbuilding of the community. At one time he very ably 
represented Clay township as a member of the Republican county central 
committee and he has been a frequent delegate to conventions of his party. 
He has been a member of the Martinsburg school board and has held various 
other local offices. He is a member of the township electcn board. 

Fraternally, Mr. Dodd belongs to the Masonic orc.er, having been a 
Mason for more than thirty years. He and his family are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church and he is a class leader in the same and has long 
been active in church and Sunday school work. Mrs. Dodd is a worthy 
member of the various church societies. 

The Dodds have long been prominent in the circles in which they have 
been pleased to move, their influence having always been strong in the gen- 
eral upbuilding of the community of their residence. 



GEORGE E. HOOK. 



Devoting his energies to agriculture, George E. Hook, of the vicinity of 
Martinsburg, enjoys distinctive prestige as one of the most enterprising and 
progressive of our younger generation of farmers. He is one of the large 
land owners of Clay township, of which he is a native and where he has been 
content to spend his life, having wisely decided that no better opportunities 
were to be found by a man of his bent than right here in this nature- favored 
section of the great Buckeye state. In point of general improvements his 
fertile fields and substantial buildings are not surpassed in his neighborhood. 
With not an abundance of capital, but with a liberal endowment of self- 
reliance, a clear brain, a strong will and a determined purpose, Mr. Hook has 
overcome many obstacles and discouraging circumstances and has gradually 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 463 

forged to the front in the chosen arena of his endeavor while, yet **in lifers 
morning march when the bosom is young." As a citizen he has sought to be 
a supporter of such movements as are calculated to make for the general 
improvement of the community in which he resides, and he has kept untar- 
nished the honored name of his forebears, the family having been well known 
and highly esteemed here for over a half century. 

Mr. Hook was born in Pleasant township, Knox county, June 7, 1874, 
on a farm. He is the son of Thomas and Ella (Bell) Hook, the father born 
in Kirkersville, Licking county, Ohio, September 4, 1847, and the mother was 
born near Utica, that county. They both came to Knox county as young 
people and were married here, first settling on a farm near Hunt's Station, 
and they became well established through industry and close application. The 
father is still living, his wife having died on May 8, 1888. Two sons were 
born to these parents, George E., of this review, and Charles, who lives in 
Licking county. 

The Hook family has been a prominent one in Qay township, and there 
the grandparents, Ezra and Jane (Hunt) Hook, are still living, with their 
son, Thomas, father of the subject. 

George E. Hook was reared on the home farm, where he assisted with 
the general work and he was educated in the country district schools 
and the Martinsburg high school. He was married on September 29, 1894, 
to Zona McCamment, daughter of George and Adeline (Wolf) McCamment, 
of Clay township. Both parents are now deceased. Three children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hook, namely : Ella, Jay and Alice. 

Mr. Hook has been very successful in a business way and, by frugality, 
indomitable energy and straightforward dealings with his fellow men, he has 
become one of the substantial young farmers of the township, being the owner 
of a fertile, well improved and well-kept farm of four hundred acres, lying 
two and one-half miles southeast of Martinsburg. Here he carries on general 
farming and stock raising on an extensive scale and he feeds large numbers 
of live stock for the market, no small part of his annual income being de- 
rived from this source. 

Politically, Mr. Hook is a Republican and he has taken a good citizen's 
interest in the affairs of his township and county. He has served as town- 
ship trustee for a period of ten years consecutively, which is certainly a criter- 
ion of his high standing among his neighbors. He is also a member of the 
township board of education and has always been known as a man of pro- 
gressive ideas. He is an advocate of public improvements of all kinds — 
good roads, better schools and public buildings, in fact, everything that tends 
to uplift the people. 



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464 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

CHRIS E. DUDGEON. 

It is a well authenticated fact that success comes not as the caprice of 
chance, but as the legitimate result of well applied energy, unflagging deter- 
mination and perseverance in a course of action once decided upon by the 
individual. Only those who diligently seek the goddess Fortuna, find her; 
she was never known to smile upon the idler. The subject of this sketch 
clearly understood this fact early in life when he was casting about for a 
legitimate and promising line to follow% and in tracing his life history it is 
plainly seen that the prosperity he enjoys has been won by commendable 
qualities, and it is also his personal worth which has gained for him the good 
standing among his fellow citizens in Clay township, where he owns a valua- 
ble farm. 

Mr. Dudgeon is the scion of one of the sterling pioneer families of 
Knox county, and he was bom here on September 7, 1875, ^" the farm where 
he still lives. He is the son of Timothy and Lovey (Campbell) Ehidgeon, the 
father born in Auglaize county, Ohio, and the mother in Ktiox county, and 
here they have devoted their lives to farming, the father becoming one of the 
large landowners and substantial citizens of Clay township, and he carried on 
general farming and stock raising on an extensive scale, his home farm of 
three hundred and seventy acres comprising some of the best land in the 
county. He led a quiet life, and although he was a strong Democrat he 
never held office. His death occurred in February, 1910. His widow sur- 
vives. Two children were bom to them, Scott, of this review, and Christo- 
pher, who is married and living on a part of the homestead. This land was 
first entered from the government by the father of Margaret Elliott, wife of 
Charles Dudgeon, grandfather of the subject, the elder Dudgeon having 
moved his family to Clay township in pioneer days. 

Mr. Dudgeon was reared on the home farm and assisted with the gen- 
eral work there during his boyhood and he attended the country district 
schools. He was married on February 16, 1898, to Margaret Ely, daughter 
of Homer and Dorcas (Veatch) Ely, of Harrison township. These parents 
are both deceased. They were highly esteemed people in their community. 
The father devoted his life to farming and established a good home. Two 
daughters have been born to the subject and wife, Ruth and Grace. 

Since his marriage Mr. Dudgeon has lived on one hundred and forty 
acres, a part of the old home farm, which he has kept well improved and well 
cultivated and has so skillfully rotated his crops and employed the best of 
the modern methods of farming that the land has not been depleted in 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 465 

Strength, retaining its original fertility. In connection with general farming 
he raises various kinds of live stock, of excellent grades. He has been a 
Democrat since reaching maturity, but has never been a public man. He is a 
member of the township board of elections, having held this position for 
eight years. In his fatemal relations he belongs to the Bladensburg Grange, 
Patrons of Husbandry. 



CORWIN D. MOREY. 

Among the honored veterans of the greatest war in all history and one 
of the respected citizens of Milford township, Knox county, w^ho, for many 
reasons, are entitled to specific mention in this history is Corwin D. Morey. 
All honor is due the brave boys in blue who, when slavery and treason was 
rife in the land and the very foundations of the Union threatened, laid aside 
personal consideration, forsook home and fireside, the field or the mart, and 
went to the bloody arena in the Southland, gallantly offering their services 
and their lives, if need be, in order that "the government for the people and 
by the people might not perish from the earth,'' in the language of the great 
martyred leader of that period. 

Mr. Morey was born in Milford township, this county, November 26, 
1846. He is the son of Joseph and Rhoda (Dailey) Morey. The father was 
born in Vermont in 1800 and the mother was born in Virginia in 18 10. The 
father came to Ohio when but a boy and the mother was also a child when 
she arrived in this county. Here they grew to maturity and were married 
and began life on a farm which they became owners of and had a good home. 
Two children were born to them, Rosa T., and Corwin D., of this sketch. 
The father was a Republican and was active in the aflfairs of his township, 
though he never sought office. He belonged to the Congregational church, 
while she belonged to the Disciples church. They had both been married be- 
fore, and he had three children by his first wife and she three by her first 
husband. The death of Joseph Morey occurred in 1880 and the mother of 
the subject died about 1900. 

Corwin D. Morey was educated in the public schools of Milford town- 
ship and he was reared on the home farm. He took up farming early in life, 
and after the war he rented his father's place, in Milford township, later pur- 
chasing it, seventy acres, and put good buildings on the same and here made 
a success as a general farmer and has made this his home to the present time. 
He has kept the old place well improved and well cultivated so that it has 
retained its original fertility. 



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466 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

When the Civil war began Mr. Morey wanted to enlist, but was not old 
enough to bear arms, so he waited patiently and finally, on May 4, 1864, he 
enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Forty-second Ohio Volunteer In- 
fantry, and served with much credit one hundred days or until September 4th 
of the same year, in the Army of the Potomac, in front of Petersburg. He 
re-enlisted on January 27, 1865, in the Sixth Independent Company of Ohio 
Sharpshooters, serving with the Army of the Cumberland till the close of the 
war. 

Mr. Morey was married in 1872 to Sarah L. Bishop, a native of Knox 
county, and the daughter of Arnold Bishop, one of the three brothers who 
first settled here, and Mrs. Morey here grew to womanhood and received her 
education. 

To the subject and wife five children have been born, namely: Roy C, 
who married Kitten Brazil, was a soldier in Company L, Fourth Ohio Volun- 
teer Infantry, in the Spanish-American war, seeing service with the army in 
Porto Rico: Ethel L. is the wife of Clarence Coe; Pearl C. was next in order 
of birth : Raymond B. is in the marine service of the United States and is at 
present located at Portsmouth, New Hampshire; Madge E. is the wife of 
Melvin Fry. 

Politically, Mr. Morey is a Republican and is a member of the school 
board. He is a member of the Disciples church. He is a member of the 
Grange, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Rebekahs. 



ELMER ELLSWORTH HOLLISTER. 

The agricultural interests of Knox county have no better representatives 
than her native-born citizens, many of whom are classed among its most 
practical, enterprising and successful farmers. One of this number is Elmer 
Ellsworth Hollister, of Milford township, who, dependent largely upon his 
own resources from boyhood, has so applied his energies and ability as to 
attain a success worthy the name, while his high standing in the community 
indicates the objective appreciation of his sterling character. 

Mr. Hollister was born in Liberty township, this county, December 2, 
1861. He is the son of Orange and Loduskey (Osborne) Hollister. The 
paternal grandparents. Harmon and Mahala (Bird) Hollister, were early 
settlers in Liberty township, where they had a good farm, and there they 
died. The maternal grandparents, John and Nancy Osborne, came from 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 467 

Pennsylvania to Morrow county, Ohio, in an early day and there spent the 
balance of their lives. 

The father of the subject was born in Liberty township, this county, in 
1834, and the mother was born in Mt. Liberty in 1843. They were married 
in the latter place and they spent their lives on the small farm which they 
owned. Their family consisted of three children, two of whom are living, 
Elmer E., of this review, and Emma A., Alonzo, the third in order of 
birth, being deceased. Politically, the father was a stanch Republican, but 
he never held office or aspired to public honors. He and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church at Mt. Liberty. His death occurred 
in 1875, but his widow still survives. 

Elmer E. Hollister was reared on the farm and he received his educa- 
tion in the common schools, the Red Hill school house, Morrow county. He 
started in life for himself by working out by the month, then he rented land 
for eight years, thereby getting a good start. His wife then inherited a farm 
in Milford township and there they now own seventy-four acres of excellent 
land on which they make a comfortable living and have a good home there. 
In connection with general farming, stock raising is carried on. 

Mr. Hollister is a Republican, and both belong to the Baptist church at 
Lock, and they also belong to the Grange, and the Red Men. 

Mr. Hollister was married on June 3, 1883, to Hattie Larimore. who 
was born on October i, 1859, on the farm where the subject now lives and 
here she grew to womanhood and received her education in the neighboring 
schools. She is the daughter of Isaac and Mary Larimore, old settlers here, 
the father born in Virginia and the mother in Licking county, Ohio. Isaac 
larimore was born in 1821 and he came to Knox county about 1843 ^^^ 
here was married. He was a successful farmer, a large landowner and a 
well known and well liked citizen. His family consisted of eleven children, 
five of whom are living, Joseph M.. Hattie, James, William and Rose C, wife 
of F. M. Sutton, of Knox county. Politically, Mr. larimore was a Demo- 
crat, but was never an office seeker. He was a member of the Methodist 
church. His death occurred in 1905 ; his wife was born in 1829 and she died 
in 1909. 

The parental grandparents of Mrs. Hollister, James and Naomi Lari- 
more, were natives of Virginia, in which state they lived and died. They 
never lived in Knox county, but they made a visit here. The maternal grand- 
parents of Mrs. Hollister, Joseph and Mary Montonja, were natives of Vir- 
ginia. Each came to Licking county single, but were widower and widow at 
the time of their marriage. 



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468 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

LEVI S. BURGER. 

One of our most worthy and highly respected pioneers is Levi S. Burger, 
of Pike township, one of the best known men of the northern part of Knox 
county. He has Hved most of his long and useful life in this locality which 
he has seen developed from a sparsely settled wilderness and in which trans- 
formation he has taken no small part, having been a hard worker and a 
public-spirited man, who believed in encouraging industry and right living 
in others and fostering material and public improvements while advancing 
his own interests. He talks interestingly of the olden days when the country 
was new, conditions different, customs not the same as they are today, — in 
fact, when everything was changed. Now that the mellow Indian summer 
of his years has settled serenely around him he is living a quiet life, leaving 
the active management of his farmstead to others of his family, enjoying a 
well earned rest, and he can look back over his life path, flecked with sun- 
shine and shadow, with no compunction for misdeeds and no regrets for un- 
gentlemanly acts, and he therefore merits the high esteem in which he is held 
by all. 

Mr. Burger was born in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, March 9, 1833, 
and is the son of Jacob and Susanna (Rush) Burger. His paternal grand- 
father, Abraham Burger, most probably came to this country from Ger- 
many in an early day, locating in Pennsylvania and there lived and died. The 
maternal grandfather, George Rush, was a native of Germany, who came to 
America in early life, spending the remainder of his years in Pennsylvania. 
The father of the subject was bom in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, and the 
mother in Center county, that state, and there they grew up and were mar- 
ried, living there until 1835, when they moved to Knox county, Ohio, and 
here he bought land which his brother had entered from the government and 
which is still owned by the Burger family. Here he established a good home 
and spent the rest of his life. Politically, he was a I>emocrat and was at one 
time supervisor, but he led a quiet life. Ten children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Jacob Burger, six of whom are still living. 

Levi S. Burger was educated in the public schools of Knox county and 
reared on the home farm, having been about two years old when he was 
brought here by his parents. The country being new, he had to work hard 
when a boy and he quite naturally took to farming for a livelihood : later he 
bought out the other heirs after the father's death and he is now the owner 
of one hundred and sixty acres in Pike township, which he has kept well im- 
proved and under a high state of cultivation and on which he has made a 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 469 

good living at general farming and stock raising. When he first came to 
this place only half an acre was cleared. The rude house and bam that was 
there gave way in due course of time to six more substantial buildings. 

Politically, Mr. Burger is a Democrat. He has been school director, 
also supervisor for ten years, and he has served on the grand jury frequently. 
He has been living retired for some time and his sons have operated the place. 
He purchased a very cozy dwelling in North Liberty some time ago. He and 
his wife are members of the Brethren church. 

Mr. Burger was married in 1859 to Catherine Wolford, a native of 
Wayne county, and the daughter of George Wolford, one of the old settlers 
there. Children have been bom to Levi S. Burger arid wife, named as 
follows: George, Joseph and John are deceased; Ella, Blanche, E>ella, Alli- 
son P., Jacob, James, Edward and William A. 



CLARENCE D. S WETLAND. 

Energy, sound judgment and persistency of effort, properly applied, will 
always win the goal sought in the sphere of human endeavor, no matter what 
the environment may be or what obstacles are met with, for they who are 
endowed with such characteristics make of their adversities stepping-stones 
to higher things. These reflections are suggested by the career of Clarence D. 
Swetland, one of the enterprising and progressive farmers and stock raisers of 
Wayne township, Knox county, who has not permitted obstacles to thwart 
him in his life purpose, but has forged ahead in spite of them and is today one 
of the representative citizens of his community. 

Mr. Swetland was bom on August i, 1863, in Sparta, Morrow county, 
Ohio. He is the son of William and Cornelia (Hulse) Swetland, both natives 
of Morrow county, where they grew^ up, were educated, married and, in fact, 
have spent their lives, the father yet living on the. farm where he was bom; 
the mother also survives. They are well known and prosperous citizens of 
that locality. 

The son, Qarence D., of this review, spent his boyhood and youth on 
the home farm and there he began working as soon as old enough. He re- 
ceived his education in the country district schools of Morrow county, and 
on November 19, 1S84, he was married to Clara B. Rood, daughter of Will- 
iam H. and Mariah (Bell) Rood, of Wayne townhip, Knox county. Her 
father was bom in Fayette county, Ohio, and the mother was a native of Ire- 
land. 



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470 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Swetland, namely : Edith, 
Roscoe and Florence. Edith married Ray B. Dickson December 21, 191 1, and 
Roscoe married Hazel Trobridge November 8, 191 1. 

For a period of five years after their marriage the subject and wife lived 
on the home farm in Morrow county, and in 1890 they moved to their present 
farm of two hundred acres of fine fertile land three miles southwest of Fred- 
ericktown, Knox county. Mr. Swetland has been a hard worker and has 
managed well, his place being under a high state of improvement and culti- 
vation. He believes in employing modem methods of agriculture, carefully 
studying all phases of modern farming, in connection with which he raises all 
kinds of live stock, specializing in sheep raising. He has a large, comfortable 
home and substantial outbuildings and everything about his place denotes 
that a gentleman of thrift and good taste has its management in hand. 

Politically, Mr. Swetland is a Democrat, and while he takes the interest 
of a loyal and public-spirited citizen in public affairs, he has never been an 
aspirant for political honors or the emoluments of offices within the gift of 
the people, though he has served as a member of the township board of edu- 
cation. He is a member of Fredericktown Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and he is one of the promoters and directors of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Fredericktown. His support may always be depended upon 
in movements having as their object the betterment of conditions, especially 
educational, of his community and he is in every way worthy of the high 
esteem in which he is held by all who know him. 



MAX MEYERS. 



No people that go to make up our cosmopolitan civilization have better 
habits of life than those who came originally from the German empire. They 
and their descendants are distinguished for their thrift and honesty, and these 
two qualities in the inhabitants of any country will in the end alone make 
that country great. When with these two qualities is coupled the other 
quality of soimd sense, which all the Germanic race seems to possess to a 
large degree, there are afforded such qitalities as will enrich any land and 
place it at the top of the countries of the world in the scale of elevated hu- 
manity. Of this excellent people came Max Meyers, prosperous business 
man and influential citizen of Mt. Vernon, Knox county. He comes of a 
race that produced the famous **Iron Chancellor,'' the greatest statesman, all 



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MAX MEYERS 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 47 1 

things considered, that ever walked this terrestrial footstool. He comes (of a 
race that is noted for its original investigations in the problems of civiliied 
life — such men as Goethe and Heckel, Schiller and Beethoven. The Ger- 
manic blood is found in many of the greatest men and woipeti^f this and 
former decades, and the subject of this sketch may well be proud of his de- 
scent from such a race. 

Mr. Meyers was bom on November 17, 1843, in Prussia, near Berlin, 
Germany. He is the son of Herman and Rose Meyers and was one of a 
family of nine sons and one daughter. The father was a tailor and for many 
years followed his trade in the city of Berlin. The son, Max, was educated 
in the schools of Berlin, and when only fourteen years of age he began 
clerking in a store, where he remained three years. He then became a 
traveling salesman for a tobacco firm and this he followed with success until 
he was twenty -one years of age, when he emigrated to America, landing in 
Nfew York on July 3, 1865, with nothing but the clothing he wore, his strong 
body and an ambition to work and succeed. He could speak no English, 
and he was forced to take any employment he could get. His first job in the 
new world was in a hat and cap factory, where he remained until the season 
closed in January, 1866, having advanced to the position of shipping clerk, 
and during that time became acquainted with our language. He then went 
to Hornellsville, New York, where he took a position as clerk in a clothing 
store, later driving a wagon with a man who sold tinware over the country 
and buying junk at the same time, also hides, furs, etc. Here he re- 
mained until 187 1, when his employer came to Columbus, Ohio, bringing 
Mr. Meyers with him and he continued in that gentleman's employ until 
1872. He also worked in Cincinnati for a time, but cast his lot wHth the 
people of Mt. Vernon in 1872 and here he has since remained, having begun 
business for himself. He first started with a peddling cart, selling tinware 
and glassware or trading it for junk. His business prospered until he had 
several wagons on the road selling tinware and gathering junk, hides and 
furs. His teams and wagons traveled over this section of the state for about 
twenty years, his business prospering all the while. In 1874 he added a 
stove and tinware store to his business and later a plumbing department, 
and by fair dealing and close attention to business all of his enterprises pros- 
[>ered. After discontinuing his road wagons, about 1894, he gave all his at- 
tention to his store and plumbing business, which has long since grown to 
large proportions, and which he still continues. However, in 1908, he turned 
over the plumbing department to his sons, George R. and Joseph H , who 
are both practical workmen and who carry on that department of the busi- 

(31) 



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472 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

ness in a most successful and able manner, the elder Meyers giving his en- 
tire attention to his tin and stove business. The former line is conducted by 
the sons under the firm name of the Knox Plumbing & Heating Company. The 
subject also has other business interests. He owns and occupies a large, sub- 
stantial and modern business building at the corner of Gambier and Sandusky 
streets, his attractive, up-to-date residence occupying the opposite corner of 
the street. He has been very successful in all his undertakings and, having 
been a man of integrity and straightforward principles, he has won the con- 
fidence and respect of all who know him and is in every w'ay deserving of 
the large success which is today his. 

Mr. Meyers was married on October 25, 1868, to Sarah Shaw, of 
Homellsville, New York, and to this union six children have been bom, 
three of whom are living at this writing; they were named as follows: 
George R. and Joseph H., who are associated with their father in business: 
Cora married Carl Ackerman, of Columbus; Charles ?nd Elizabeth are de- 
ceased, and one child died in infancy*. 

Mr. Meyers is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and the Masonic order. Politically, he is a Democrat and has long been an 
influential factor in local politics and a leader in public affairs. For a period 
of ten years he served as a member of the city council of Mt. Vernon, repre- 
senting the second ward in an able and praiseworthy manner, and in 1909 
he was a member of the city board of real estate appraisers. He is the only 
member of the family who came to America and he is glad he came. He is 
a fine example of what thrift, energy and honesty can accomplish when 
rightly directed, notwithstanding early handicaps. 



ROBERT S. GAINES. 

The name of Robert S. Gaines, of Howard township, is too well known 
to the people of Knox county to need much comment, for the readers of this 
work nearly all know him as an excellent representative of the better class of 
farmers and stock men of the United States. However, he is at present 
living in practical retirement, after a long life of industry. He comes from 
an ancestry that figlired more or less prominently in the aflfairs of the country 
in pioneer days and it would seem that he has inherited many of their sterling 
traits which have giu'ded him in useful and successful channels. Mr. Gaines 
has dignified his every station in life with a charm that has constantly added 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 473 

to his personal worth and has discharged the duties of citizenship with the 
earnestness and loyalty characteristic of the true American. His popularity 
extends wherever he is known, his probity is recognized by his fellow men, 
and his sterling character both as a private citizen and public servant has 
won him the lasting regard of the people of his township and county. 

Mr. Gaines was born on October 4, 1843, o" ^ farm in Brown township, 
this county, four miles north of Howard. He is the son of Thomas B. and 
Susanna (Burkholder) Gaines, both natives of Rockingham county, Vir- 
ginia, where they grew up, were educated and married. They emigrated to 
Knox county, Ohio, in April, 1834, and settled in Brown township when the 
country was new and little developed and here they worked hard to get a 
start, but in due course of time had a good home, in fact, the elder Gaines 
became a large land owner and prosperous farmer. He was an extensive 
sheep raiser, being among the first large sheep raisers of this county, assisting 
to further an industry for which the Buckeye state has been noted for three- 
quarters of a century. His stock and wool clips were always high grade and 
found ready markets. Although a Virginian by birth and his father a slave 
owner, Thomas B. Gaines was not an adherent of the customs prevailing in 
the Old Dominion, but was a Republican in politics and he was active in the 
affairs of his township and county, holding various local offices. His death 
occurred here on July 26, 1876, his wife having preceded him to the grave 
only a few days. They were the parents of eight children, namely: Jacob, 
of Mt. Vernon; John C., of Danville; Sarah, who married H. H. Workman; 
Joannah is deceased; Mary E. married Worthington Hyatt; Robert S., of 
this sketch; Louisa married H. C. White, of Brown township; Uriah lives in 
Mt. Vernon. 

Robert S. Gaines grew up on the home farm, where he early in life be- 
came acquainted with hard work. In the winter time he attended the public 
schools of his district. On October 20, 1869, he was united in marriage with 
Isabelle Baker, daughter of Joseph and Margaret (Love) Baker, of Union 
township, and to this union seven children were born, named as follows: 
Thomas, of Danville; Joseph, of Brown township: Chaney, of Danville; 
Elizabeth married Elmer Parker, of Howard township; Harry, of Danville; 
Sherman, of Harrison township. 

Mr. Gaines began his married life on the farm adjoining the home place 
in Howard township, and engaged in general farming, stock raising and 
feeding, and for many years he was engaged in buying and shipping all kinds 
of live stock in the east end of Knox county, becoming widely known as an 



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474 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

excellent judge of stock and a fair and square dealer. He had a fine farm 
and kept it well improved and under a high state of cultivation, at one time 
being an extensive land owner, but in recent years he has reduced his hold- 
ings and business cares, retaining only eighty-eight acres, and is practically 
retired from all activities, as before intimated. He has a splendid place and 
is enjoying the fruits of his earlier years of toil. The death of his wife oc- 
curred in October, 1904, since which time he has made his home with his 
daughter, Mrs. Parker. He was also extensively engaged in wool buying for 
many years, being an expert judge of this commodity. 

Politically, Mr. Gaines is a Republican and has always been very active 
and influential in party affairs and public matters. Though he has never 
been an office seeker, he has filled a number of township offices, such as a 
member of the township school board, which position he occupied for a num- 
ber of years. He has always been alert to the best interests of the county. 
Religiously, he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, faithful in 
the work and support of the same, his wife having also held membership in 
this denomination. 



GEORGE J. EWERS. 



Among the substantial men whose labor and influence have given im- 
petus to the agricultural interests of Middlebury township and to the public 
improvement of Knox county, is George W. Ewers, who, while laboring for 
his individual advancement, has never lost sight of his duties to his neighbors 
and the general public, and he is therefore held in the highest esteem by all 
classes. 

Mr. Ewers was born in Brown township, this county, on April i, 1848. 
He is the son of George, Sr., and Elizabeth (Johnson) Ewers, the father 
born in Middlebury township, Kinox county, Ohio, May 2^, 1812, and the 
mother in Vermont in 181 3. The paternal grandfather was David Ewxrs, 
a native of Virginia, from which state he emigrated to Knox county, Ohio, 
in 1810, when this country was a wilderness and the home of the red men. 
who were none too friendly. He married Menassa Baldwin, member of a 
Quaker family. The maternal grandparents were James and Abigail John- 
son, who came from Vermont and settled in Middlebury township, Knox 
county, Ohio, in an early day, and here entered land from the government 
which they cleared and improved. Of this the father of the subject owned 
ninety-six acres. George Ewers, Sr., was first a Whig and later a Republi- 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 475 

can. He was a hardworking, homeloving man and, like his father before 
him, enjoyed the respect of all who knew him. His family consisted of three 
sons, namely: George J., of this sketch; William O. and James E., both 
soldiers in the Union army, died toward the close of the war, 1864, while in 
the service, their deaths having occurred within two days, due to typhoid 
fever. The mother of these children died in 1875, ^^^ father surviving until 
1 891. 

George J. Ewers, of this sketch, grew up on the home farm, where he 
made himself useful as a boy during the crop seasons, attending the Cay wood 
school house in the wintertime. Later, having had a bent toward the law, he 
began reading Blackstone, and attended the law department of the University 
of Michigan for one term, but not finding a legal career entirely to his liking 
he took up teaching in the schools near his home, which he followed suc- 
cessfully for four terms, giving much promise as an educator ; but the freer 
life of the agriculturist finally lured him back to the soil, and he purchased 
ninety-six acres of the home place, of his father, and to this he later added 
seventy-seven and one-half acres, now owning one of the choice farms of 
Middlebury township, which he has kept well improved and under a high state 
of cultivation, employing modern methods of farming and stock raising, and 
he has met with uniform success. Everything about his place denotes thrift, 
prosperity and good management. 

Mr. Ewers has long manifested an abiding interest in public affairs, 
and is an influential factor in local Republican politics. He has served as jus- 
tice of the peace, as trustee and treasurer of Middlebury township, giving 
eminent satisfaction as an able and conscientious public servant to all con- 
cerned, irrespective of party alignment. As a justice his decisions were al- 
ways characterized by fairness to all concerned, with a splendid conception of 
the law, and they have seldom met with reversal at the hands of a higher 
tribunal. 

On December i8, 1877, Mr. Ewers was united in marriage with Niettie 
Adams, who was boni in Berlin township, Knox county, Ohio, on September 
13, 1854. She is the daughter of Jacob and Sabrey (Brown) Adams, a 
highly esteemed family here. She grew to womanhood and received her edu- 
cation in her native county. These parents were natives of Berlin township, 
this county. To Mr. and Mrs. Ewers four children have been born, named as 
follows: Frank, who is a graduate of Berea College, Kentucky, and of the 
JeflFerson Medical College, Philadelphia, is now a practicing physician at 
Akron, Ohio. The second son, James E., is a successful lawyer in Boston, 
Massachusetts, having graduated from Yale University and Yale Law School. 
Floyd was the third in order of birth, and Walter, the youngest, is deceased. 



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476 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

Mr. Ewers is a well educated man and an advocate of higher learning; 
he has given his children every opportunity in educational matters, and they 
are thus exceptionally well equipped for life's duties. 

Th6 paternal grandparents of Mrs. Ewers, John and Catherine Adams, 
came to Knox county, Ohio, from Pennsylvania, driving overland with a team 
and wagon about 181 2, and were thus early pioneers. Jacob Adams was 
bom in 1821 and his death occurred on March 14, 1893; his wife, Sabrey 
Brown, was born on February 20, 1829, and her death occurred in 1902. 

In every-day life, George J. Ewxrs is a man whose word is as good, if 
not better, than the bond of most men. Honesty and integrity are no mean- 
ingless terms w ith him and his records as a man and citizen are without blem- 
ish. He is a leader in this part of the county in public aflfairs, and because of 
his interest in all that makes for the good of the county, his industry and 
genial address, his unassuming nature and his loyalty to all that is ennobling 
and in harmony with the right as he sees and understands the right, have 
made him esteemed with a wide circle of friends and acquaintances. 



RICHARD D. PURDY. 

The subject of this review^ is a gentleman of high standing to whom has 
not been denied a full measure of success. He is one of the representative 
farmers of Clay township, having long been a recognized factor of import- 
ance in connection with not only the agricultural interests of this and other 
sections, but has also been identified with the growth and prosperity of the 
vicinities where he has been pleased to reside. He is a connecting link between 
the pioneer epoch and the present period, his family having been early resi- 
dents of the Buckeye state. 

Richard D. Purdy was born on November 9, 1833, ^" ^ farm in Holmes 
county, Ohio. He is the son of Elijah and Clarinda (Baljcock) Purdy, the 
father born in Wayne county, Pennsylvania, and the mother in Coshocton 
county, Ohio. The father came to Holmes county, Ohio, about 1818, when 
eighteen years of age, his parents both being deceased, and here he engaged in 
farm w^ork, the country then being little developed. He devoted his life to 
farming and was also a minister in the old-school Baptist church. He spent 
the remainder of his life in Holmes county and there his death occurred on 
October 16, 1872, his widow surviving until in July, 1876. They were the 
parents of ten children, six sons and four daughters. Six of them are now 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 477 

living, namely: Richard D., of this review, is the oldest of the sons living; 
Julia Ann, the oldest of the children, resides in Carthage, Missouri, at the 
advanced age of ninety years, being the widow of Dr. D. B. Stickney; 
Ephraim hves in Vanwert county, Ohio; Mercy Jane is the widow of Em- 
manuel Shaffer, of Allen county, Ohio; Eliah lives in Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania ; John C. lives in Harrison township, this county ; those deceased are 
Lucinda, Ruth, Edward and Ozias Wilson. 

Richard D. Purdy was reared on the farm and was educated in the 
country district schools, but his education was limited. When eighteen years 
of age he began learning the carpenter's trade and he worked at that for 
forty years in many counties in Ohio and Kansas, also Missouri and Indiana. 
Being a skilled workman, his services were always in great demand, and many 
are the substantial dwellings, barns and business houses over the country- that 
stand today as monuments to his skill as a builder. 

Mr. Purdy was married on February 8, 1854, to Rachael Purdy, who 
was bom November 28, 1833, the daughter of Nathaniel and Clara (Nichol- 
son) Purdy, of Holmes county, this family having originally come from 
Wayne county, Pennsylvania. 

Seven children have l^een lx)rn to the subject and wife, namely: Julia A. 
is the wife of Simon J. Dudgeon, of Gambier; Clarenda V. married Abraham 
Morningstar, of Gambier; Jasper N. lives in Allen county, Ohio; Emory E. 
lives in the state of Washington; John C. lives in Clay township, this county; 
Chauncey V. lives in Pleasant township, this county ; Henry V^alentine lives in 
Centerburg. There has not been a death in the family. 

After his marriage Mr. Purdy settled in Allen county, Ohio, in the 
woods and there began clearing the land, and in time he had a good farm 
which he superintended, but also carried on his trade of carpenter. From 
there he moved to Jefferson county, Kansas, in 1864, where he became the 
owner of a farm and in connection with it followed his trade. The health 
of himself and family not being of the best in the Sunflower state, they re- 
turned to Ohio in 1866, locating in Harrison township, Knox county, where 
he bought a farm and also followed carpentering. In 1876 he bought his 
present farm in^Clay township and soon thereafter moved his family to the 
same and here he has since resided. For a number of years after moving 
here he followed carpenter contracting. He became the owner of two hun- 
dred and thirty-four acres of land, but he has disposed of his land until 
he now has but one hundred and twenty acres. It is well improved and un- 
der a high state of cultivation, and here he carries on general farming and 
stock raising, making a specialty of sheep. He has a large, substantial and 



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478 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

attractive home and good buildings of all kinds on his place. His home is 
two miles north of Martinsburg. 

Politically, Mr. Purdy is a Democrat and he has served as justice of the 
peace, also as a member of the local board of education. He has kept well 
informed on public questions and has ever manifested an interest in public 
matters. He and part of his family are members of the Baptist church and 
they are prominent in all circles in which they move. 



LORAN E. MAHAN. 



This well known citizen is another of the old soldiers who went out to 
fight their country's battles nearly fifty yearsago. What a splendid sight it is 
at the present day to see a company of these old soldiers go by on Decoration 
day or the Fourth of July, in their faded uniforms and with their tattered 
flags flying. But they will soon be gone forever, and nothing will be left 
but a memory. That memory should be something more than a sound. Their 
deeds should be perpetuated in song and story, in monument and perpetual 
commemoration, so that the future generations may draw inspiration from 
their patriotism and gallantry. 

One of the honored veterans of that great war is Loran E. Mahan, 
farmer of Miller township, Knox county, who was bom on June 3, 1848. in 
Milford township, this county. He is the son of Edgar and Weltha (Ellis) 
Mahan, both natives of Geneseo county, New York, and there they grew to 
maturity, received their education and were married. The father learned the 
shoemaker's trade, and he also farmed many years. His death occurred 
about 1880, his widow sur\'iving a number of years. 

Loran E. Mahan was reared on the home farm, where he worked when 
of proper age and he received his education in the common schools, though 
he never attended school after he was fourteen years of age. When the Civil 
war came on he wanted to go to the front, but was not old enough, so he 
waited patiently as the war progressed and when fifteen years old he en- 
listed in Company H, Eighty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served 
under General Sherman in his campaign about Atlanta and was with him on 
the memorable march to the sea, and until the close of the war, which found 
him in the Carolinas. He was wounded at the battle of Averasborough, 
North Carolina, in March, 1865. but continued with his regiment, never 
missing a day's duty while in the service, and he proved to be as faithful a 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 479 

soldier as any of the veterans in his regiment. After the dose of the war he 
returned to the home farm in Knox county, where he continued to work until 
his marriage, on December 31, 1872, to Almeda Harris, daughter of Emer B. 
and Polly Ann (E)ailey) Harris, of Liberty township, an early pioneer family 
from Virginia. 

Two daughters and one son have been born to the subject and wife, 
namely: Anna, who married Thomas Robblee, of Lincoln, Nebraska; 
Weltha married Edward Paswater, of Lincoln, Nebraska; Ralph L. lives in 
Malcolm, Nebraska. 

After his marriage Mr. Mahan went to Champaign county, Illinois, 
where he remained four years, then went to Lancaster county, Nebraska, and 
continued to reside there until 1909, when he and his wife returned to Miller 
township, Knox county, Ohio. While living in Nebraska he engaged in 
farming and in breeding registered Jersey cattle and Essex hogs. He was an 
extensive breeder and became widely known as such. At the Columbian Ex- 
position at Chicago, 1893, Perhaps the greatest world's fair ever held, he 
made seventeen entries of his thoroughbred hogs, and he had the good fortune 
to carry away seventeen prizes, thirteen of which were first prizes. Nine 
herds were competing. He was also an exhibitor at various state fairs and 
was always a prize winner. He was also extensively engaged in the dairy 
business with Lincoln, Nebraska, as his market point, among the families he 
furnished being that of William J. Bryan, who was a customer for several 
years. Mr. Mahan was also a large land owner and engaged in general farm- 
ing, but it was his fine stock that carried his name broadcast over the country. 
No better judge of live stock could be found than he and he has always been 
a great admirer of good breeds of various kinds of stock. 

Since returning to Miller township, this county, Mr. Mahan bought 
what was known as the Miller farm, deeded to James Miller in 1814, and 
signed by President Madison, and it never changed title and was never mort- 
gaged, until bought by the subject in 1909. This excellent farm contains 
three hundred acres of as valuable land as the county affords, well improved 
and under a high state of cultivation, in fact, one of the choicest farms of the 
county. Mr. Mahan has laid miles of tile in the fields and in every way 
brought the place up to the most advanced standard, and he also carries on a 
system of crop rotation, and is in every way a successful and scientific farmer, 
and he carries on general farming and stock raising on an extensive scale. 
He has also begun fine horse breeding, thoroughbred Belgian horses, there 
being none finer in the state, and because of their superior quality his stock 
are greatly admired by all. He also breeds hig^ grade Delaine sheep. He has 



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480 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

been regarded as one of the most progressive and foremost farmers and 
breeders in whatever community he has lived. 

Politically, Mr. Mahan is a Republican and he has been a loyal party 
man, always interested in public affairs and in whatever tended to promote 
the interests of his community. While living in Nebraska he was many times 
urged to become a candidate for the county offices, but always declined, hav- 
ing never been an office seeker. Fraternally, he is a member of the Lilford 
Grange, Patrons of Husbandry. His fine farm lies five and one-half miles 
southwest of Mt. Vernon and he has a modem, attractive and pleasant home, 
surrounded by large, convenient bams, stock sheds and various outbuildings ; 
he has replaced all the deficient structures on the farm with substantial ones, 
and everything about the place denotes thrift, good management and pros- 
perity. 

Personally, Mr. Mahan is an obliging, unassuming, public-spirited gentle- 
man whose integrity is unquestioned. 



JAMES OOLGIN. 



It is no doubt true that Ireland, of all countries of the world, has sent 
more emigrants in proportion to population to the United States than any 
other country, and the reason is well known. For hundreds of years the 
Emerald Isle has been denied many valuable rights and privileges by Great 
Britain, and the pride and honor of the people were ground into the dust. 
They could avoid all this only by leaving the island, much as they loved it, 
and accordingly thousands of them, as the years rolled round, have crossed 
the wide Atlantic to find a home of greater freedom in America. They began 
to come in large numbers after the Revolution and have continued to come 
until the present time. In every state they have settled and built up com- 
fortable homes. They were among our first teachers and business men, and 
today they occupy many of the proudest positions within the gift of the in- 
habitants. 

In the northern part of Erin was born the late James Colgin, long a 
thrifty farmer of Butler township, Knox county, and an honored veteran of 
the Union army. When eleven years of age, he emigrated with his parents, 
Frank and Mary Ann Colgin, to the United States, soon afterwards locating 
in Knox county, Ohio, and here they farmed on rented land until their deaths, 
a few years after establishing their home in the new country. These parents 
had eight children, who grew to maturity, and three of them are still living. 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 48 1 

James Colgin was educated in the common schools of Knox county and 
here grew to manhood. He worked on the farm when a boy, by the month, 
later renting land, and finally, having gotten a start through his industry, he 
purchased a farm north of here. Later selling that, he bought a farm of one 
himdred and eighty-three acres in Butler township on which he placed many 
valuable improvements and made a comfortable living as a general farmer and 
stock raiser, establishing a good home and here he remained until his death, 
on May 4, 1904. 

Mr. Colgin proved his loyalty to his adopted country during our great 
civil strife in the early sixties by enlisting in 1864 in an Ohio regiment and 
he served faithfully in the Federal army for nine months. Politically, he was 
a Republican, and in his fraternal relations was a member of the Masonic 
order. He also belonged to the Grand Army of the Republic. 

Mr. Colgin was married on February 11, 1866, to Mary M. Morning- 
star, who was born November 19, 1842, in Knox county, the daughter of 
William and Susan Momingstar, a highly esteemed old family of this county, 
who caine here ih pioneer days from Pennsylvania. The mother was a mem- 
ber of the Horn family, also prominent in the early life of the locality. Here 
Mrs. Colgin was reared and educated. Since the death of her husband she 
and her sons have operated the place, carrying on the work inaugurated by 
Mr. Colgin in a most praiseworthy manner. 

Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. James Colgin, named as 
follows: William Sherman, Elizabeth Ann, Bertha E., Frank; Arthur, who 
superintends the farm; Benton teaches school and assists on the home farm 
in summer; Garfield was the youngest child. The father was a man whom 
everybody respected, for he had few personal faults and was neighborly, kind 
and generous. 



TORRENCE MITCHELL. 

A representative of one of the old and honored families of Knox county, 
w^hich since pioneer days has been prominently connected with the develop- 
ment and substantial progress of this section of the state, Torrence Mitchell, 
fanner of Milford township, has worthily sustained the good reputation of 
the family through his active and useful life and prominence in connection 
with the agricultural industries of this favored section of the Buckeye state. 
There is utmost compatibility in here entering a brief review of his career, 
and aside from being a valuable and perpetual record, the article will be read 
with interest by the many friends of himself and family. 



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482 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

Mr. Mitchell was bom on the farm he now owns in Mil ford township, 
this county, on April 22, 1851. He is the son of Almon and Margaret (Haw- 
kins) Mitchell. The paternal grandparents, Sylvanus Mitchell and wife, 
were natives of Connecticut, where they spent their early lives, emigrating in 
an early day to Licking county, Ohio, and in 1824 they moved to Knox county 
when neighbors were few and a wild stretch of woods covered the earth. 
Here they established their home and spent the balance of their lives. The 
maternal grandparents, Harrison and Phebe (Lovell) Hawkins, were natives 
of Rhode Island, locating in Milford township with a colony from that state. 
Here Mr. Hawkins entered a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, w^hich he 
cleared, developed and on which he and his wife spent the balance of their 
lives. 

The father of the subject was bom in Licking county, Ohio, in 1816 
and the mother was born in Knox county in 18 18. When eight years old the 
former came to Knox county and here grew to manhood and married and 
devoted his life to general farming and stock raising, being very successful 
and owning four hundred acres of good land at the time of his death. Politi- 
cally, he was a Republican and was more or less active in party affairs. His 
family consisted of thirteen children, twelve of whom grew to maturity and 
were married. Of the number, five sons and two daughters are still living. 
The mother was a member of the Church of Christ. The death of Almon 
Mitchell occurred on April 4, 1896, and his widow survived until in March, 
1901. 

Torrence Mitchell grew up on the home farm and assisted with the 
general routine of work there in his boyhood. He was educated in the public 
schools and in the Galena Academy. He began life for himself by teaching 
school, which vocation he followed for a period of ten years with much suc- 
cess, but he finally tired of the school room and took up farming. He re- 
mained on his father's farm awhile and then went to Tennessee, where he 
remained three years, then, his father urging him to take charge of the home 
farm, he returned here and has since operated the same in a most gratifying 
manner, keeping it well tilled and well improved. This place of one hundred 
and forty-two acres ranks with the best in Milford township. Mr. Mitchell 
also has a farm of one hundred acres in Tennessee. In connection with 
general farming he carries on stock raising, handling some good grades; 
however, he merely oversees the place, leaving the active work of the same to 
his ^on since April i, 19 10. 

Politically, Mr. Mitchell is a Rjepublican and he has held various town- 
ship offices. He is a member of the Grange, the only secret order to which he 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 483 

belongs, and he and his wife belong to the Church of Christ, he having 
been an elder for twenty years. 

Mr. Mitchell was married on October 2y, 1875, to Qara Stevens, a 
native of Knox county, and the daughter of John and Emmeline Stevens, old 
settlers here. Four children have been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell, namely : 
L. Grace, who was graduated from the Centerburg high school and Hiram 
College, has been engaged in social settlement work in Cleveland for the past 
eight years; Laura L. died when eighteen years of age; Margaret S., also a 
graduate of Centerburg high school and Hiram College, is also engaged in 
social settlement work in Cleveland; John S. was graduated from the Mt. 
Vernon high school, also took the short course in agriculture at the Ohio 
State University, and is now operating the home farm and has been very 
successful in carrying out the work inaugurated by his father. 



JOHN A. HICKINBOTHAM. 

Among the substantial farmers and stock men of Morgan township, 
Knox county, who deserve to rank high in the list of twentieth-century til- 
lers of the soil in this nature-favored locality is John A. Hickinbotham, a 
man who has worked hard for that which he now possesses, and knows how 
to appreciate the true dignity of labor and to place a correct estimate upon 
the value of money ; nevertheless, he is liberal in his benefactions and stands 
ever ready to support with his influence and means all measures for the ma- 
terial and moral w^elfare of his community, consequently he is well deserving 
a place in her history. 

Mr. Hickinbotham was born on June 26, 1850, on a farm in Monroe 
county, Ohio. He is the son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Hindley) Hickinbot- 
ham : both parents were of German descent, but they were both bom in Staf- 
fordshire, England, and there they grew up and were married. They emi- 
grated to America early in 1850 and settled in Monroe county, Ohio, where 
they spent the remainder of their lives. 

The subject was reared on the home farm and educated in the public 
schools of Monroe county; however, he is a self-educated man, having at- 
tended the schools in his community only twenty months. He has always 
been a deep student and kept well abreast of the times. He taught school 
successfully for a period of twenty years, his last certificate being dated De- 
cember 28, 1889, good for five years and covered fourteen different branches. 



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484 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

in which he was graded as perfect in every one. He took high rank among 
the successful teachers of his day and his services were in great demand. For 
some time he was principal of the Graysville schools of Monroe county. In 
the fall of 1889 he closed his teaching career by conducting a teachers' nor- 
mal for several months ; he then entered the mercantile business at Graysville, 
Monroe county, and during all these years he was conducting a farm which 
he owned. He maintained his store at Graysville for a year and a half, then 
turned his attention exclusively to fanning and also cared for the home place 
of his father after his mother's death. On his farm oil was developed which 
proved very profitable and in 1902 he left his farm in Monroe county, which 
he afterwards sold, retaining his oil interests and he came to Morgan town- 
ship, Knox county, two miles northwest of Morgan Center, and here he has 
since resided, his place consisting of one hundred and twenty acres, which he 
brought up to a high state of improvement and cultivation, and on which stands 
a modern and attractive home and large, convenient outbuildings. He kee])s 
an excellent grade of live stock of all kinds. 

Mr. Hickinbotham was first married on October 24, 1872, to Phebe 
A. Keyser, daughter of Jesse J. and Lucinda (Riley) Keyser, of Monroe 
county, Ohio, the family l)eing from Belmont county. * One son and one 
daughter were born to this union, John J , of Muskingum county, and Eliza- 
beth J., deceased. The wife and mother passed to her rest on August 23, 
1879, and on April 5, 1880, Mr. Hickinbotham was united in marriage with 
Margaret Daugherty, daughter of Simon and Mary E. (Hilliard) Daughert>', 
of Monroe county, where Mr. Daugherty was born. Mrs. Daugherty was 
born in Pennsylvania. They are now both deceased. Four children were 
born of the second union of the subject, namely : Mary E., who married 
John S. Vance, of Miller township; Thomas S., of Utica, Licking county, 
Ohio: Everetta L. married A. B. Devore, of Morgan township, and Harrison 
H., who lives on the home farm. 

Politically, Mr. Hickinbotham is a Republican and in his younger days 
was active in public aflfairs. He was chainnan of the first Republican central 
committee in Monroe county at a time when that party was very much in 
the minority in Monroe county and for many years he was active in the party 
organization. He served as a member of the board of education at Grays- 
ville, and since coming to Knox county he has been trustee of Morgan town- 
ship. 

Fraternally, Mr. Hickinbotham is a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and the encampment of that order, also the Masonic order 
at Utica, Licking Lodge and chapter, council and commandery of that order 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. ' 485 

at Mt. Vernon, and he is a thirty-second-degree member of the Columbus 
Consistory, and a member of Aladdin Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of No- 
bles of the Mystic Shrine at Columbus. He is also a member of Morgan 
Grange No. 828, Patrons of Husbandry. He and his wife are members of 
the Church of Christ. Personally, he is a man of broad intelligence, pro- 
gressive in all that the term implies, a man of aflfairs, public-spirited, oblig- 
ing and of genial address, being prominent in the life of the community. 



JAMES LEROY SCOTT. 

One of the successful farmers and stock raisers of Milford township, 
Knox county, is James Leroy Scott, who has succeeded at his chosen line 
of endeavor because he has persistently applied himself and has been thwarted 
by obstacles, but, having removed them one by one from his pathway, he has 
ascended to a high rung of success on the ladder on which he started at the 
bottom and he is therefore deserving of the esteem in which he is held by 
his neighbors and many friends. 

Mr. Scott was born in this township on June 29, 1850, and he has been 
content to spend his life in his home comnumity. He is the son of James 
and Sarah (Horn) Scott. His i>arental grandparents, Chinsworth and Jane 
(Fitch) Scott, were natives of Greene county, Pennsylvania, from which 
they came to Knox county, Ohio, about 1840 and settled on land which later 
became a part of Morrow county, and there became very well established on 
their farm, which the elder Scott cleared and on which he raised his family, 
and there he and his wife spent the balance of their lives. The maternal 
grandparents, Jacob and Priscilla Horn, were natives of Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, where they grew up, were married and spent their lives. 

James Scott, father of the subject, was bom in Greene county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1818 and the mother's birth occurred in Washington county, that 
state, in 1820, and they grew up and were married in their native state, com- 
ing to Ohio about 1842 or 1843, ^^' Scott having followed his parents here, 
and he located in Milford township, Knox county, and there he became owner 
of considerable land and was one of the substantial farmers of the township. 
Later, however, reverses which he could not control caused him to lose his 
property. He lived a quiet, retired life. He and his wife belonged to the 
Disciples church. His death occurred in March, 1899. and his wife died in 
May, 1879. They were the parents of five children, three of whom are liv- 



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486 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

ing at this writing, James Leroy, of this review; Corbin, and Priscilla 
Fadely. 

James L. Scott grew up on the home farm and there assisted with the 
general work when a boy, later working by the day and farming on the shares. 
He received such education as he could in the rural schools. In 1878 he 
purchased a farm of seventy-six acres in Milford township, and here he now 
owns seventy-nine acres. This he has placed under excellent improvements 
and cultivation and he has a very comfortable home, and always keeps a good 
grade of live stock in his fields. 

Politically, Mr. Scott is a Democrat, but he has not been especially ac- 
tive in public affairs. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and he and his wife are members of the Disciples church. 

Mr. Scott was married on December 24, 1873, ^^ Mary L. Pickering, who 
was born, reared and educated in Milford township, this county. She is the 
daughter of Lot and Sarah Pickering, old settlers here, the father having come 
from Pennsylvania and the mother from Guernsey county, this state. Two 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Scott, namely : Eldora, who married 
Perley Wright, and Bessie Corinne Scott, who resides at home. 



CHARLES R COLVILLE. 

The names of those men who have distinguished themselves through 
the possession of those qualities which daily contribute to the success of 
private life and to the public stabilit)^ and who have enjoyed the confidence 
and respect of those about them, should not be permitted to perish. Such a 
one is the well-known gentleman whose name initiates this biographical 
review. He is a well-rounded character, in which the different interests of 
life are given their due proportion of attention. For years he has been a 
conspicuous figure in the affairs of Knox county and is widely known as one 
of her most representative citizens. 

Charles F. Colville, of Mt. Vernon, was born November 18, 1858, in 
Pleasant township, this county, and he is the son of Thomas and Sarah 
(Patrick) Colville and the grandson of James and Sarah (Jackson) Colville. 
James Colville was bom near Winchester, Virginia, in 1767. When a young 
man he emigrated to Washington county, Pennsylvania, and remained there 
until 1803, then came to Knox county, Ohio, and located a short distance 
east of Mt. Vernon when this country was a vast forest and wild game and 



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CHARLES F. COLVILLE 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 487 

Indians were frequently encountered. Here the old pioneer built a cabin, 
made a clearing and eventually became extensively engaged in farming. 
He assisted in the survey of the military land in Knox county and was 
prominent in the early affairs of this locality. In the fall of 1806 he re- 
turned to Pennsylvania, and on November 27th of that year he was married 
to Mary Jackson, who was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, on 
October 3, 1781, the daughter of James and Nancy Jackson. Soon after- 
wards he returned with his bride to his Knox county farm. He became 
prominent in county politics and was elected associate judge here in 1808. He 
was a man of sterling qualities and did his full share in inaugurating the 
physical, civic and moral development of this section of the state. His death 
occurred on February 7, 1837. He was the first settler in Pleasant town- 
ship, and the first school in that township was taught in a log cabin on his 
farm in 1825, the teacher being William Marquis. So for more than a 
century that section of Kiiox county has been the home of this excellent 
family. Both Thomas Colville and his son, Charles F., of this review, were 
born and reared here. 

Charles F. Colville grew to manhood on the home farm east of Mt. 
Vernon, attended the district schools during the months that he was not 
engaged in work on the farm, and later he took a course in Kenyon College, 
from which he was graduated in 1880. He then studied law with H. H. 
Greer, of Mt. Vernon, and was admitted to the bar in 1886 and the following 
year he began practicing his profession in Mt. Vernon and followed the same 
with ever increasing success and popularity until 1900, ranking with the 
leaders of the Knox county bar. But large business affairs began to claim 
much of his time and attention and he gave up active practice to devote 
himself to industrial affairs. In 1898 he organized the Knox Building & 
Loan Company, and in 1900 he helped organize the Park-Colville & Herrick 
Company, since moved to Metropolis, Illinois, and known as the Metropolis 
Bending Company, manufacturers of carriage woodwork, which has expe- 
rienced a rapid rise in the manufacturing world, its products, owing to their 
superior qualities, finding a ready market over a vast territory. Mr. Col- 
ville is still secretary and treasurer of the company. He is also secretary of 
the Knox Building and Loan Company, and the pronounced success of both 
have been due in no small measure to his wise counsel and judicious manage- 
ment. He is also a director in the Ktiox National Bank. 

Having long manifested an abiding interest in local public matters, Mr. 
Colville has exerted a potent influence on the civic life of Knox county, ever 
loyal to the tenets of the Republican party. He was mayor of Mt. Vernon 

(32) 



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488 . KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

from 1894 to 1896, and he gave the city one of the best administrations it 
has ever had. Fraternally, he is a member of the Masonic blue lodge. 

In 1887 Mr. Colville was married to Dora Galbreath, of Newark, Ohio, 
the daughter of John G. and Mary (Gibson) Galbreath, the father having 
formerly been a well known merchant of Nfewark. He came to Ohio from 
Washington county, Pennsylvania, and his wife from the adjoining county 
in West Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. Colville belong to the Congregational 
church, in which he is a trustee. 



PERRY L. COVER. 



Perry L. Cover, one of the progressive and well-known farmers and 
stock raisers of the vicinity of Fredericktown, Knox county, is a man who 
believes in doing well whatever he deems worth doing at all, hence his success 
in material things, and he is an advocate of clean politics and wholesome pri- 
vate and social living and as a result of his well-ordered life he is held in 
high esteem by all with whom he has come into contact. 

Mr. Cover was born on November 16, 1866, in Johnsville, Morrow 
county, Ohio. He is the son of Upton A. and Susan Cover, the father bom 
in Maryland, from which state he came to Richland county, Ohio, when a 
child with his parents. The mother of the subject, whose maiden name was 
Lamb, was born in Richland county, this state, and there spent her girl- 
hood. When the father was a young man he launched out in mercantile busi- 
ness with his brother, J. J. Cover, which they followed with continuous suc- 
cess for a period of twenty-seven years, maintaining a large establishment and 
enjoying an extensive trade all the while at Johnsville, Ohio, where the sub- 
ject was born. They kept a general store where the villagers and country 
people could supply their every need and in return they bought everything 
the farmers had to sell, from their live stock and grain down to their butter, 
eggs and poultry. They were the first dealers in this part of the country to 
pack eggs in salt brine pickle, which was in vogue for years, un- 
til supplanted by cold storage. He was a very successful business man, his 
keen discernment and sound judgment never failing him and his courtesy and 
honesty in dealing with his many customers won their good will and friend- 
ship. He was one of seven brothers, all of whom but himself were Republi- 
cans in their political faith, he standing alone as a Democrat. He continued in 
the mercantile business in Johnsville until 1882, when he closed out his busi- 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 489 

ness and purchased a splendid farm a half mile southwest of Fredericktown, 
where he engaged in farming successfully until his death, in April, 1905, his 
wife having preceded him to the grave in August, 1896. They were the parents 
of two daughters and one son, namely : Ernma E. and Mattie E., both de- 
ceased ; and Perry L., of this sketch. 

Perry L. Cover was educated in the schools of Johnsville and Frederick- 
town, Ohio. He worked on his father's farm in his. youth, and after the 
death of the father he took the management of the same and here he has 
remained. This excellent farm, one of the best in Knox county, consists of 
one hundred and forty-three acres, which has been brought to a high state 
of improvement and cultivation and on which the subject has met with con- 
tinued success as a general farmer and stock raiser. He has kept the build- 
ings and fences all up to the standard and has so rotated his crops as to main- 
tain the original fertility of the soil. 

Mr. Cover has never married. Fraternally, he is a mennber of the Ma- 
sonic order at Fredericktown, and the chapter and commandery at Mt. Vernon. 
He is a Democrat in politics, but has never been, an office seeker nor an office 
holder, although he was land appraiser for Wayne township in 1910. 

In addition to his splendid farm in Wayne township, he has other valu- 
able property in Colorado, some farming interests there. He has long mani- 
fested much interest in public improvements and is an advocate of good 
roads, in fact, everything that tends to advance the best interests of the masses. 
He is a man of exemplary habits. 



JOHN R. CESSNA. 



Faithfulness to duty and a strict adherence to a fixed purpose, which al- 
ways do more to advance a man's interests than wealth or advantageous cir- 
cumstances, have been dominating factors in the life of John R. Cessna, well 
known resident of the vicinity of Bladensburg, Jackson township, Knox 
county, where he has spent much of his long and useful life engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits and his career has been replete with honor and success. 

Mr. Cessna was born in Pike township, Coshocton county, Ohio, June 
9, 1844. He is the son of William and Elizabeth (Rine) Cessna. The pa- 
ternal grandparents, John and Mary (McVicker) Cessna, were natives of 
Bedford county, Pennsylvania, and they settled in Coshocton county, Ohio, 
in 1822, developing a farm in Pike township when that part of the Buckeye 



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490 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

state was a wilderness, and they became influential among the pioneers. They 
were the parents of fourteen children, all of whom were born in Pennsylvania 
and thirteen of whom grew to maturity. The death of the grandfather oc- 
curred in 1833, after which his wife and one son moved to Green county, Wis- 
consin, though this was not until 1845, and there she died. The family orig- 
inally came from France, John Cessna having emigrated to America in 1718 
and settled in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, later moving to York county, 
that state, where his death occurred in 1751. Most of his descendants lived 
in Pennsylvania, a large number in Bedford county, for one hundred and 
fifty years. He was a Huguenot and fled from his native land during the great 
religious strife of that period. Some of his descendants have become noted 
leaders in their various communities, two of them having been colonels in 
the Revolutionary^ war, others judges and still others congressmen. The first 
Cessna spent three years in Ireland, where he was an officer, then came to the 
United States. He became an extensive land owner and a prominent citi- 
zen. This family have always been loyal to American institutions and a 
goodly number of them fought in our war for independence. The maternal 
grandparents, John and Matilda (Rine) Cessna, were cousins, and were na- 
tives of Maryland, later coming to Ohio, being very early settlers in Coshoc- 
ton county, entering land in Perry township, and there they spent their last 
days. They were of Ckrman descent. They reared their family in Coshoc- 
ton county and there the father and mother of the subject were married 
in 1842. The father was a stock dealer and farmer. In 1854 he moved to 
Licking county and there his wife died in 1858. They were the parents of 
five children, four sons and one daughter. Only two sons are living, John R., 
of this review, and Rudolph, who lives in Oklahoma. William Cessna again 
married, his second wife being Margaret M. Rine, a sister of his first wife, 
this wedding occurring in 1861. The death of Mr. Cessna occurred on 
October 6, 1865. Politically, he was a Democrat and he took an active part 
in politics. He was a township trustee and a justice of the peace, having 
been incumbent of the latter at the time of his death. He was a man of in- 
fluence in his community and was highly regarded by all who knew him. 

John R. Cessna was educated in the common schools of Coshocton and 
Licking counties, and he l>egan life as a dealer in live stock. For years he 
has followed dealing in horses on an extensive scale and he is widely known 
in this connection, being one of the best judges of the horse that could be 
found in this part of the state. Since 1889 he has very capably and acceptably 
discharged the duties of justice of the peace. His decisions have been char- 
acterized by fairness to all concerned and have seldom met with reversal at the 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 491 

hands of a higher tribunal. In March, 1875, he settled in Pleasant township, 
Knox county, on a rented farm and there spent a few years. He has been 
very successful in a business way. 

Politically, Mr. Cessna is a Democrat, and fraternally he belongs to the 
Maccabees, and he and his wife are members of the Christian church. 

Mr. Cessna was married on February 17, 1874, to Sarah J. Norris, a 
native of Coshocton county, Ohio, and the daughter of William and Nancy 
Norris, old settlers there and a highly respected family, having located in that 
communitv in about 1820 or 1822. This union has been without issue. 



CHARLES RICHARD TULLOSS. 

The struggles of the worthy pioneer will remain untold unless some 
one interests himself in preserving it; this last should be the mission of we 
of the aftermath. We do not hear the howl of the wolf save in remote 
places ; we will not have an opportunity to again see th? "prairie schooner" — 
its mission has been well and nol:)ly filled. The many great changes have 
taken place slowly, and we realize their importance at this time. Do we fully 
appreciate the Titanic struggle of the pioneer, realizing the many privations 
he endured that we of today might l>e blessed? The mission of biography 
should be to bring to the living the voices of the silent ones who would be re- 
membered. We seek no bombast for the living, but we do speak in a force- 
ful manner for those who made it possible for us to enjoy these many present 
blessings. Charles Richard Tulloss, one of the farmers of Morgan township. 
Knox county, is a descendant of our sterling pioneers and he has endeavored 
to uphold the honor of the family name, which has been a familiar sound in 
this section of the Buckeye state for tnore than a century, his progenitor hav- 
ing braved the wilderness here when it was still the domain of the painted 
savage and the wild creatures of claw, fin anri feather, and here inaugurated 
the development of the locality which his descendants have carried forward. 

Mr. Tulloss was bom on September 9, 1853, on the old Tulloss home- 
stead where he has always lived. He is the son of William and Cynthia 
(Smith) Tulloss. Grandfather John J. Tulloss, lx)rn September 6, 1783. 
came from Fauquier county, Virginia, in 1807 and settled in Licking county, 
Ohio, near Newark. He made the first brick in the village, was school teacher 
and farmer; was a captain in the war of 1812; returned to Virginia and mar- 
ried Elizabeth Kaney ; came back, settled in Morgan township, Knox county. 



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492 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

in 1815; died in 1841; his wife died in 1869. He here became a large land 
owner, possessing at one time six hundred and forty acres of fine land, lying 
in the Licking and Sycamore valleys, two miles northwest of where the city 
of Utica now stands. He was prominent among the pioneers of this 
section of the state and an influential man of affairs, strong-minded, cour- 
ageous and honorable. His family consisted of eight children, namely: Ann, 
wife of Benjamin Seymour, both deceased; Elizabeth married Charles Uzziel 
Stephens, both now deceased; William, father of the subject of this sketch; 
Richard Shute, a sincere man and influential citizen who is now deceased, is 
mentioned in a later paragraph ; John J. married Caroline Smith and is now 
deceased; Benjamin, who married Margaret Campbell, is a Baptist minister 
of Mt. Vernon ; Susan remained single ; Rodham married Elizabeth Harris. 

William Tulloss, mentioned above, devoted his life to farming and 
stock raising and, like his father before him, became one of the substantial 
and influential men of his community. He was twice married. In 1856 he 
moved to Kansas, where he became a leader in public affairs and he served 
very creditably as probate judge of Franklin county, that state, for a num- 
ber of years. His death occurred there in November, 1866, his wife having 
died in 1863. They were the parents of five children, namely: John S., de- 
ceased ; James K. is deceased ; Levi is deceased ; William S. lives in Franklin 
county, Kansas; Charles Richard, of this review. 

William Tulloss, the father, was a Republican and was always active in 
public matters. He held various offices in his township. He was a member of 
the Baptist church. His second wife was Felicia Scott, daughter of Rev. 
James Scott and wife, he being a prominent Presbyterian minister for many 
years. To this union was born a son, Benjamin F. 

Charles R. Tulloss, of this sketch, went to Kansas with his parents. He 
was educated in the district schools of Morgan township, Knox county, Ohio, 
and in Franklin county, Kansas. Upon the death of his father he returned 
to Knox county and engaged in farming, which he has continued to the present 
time. He is a stock feeder. He is the owner of the old Tulloss 
homestead which he has kept, his part of the old farm consisting of three 
hundred acres. He employs modern methods in his farming and stock rais- 
ing. He has an attractive and commodious dwelling, and a library of choice 
and carefully selected volumes and here he spends much of his spare time, 
keeping in touch with the world's best literature as well as current topics 
of the day. He delights especially in Darwin, Spencer, Mills, Schopenhauer, 
Voltaire and similar works, in fact, he has practically all the "evolution series," 
as w^ell as those of Tolstoy, Henry George, the great single-tax advocate. But 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 493 

his library embraces all subjects. He is very interesting to converse with, 
being thus self-educated, for, in the language of Franklin, ''Reading maketh 
a wise man." Mr. Tulloss is a man of individuality, fearless in his opinions 
and a thinker. While he -is interested in public matters, he has never voted. 
He is liberal in his religious viewsj and has never joined any church, believing 
not in man-made creeds or set forms of worship. 

Richard Sheets Tulloss was bom June 13, 1 819. He was reared on the 
farm and after his father s death took charge of the farm. He was elected 
to the constitutional convention of Ohio in 1873 and served on the committee 
of privileges and election, on preamble and bill of rights and on agriculture. 
He filled a number of township offices. He was an influential citizen and 
highly esteemed for his social quality and straightforward business transac- 
tions. He remained single and died August 24, 1892. He was a son of John 
James and Elizabeth Tulloss, who are referred to in preceding paragraphs. 



JOHN F. SHRONTZ, M. D. 

Not only in Martinsburg, but throughout the surrounding country for 
a radius of many, miles. Dr. John F. Shrontz is known as a successful and 
skilled physician, one who has given years of thought and painstaking prep- 
aration to his profession and who is thoroughly qualified for its practice. Nla- 
ture endowed him with the qualities necessary for success as a general prac- 
titioner, for he is sympathetic, patient and thoughtful, and in the hour of 
extremity- is cool and courageous. Though his extensive practice has always 
engrossed most of his attention, he has found time to keep posted upon the 
practical details in the improvement in the science and avails himself of every 
development in remedial agencies. For a period of about thirty-five years 
he has ministered to the sick and suffering here and has always maintained 
an irreproachable character worthy of respect and emulation. 

Doctor Shrontz was bom on August 10, 1849, ^^ Washington county, 
Pennsylvania. He is the son of Jacob and Nancy (Cooper) Shrontz, who 
came to Knox county in 1864 and settled on a farm in Morgan township and 
there engaged in farming. Jacob Shrontz became one of the leading men of 
his community, prosperous and active in Republican politics, filling a number 
of the local offices, such as justice of the peace of Morgan township, also as 
a member of the board of education. He was a member of the Disciples 
church. His death occurred in April, 1900, his wife having preceded him 



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494 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

to the grave in October, 1895. Both are buried in Hill cemetery, near Bell 
church. They became the parents of five children, namely: Christie A. is 
deceased; John F., of this sketch; Emma J. married W. P. Harrison, of Cin- 
cinnati; Nancy died in infanc}-; W. B. lives in Martinsburg. 

John F. Shrontz was reared on the home farm and there assisted in the 
general work, attending the country district schools in the winter months, 
later attending the old Martinsburg Academy and a business college at Mt. 
Vernon, and before coming to Knox county he was a pupil in the Pleasant 
Valley Academy in Washington county, Pennsylvania. He began his career 
by teaching for two years in the schools of Knox county, then entered the 
Cincinnati Medical College, from which he was graduated with the class of 
1877. Thus well equipped for his chosen vocation he came to Martinsburg, 
Ohio, and opened an office and here he has since remained, with the excep- 
tion of the years 1894 and 1895, when he practiced in Newark, Ohio, but 
returned to Martinsburg. He has always enjoyed a ve^-v liberal patronage 
and has met with uniform success. He is a member of the Ohio State Medi- 
cal Society and the National Medical Association. 

Doctor Shrontz was married on July 13, 1876, to Nellie Leeding, daugh- 
ter of Robert and Amanda (Harris) Leeding, an excellent Licking county 
family, her father having served as county commissioner and as a member of 
the state board of equalization for several years. 

Three children have been born to the Doctor and wife, namely: Bessie 
M., now the wife of Gaylord Vance, of Columbus: Lena B., who married 
Homer C. Dodd, of Dayton, and William E., who married Pearl J. Rouse, 
daughter of William L. and Ida (Mercer) Rouse, the father a physician of 
Greene county, Ohio, for many years, but is now deceased. William E. 
Shrontz was educated in the Martinsburg schools and also spent two years in 
Hiram College, and four years at the Physio-Medical College of Indiana, at 
Indianapolis, from which he was graduated with the class of, 1906 and is now 
successfully engaged in the practice with his father, being regarded as a 
young man of much promise in the medical profession. 

Dr. John F. Shrontz was retained at the Cincinnati Medical College for 
several years after his graduation in various departments, and there he gave 
eminent satisfaction as a lecturer, being both an instructor and entertainer and 
thus popular with both the students and his fellow instructors. In addition 
to his profession, he has been successfully interested in various business en- 
terprises, especially in promoting an electric line for Martinsburg, the Ohio, 
Lake Erie & Eastern, having Martinsburg as an objective point. He is a 
public-spirited citizen and always alert to the best interests of his community. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 495 

He has large farming interests and gives considerable attention to his valu- 
able real estate holdings. 

Fraternally, the Doctor is a member of the Masonic order, Ohio Lodge, 
No. 199, at Bladensburg. He is a Republican and has long been active in 
party affairs. For a number of years he served as a member of the Republi- 
can county central committee, and is now succeeded by his son. He has been 
a frequent delegate to county, district and state conventions. He has served 
as a member of the village council for many years, and he was active in se- 
curing telephone service for Martinsburg, and also inany village improve- 
ments, such as sidewalks and street lights. He believes in progress, in keep- 
ing up with modern twentieth-century methods, not only in his profession, 
but in all lines. He and his family are members of the Disciples church and 
he is active in church and Sunday school work. 

The Shrontz residence in Martinsburg is one of the most attractive and 
substantial in this part of the county and it is known to the many friends of 
the family as a place of old-time hospitality and good cheer, the family hav- 
ing always been prominent in the social life of the community. 



WILL H. JACKSON. 

One of the successful farmers of Milford township, Knox county, and 
one of the worthy native sons of the locality of which this history treats, 
is Will H. Jackson, a representative of a highly-respected family which has 
been known here for many decades. 

Mr. Jackson was born in the west side of Milford township, this county, 
on October 24, 1861. He is the son of Van Buren and Orlena (Jackson) Jack- 
son. The paternal grandparents were George and Mary (Hobbs) Jackson, he 
a native of Washington county, Pennsylvania, born in 1782, died June 6, 1848, 
and she bom at Aliquot Mills, nine miles from Baltimore, March 17, 1793, and 
died August 5, 1877. They were married in Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and in 1835 came to Knox county, Ohio, and located in Milford town- 
ship, where he bought a farm and here they spent the rest of their lives, 
having become very well established. The elder Jackson was the father of 
nineteen children, fourteen by his first wife and five by his second. 

The maternal grandparents, Ephraim and Nancy Ellen (Cook) Jack- 
son, natives of Fayette county, Pennsylvania, he of Uniontown, and she of 
Big Red Stone, Tippecanoe township. Ephraim Jackson came to Ohio 
about 1820 with his father, Abraham, who entered land here in 1825. Abra- 



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496 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

ham Jackson was the son of an Irish nobleman and he emigrated to America 
during the Revolutionary war. A year after coming here Ephraim Jacksc«i 
returned to Pennsylvania and there married. He returned to Ohio with his 
bride, making the trip on horseback, and built a cabin on his farm, the build- 
ing, at first, having neither window^ nor door, and there he and his wife spent 
the balance of their lives. He was bom February 16, 1805, and she on June 
5th of the same year; his death occurred on November 22, 1872, and she 
on January 17, 1870. 

The father. Van Buren Jackson, was bom in this township, March 17, 
1836, and the mother on the farm occupied by the subject on October 25, 
1833, ^"d here these parents grew up as pioneer children, he being the 
eighteenth child of his father and the fourth of his mother, and she the fifth 
child of her parents. Here they were married on October 28, 1858. Van 
Bfuren Jackson devoted his life to farming, operating the home place most 
successfully. He bought the interests of his wife's brothers and sisters and 
at one time owned two hundred and eighteen acres, but most of the place has 
been sold and divided. He lived a quiet and retired life, but took an interest 
in public affairs and led an exemplary life. He and his wife were members 
of the Disciples church. He is still living and has the respect of all who know 
him. The death of his wife occurred on October 13, 1898. They were the 
parents of three children, namely: Will H., of this sketch; Theo. A., and 
Lillian B., now the wife of W. C. Riley. The father was stricken with 
paralysis on March 3, 191 1, and has been very poorly ever since. 

Will H. Jackson grew up on the home farm and worked there during 
his boyhood days in the summer months. He received his education in the 
common schools and the Tri-State College at Angola, Indiana. He has been 
managing the hom« farm for some time and is very successful as a general 
farmer and stock raiser. Politically, he is a Democrat, and in his religious 
life belongs to the Disciples church. 



JOSEPH BEAL. 



One of our most enterprising young farmers is Joseph Beal, of Butler 
township, one of the worthy native sons of Knox county who has been con- 
tent to spend his life in his own community, well knowing that for him this 
is the best place of all. It is a question whether or not many young men who 
have left this nature-favored locality bettered their chances for success, with 
the doubt on the negative side. But notwithstanding the fact that he grew 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 497 

Up under favorable environments, he knew that he had to work and work 
diligently to win in life's battle even here, for we do not get our food in this 
country like the South Sea Islanders or the dwellers in the tropics, by merely 
partaking of nature's bounty with no exertion on our part, in case we are 
not inclined to put forth an effort to gain a living; so he has always worked 
hard and now finds himself very comfortably established, with bright hopes 
for the future. 

Mr. Beal was born in this county on July i, i860. He is the son of 
Michael and Margaret (Albright) Beal, a complete sketch of whom appears 
on another page of this work. He was one of a large family of children, 
and, his father being a fanner, there was plenty for the subject to do while 
growing to manhood, consequently he worked in the fields during the crop 
seasons and went to the district schools in the winter time, and took up farm- 
ing for a livelihood in early life, and for some time worked at home for his 
father, then rented a while. In 1884 he purchased a farm of eighty acres in 
Butler township, this county, and in 1889 added forty-seven acres to this. 
In 1896 he deeded this land away and in 1900 bought forty acres in Union 
township, and in 1910 forty acres more. He still lives on the farm of Mary 
M. Beal and carries on farming and stock raising. 

Politically, Mr. Beal is a Republican, and fraternally, he belongs to the 
Patrons of Industry, while religiously he is a member of the Baptist church. 

Mr. Beal was married on August 23, 1891, to Nettie F. Leatherman, 
daughter of Joseph L. Leatherman, who came to Licking county, Ohio, in 
i860. His death occurred on January 3, 1889. Six children have been born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Beal, namely: Russell B., who died when two years old, and 
Dale; four others died in infancy. 



JOHN M. MOTZ. 



Aside from his connections with the civic affairs of Knox county, John 
M. Motz, farmer and stock man of Brown township, has long been an in- 
fluential factor in the industrial interests of his community, his entire life 
having been spent here, everything calculated to advance the community, 
materially or otherwise, receiving his support and hearty co-operation. He 
is unswerving in his allegiance to what he believes to be right, and upholds 
his honest convictions at the sacrifice, if need be, of every other interest. 
Conscientious in the discharge of his duties of citizenship, he is a valued mem- 



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498 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

ber of the body politic, and his aim has ever been to shape his life according 
to the highest standards of excellence, therefore, he has won the esteem and 
good will of all who know him. 

Mr. Motz was born on March 27, 1858, on a farm in Brown township, 
this county, near Jelloway. He is the son of Gottlieb and Catherine (Will- 
iams) Motz, both natives of Germany, where they spent their childhood, 
and from that country they emigrated to America as young people, he at the 
age of eighteen and she when seven years old. The father made the trip 
alone, but the mother's parents came with her. All formerly lived in 
the province of Alsace. Gottlieb Motz was a cabinet-maker, and soon after 
he landed in this country he established himself at Wooster, Ohio, working 
at his trade for some time, then moved to Holmes county, later turning his 
attention to farming and while living in Holmes county he and Catherine 
Williams were married. She had also come from Alsace, Germany. After 
their marriage they lived in, Holmes county for a number of years, then 
came to Brown township, Knox county, buying a farm near Jelloway, 
which they developed, establishing there a comfortable home, Mr. Motz 
continuing to work some as a cabinet-maker. It was about 1850 that they 
settled in Kbox county. They were a sturdy, industrious, frugal German 
couple, and, being fortunately located, succeeded, acquiring considerable 
property and a competence, owning an excellent farm of two hundred acres 
and other property. Politically, the father was a Democrat, but he did not 
take much interest in public affairs, merely exercising the right of suffrage 
at the polls. He and his family were members of the Evangelical Lutheran 
church. The death of Gottlieb Motz occurred in October, 1900, his wife 
having died previously in June, 1892, the month following the celebration 
of her fiftieth wedding anniversary. They were the parents of seven chil- 
dren, namely: Elizabeth, who is now deceased, married John Artz; Mary, 
also deceased, married Michael Pichrert; Adam lives in Akron, Ohio; Cath- 
erine, who married George Richert; John M., of this sketch: Henry W. 
lives in Brown township: Sarah is the wife of Daniel Richart. 

John M. Motz was reared on the farm and worked in the fields when 
but a boy, attending the district schools in Brown township in the winter- 
time. He remained with his parents until his marriage, on October 16. 
1883, to Emma H. Buehl, daughter of Peter and Mary Ann (Simmons) 
Buehl, a prominent family of Wayne county, Ohio. To the subject and 
wife eleven children have been born, six daughters and five sons, namely: 
Oscar G. is married and lives in Akron; Ethel M. married Frank Heim- 
baugh, of Akron; Edna M. married C. C. Long, of Brown township: Gladys 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 499 

A. married C. C Pealer, of Pike township, Knox county ; Luella C, Martha 
A., Herman J., Reynold B., Caleb P., Helen G. and Cecil F. are all at home. 

Following his marriage, John M. Motz engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness at Jelloway for four years, enjoying a good trade with the surrounding 
country. He then came to the farm where he still resides, five miles south 
of Jelloway, and here he has met with encouraging success as a general 
farmer and stock raiser, his well improved and well tilled farm consisting 
of one hundred and thirty-five acres. He has a comfortable home and good 
barn and other outbuildings. 

Politically, Mr. Motz is a Democrat and has always been active in 
public matters. He has served as clerk of Brown township for a period of 
eight years, and for nine years he was a member of the school board of 
Amity Special, he being still a member of the same, and is clerk of the 
board. In the fall of 1905 he was elected a member of the board of county 
commissioners and served on the same for a period of five years. As a 
public official he has served the people with much ability and fidelity, dis- 
charging his every duty conscientiously and his record has been highly 
commendable to the masses. He is a member of Amity Grange, Patrons of 
Hus-bandry, and has long been active in the same. He and his family be- 
long to the Evangelical Lutheran church and have always been active in 
church and Sunday school work. This family is prominent in the social 
life of the county. 



MICHAEL BEAL. 



One of the well-remembered pioneer residents of Knox county, who 
has long since closed his eyes on earthly scenes in a sleep that wakes not to 
toil, was the late Michael Beal than whom it would have been hard to find a 
more whole-souled or trustworthy a man, and because of his many commend- 
able qualities, his industry, honesty and public spirit he was always revered by 
a host of warm friends and his memory will always be cherished by the many 
who knew^ him, and all speak in the highest terms of his exemplary and 
worthy life. 

Mr. Beal was born in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, March 9, 182 1. 
He was the son of John and Margaret Beal, natives of Pennsylvanfa, in 
which state they lived and died. 

Michael Beal was educated in the subscription schools of his time and 
w^as reared on the farm, where he found plenty of hard work to do, for it 



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500 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

had not long been reclaimed from the wilderness. Then, too, there were 
fourteen children in the family, and the father had died comparatively early 
in life, so the sons had to help raise the family and necessarily found plenty 
to do. 

Michael Beal was married in February, 1843, ^^^ ^^ March of that year 
he moved to Knox county and located where O. M. Underwood now lives 
in Butler township, and later he added to this place until he became very 
comfortably established and through hard work and rightly applied princi- 
ples ranked with the leading farmers of his vicinity, spending the remainder 
of his life here, dying on November 17, 1893. 

Politically, Mr. Beal was a Republican and he held a number of the lo- 
cal offices, always to the satisfaction of all concerned, though he preferred to 
lead a quiet home life and cared practically nothing for the emoluments of 
public office. 

Mr. Beal was married in February, 1843, ^^ stated in a preceding para- 
graph, to Margaret Albright, a native of Londonderry township, Bedford 
county, Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of Christian Albright. Thirteen 
children were born to Michael Beal and wife, two of whom died in infancy 
and two in childhood ; nine are still living, named as follows : Edward died 
when five years old; Charles married Mary Carpenter and she is now de- 
ceased ; Levi married Lucy Dunlap ; George died when eighteen months old ; 
Mary M. was next in order of birth; Martha Ellen married O. M. LPnder- 
wood, a farmer of this county; Lucy is the wife of Osborne Hunter; Chris- 
tian P. came next in order; Joseph, a farmer of Butler township, whose 
sketch appears on another page of this work; Sarah J. married Thomas 
Shupley; Michael, who married Qarissa B. Hunter, lives in California. 



GEORGE W. SPERRY. 

The biographies of enterprising men, especially of good men, are in- 
structive as guides and incentives to others. The examples they furnish of 
patient purpose and steadfast integrity strongly illustrate what is in the 
power of each to accomplish. Some men seem to belong to no exclusive 
class in life; apparently insurmountable obstacles awaken their dormant 
faculties and serve as a stimulus to carry them to ultimate renown. The 
instances of success in the face of adverse fate would seem almost to justify 
the conclusion that self-reliance, with a half chance, can accomplish any 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 5OI 

reasonable object. One of the well-to-do agriculturists and stock men of 
Morgan township, Knox county, who has had the courage to push onward 
in the face of obstacles is George W. Sperry, a worthy representative of one 
of our sterling old pioneer families. 

Mr. Sperry was born on June ii, 1846, on a farm in Morgan town- 
ship, near the town of Utica. He is the son of Peter W. and Jerusha (Wil- 
son) Sperry. The grandparents, Jacob and Mary Sperry, came with their 
family from Loudoun county, Virginia, in 181 7, and in that year Peter 
W. Sperry was bom. Both the subject's grandfather and father were large 
land owners and dealt extensively in lands and were prominent and in- 
fluential in this community. They were also large stock dealers and trad- 
ers. The father of the subject was engaged in the banking business in 
Utica for about twenty-five years. It was a private bank and was very 
popular in that community. It was known as the Sperry & Wilson bank. 
Mr. Sperry established the first bank in Utica, which remained the only 
bank there for fully twenty years and it became an important commercial 
institution. Mr. Sperry was one of the most progressive business men of 
his day in this part of the country and was a man of strong characteristics 
in every way. Politically, he was a Republican, and took a leading part in 
public affairs, but was never an office seeker, though he filled various local 
offices in Morgan township. He was a devout member and liberal supporter 
of the Baptist church. His death occurred on December 21, 1894. His 
widow survives, at the advanced age of eighty-eight years. They were the 
parents of six children, four sons and two daughters, namely: George W., 
of this review; Ella, now Mrs. Chesley Womstaff, of Ashley; Lina married 
Bennett Kelley, of Mt. Gilead; William W. lives in Morgan township; 
Oiarles F. lives at Ashley; Fred S. lives in Utica. 

George W. Sperry was reared on the farm and there he worked hard 
when a boy. He received his education in the district schools and at Denni- 
son University at Granville, Ohio. He was married on July 14, 1876, to 
Margery E. Smoots, daughter of Eli and Caroline (Moore) Smoots, of near 
Utica, Licking county. The father was a well known lawyer there and was 
active in settling many estates, some of much magnitude. 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Sperry, namely: 
Mabel, who married Ray K. Smith, is now deceased; Walter L. lives in 
Newark, Ohio; J. Arthur lives in Los Angeles, California. 

After his marriage Mr. Sperry settled on a farm belonging to his 
father in Morgan township, Knox county, Ohio, and a few years later he 
bought the farm where he has since resided, one-half mile north of Utica. 



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502 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

He has been very successful as a general farmer and stock raiser and he now 
has two farms, totalling nearly four hundred acres, all well improved and 
excellent land. In connection with general farming on a large scale he car- 
ries on stock raising and feeding and shipping. Although his farms are 
rented, he superintends them. He has also been interested in raising and 
breeding Shetland ponies, pure-bred stock. He has maintained a breeding 
farm for twenty years and no small portion of his income has been derived 
from this source. His ponies are considered the very finest of their kind 
and have been in great demand, they having been shipped all over the coun- 
try. He always keeps a large herd to select from. Mr. Sperry is a director 
in the Utica Savings Bank. He is also interested in various other business 
enterprises, and is a man of affairs, progressive in all that the term implies. 
Politically, Mr. Sperry is a Republican, and while he has always been 
an active supporter of his party and all movements looking to the general 
improvement of his community, he has never been an office seeker. He has 
served two terms as justice of the peace of Morgan township, but never on 
his own volition, though he made a most faithful and capable public servant. 
Fraternally, he is a Mason, having been a member of the order for thirty- 
five years, and a member of Clinton Chapter No. 26, Royal Arch Masons, 
and Clinton Commandery No. 5, Knights Templar, at Mt. Vernon. His 
wife and family belong to the Presbyterian church. This family has long 
been prominent in the social life of the community. 



REV. OTTO P. TROGUiS. 

The name of the Rev. Otto P. Trogus needs no formal introduction to 
the readers of this work, for his labors during the period of his residence 
in the locality embraced by this history have sened to render him botti fa- 
vorably and well known, and as pastor of St. Luke's church at Danville, he 
has done much toward ameliorating the condition of the people here. He is 
an earnest, persistent worker, often laboring with disregard for his own 
ease and welfare if, thereby, he may make some one happier or better, content 
merely to know that he is following in the footsteps of the Master. 

Rev. Father Trogus was born in Columbus, Ohio, and is the son of 
Joseph and Florentine Trogus, the oldest child of a family of nine children, 
three of whom died in infancy. He was baptized in Holy Cross church in 
his native city by the Rev. F. X. Specht, assistant pastor, who was then 
organizing the present St. Mary's parish. South Third street. It was in 



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St-Luke's Church Danville.O* 
1007 OttoP.TroKas, 

Pastor, 





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,/ 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 503 

this church he attended divine services and its parochial school in his boy- 
hood days. When twelve years of age he received his first holy commun- 
ion from the hands of the pastor, the Rev. F. X. Specht, V. G., and soon 
afterward was confirmed by the late Rev. John A. Watte rson, D. D. De- 
sirous of more learning he attended daily the cathedral night school, paying 
for the tuition from the means obtained by the labor of his hands during 
the day. This course was continued for several years. In the meantime 
he also assisted his parents, who still enjoy the blessings of earth in Ohio's 
capital city. 

With the call of the priesthood from his early boyhood ever growing 
stronger, he sought the counsel and help of his superiors and then entered 
St. Jerome's College, Berlin, Ontario, Canada, and having finished his 
classical course there, he was admitted to and completed his theological 
studies at St. Mary's Seminary of the West, Cincinnati, where, on the 17th 
day of June, 1897, he was ordained by the late Most Rev. Archbishop 
William Elder, D. D., in the chapel of St. John the Baptist, in said seminary. 

The subject said his first holy mass June 17, 1897, at Holy Cross 
church, Columbus, and sooq afterwards attended to the office of chaplain of 
the Good Shepherd convent in Cincinnati, and after four months' service 
there, he was appointed assistant pastor of St. Francis de Sales church, 
Newark, Ohio. 

During the absence of the pastor of St. Francis Xavier's church, Mal- 
vern, Ohio, he was sent to assume temporary charge of this parish. He 
was then appointed pastor of St. Mary's church, Merges, Carroll county 
(Waynesburg postoflice), by the Rt. Rev. Henry Moeller, D. D., February 
10, 1902, holding charge up to July 23, 1905, when he was transferred to 
his present pastorial charge, St. Luke's church, Danville, Ohio, by the present 
bishop of the Columbus diocese, the Rt. Rev. James J. Hartley, D. D. 

On the 17th day of June, 1907, amidst the cheer and joy of the par- 
ishioners. Rev. Father Trogus celebrated the tenth anniversary of his 
ordination to the priesthood, as a token of gratitude and praise to the Divine 
Majesty in acknowledgment of the numberless blessings received and at the 
same time invoking the Divine Master of the vineyard for His ceaseless 
assistance and blessing of his labors therein, ever mindful of the responsi- 
bility and cross of his sacerdotal office, yet, cheerfully faithful to his priestly 
duties. Since coming here he has greatly strengthened the church and has 
won the esteem of all who have come into contact with him, irrespective of 
creed. The present number of members in St. Luke's parish, adults and 
children, is five hundred and twenty-five. 

(33) 



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504 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

OSMER JAMBS HARRIS. 

In this country it is easy for a strong young man to go out and make a 
good living for himself, that is, it is easy if he is willing to apply himself 
persistently to whatever he attempts, but this is not a land like the islands 
in the south Pacific ocean where one can live by practically no exertion, by 
merely partaking of nature's great storehouse, cocoanuts, bread fruit, ba- 
nanas and many another esculent largess of the lavish Cornucopia. Such a 
country has never produced one single great leader of men in any avenue. 
They live along the line of least resistance, putting forth no effort to do 
anything worth while for either themselves or their fellows. The lands 
that produce great and strong men are those where a living must be wrested 
from a resisting nature, where one must work or starve and freeze. 

One of the citizens of Knox county who has depended solely upon his 
own exertions for what he has is Osmer James Harris, farmer of Jackson 
township. He was born in this county on September 10, 1866, and here 
he has spent his life. He is the son of Robert and Mary (Melick) Harris. 
The paternal grandparents, Samuel and Sarah^Harris, were old settlers of 
Knox county, and the maternal grandparents, Greenberry Melick and wife, 
were also pioneers of this country, which they all helped develop. Both 
parents of the subject were born in Knox county, reared here, and here 
they were married and became the owners of a good farm. In politics the 
father was a Democrat, and they were both members of the Disciples church. 
They were the parents of six children, four of whom are living at this 
writing. The father's death occurred on November 20, 1907, but the 
mother is still living. 

Osmer J. Harris grew to manhood on his parents' farm and he re- 
ceived his education in the public schools of Bladensburg. When a young 
man he took up farming for a livelihood and this has been his life work. 
He worked by the month until he was married, then rented land for some 
time in order to get a start. In 1893 he bought a farm of eighty-three 
acres in Jackson township, Knox county, and here he has since remained 
successfully engaged in general farming, having added many valuable im- 
provements to his place, and he always keeps sufficient live stock of various 
kinds to feed his crops to. 

Politically, Mr. Harris is a Democrat, but he has never been an office- 
seeker. He and his wife belong to the Disciples church. 

Mr. Harris was married on December 24, 1889, to Ella Horn, daughter 
of Martin and Elizabeth Horn, natives of Knox county, where they grew 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 505 

Up and were married and here they spent their lives, the mother's death oc- 
curring on March lo, 1883, the father surviving until October 9, 1910, 
reaching an advanced age. He was the son of Joseph and Susan Horn, 
who came to this county from Pennsylvania about 18 10, and here by hard 
work hewed out a home from the forest. The Horn family has been well 
known here for over a century. Ten children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Martin Horn, all of whom are living. The maternal grandparents of Mrs. 
Harris, George and Mary Adrian, were natives of Pennsylvania and were 
also very early settlers in Knox county. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Harris 
has been without issue. 



CHARLES B. JACKSON. 

In nearly every community are individuals who by innate ability and 
sheer force of character rise above discouraging environments to honored 
places in public esteem. Such a case is that of Charles B. Jackson, well 
known farmer and stock raiser of Milford township, a man who has been 
identified with the history of Knox county all his life, during which he has 
striven to do his part in the material affairs of the locality, while his career 
as a progressive man of affairs has been synonymous with all that is upright 
and honorable in citizenship. He is a scion of one of the sterling pioneer 
families of this section of the Buckeye state, and many of their praiseworthy 
attributes seem to have outcropped in him. 

Mr. Jackson was lx>m in Milford township, this county, near where he 
still resides, on November 14, 1853 He is the son of George and Sarah 
(Riley) Jackson. The paternal grandparents, Abram and Sarah Jackson, 
natives of Fayette county, Pennsylvania, came to Knox county, Ohio, in 
1820 and located in Milford township, when the country was being re- 
deemed from the primeval wilderness and neighbors were few ; here they 
bought a farm, established a good home and reared their family of three 
children, of whom George, father of the subject, was the youngest. He was 
a Hacksmith by trade and a great trapper. He followed his trade until 
quite old. He and his wife both died here. 

The maternal grandparents, William and Lucy (Arnold) Riley, were 
natives of Virgiia, she descended from a very early Kentucky family. He 
was a shoemaker by trade. 

George Jackson, father of the subject, was born in Fayette county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1807, and his wife, Sarah Riley, was born in Maryland 



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506 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

on October 22, 1820. They each came here when young with their parents 
and grew to maturity, she marrying first a Mr. Cramer, who died young, 
then married George Jackson. The latter devoted his life to farming and 
became the owner of about two hundred acres of excellent land. He was an 
influential man in his community. At one time he served as county com- 
missioner, being on the building committee during the period that the court 
house was constructed. Politically, he was a Democrat, and he and his wife 
were members of the Baptist church. 

To Mr. and Mrs. George Jackson were born six sons and two daugh- 
ters, five of whom are living. By her first marriage one son was bom. 

George Jackson was captain of a company of militia in Milford town- 
ship about 1838 or 1840. He was a hard working farmer and led a quiet 
life. His death occurred in September, 1890, his wife having preceded him 
to the narrow house in October, 1886. 

Charles B. Jackson received his education in the old brick school house, 
in his home district schools, and he was reared on the farm, where he 
worked hard when a boy. Early in life he took up farming for a livelihood, 
working on the home place. In May, 1876, he purchased one hundred and 
one acres in Milford township, on which he erected a splendid set of build- 
ings and made up-to-date improvements in every way and here he still re- 
sides, having been very successful as a general farmer and stock raiser, de- 
voting especial attention to raising sheep. 

Politically, Mr. Jackson is a loyal Democrat and has long been a poten- 
tial factor in local affairs. He has served his township as clerk and assessor, 
and has been treasurer for the past two years, also township constable. As a 
public servant he performs his duties most ably and conscientiously, to the 
satisfaction of all concerned. 

Since 1908 Mr. Jackson has been president of the Knox County Agri- 
cultural Association, and he has done much to make the same a success. He 
keeps well informed on agricultural topics and advocates up-to-date methods 
in general farming. He has always been active in bettering the condition 
of the farmers. He and his wife belong to the Grange, and he has held all 
the offices in the same. He also belongs to the Knights of Pythias, having 
passed all the chairs in the local lodge, and represented it at Cleveland and 
Cincinnati at state conventions. 

Charles B. Jackson was married on March 23, 1876, to Melvina Ross, 
a native of Milford township and the daughter of Timothy and Esther Ann 
Ross, each representing pioneer families of this locality, in which they were 
both born. Grandfather Ross was from Pennsylvania. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 507 

One son, Carroll, has been born to Charles B. Jackson and wife. He 
received a good education and is now a druggist at Gambier. He married 
Catherine Graham, daughter of N|. Graham, and they have one son, Charles 
Graham Jackson, now four years old. Carroll Jackson served in Company 
L, Fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, during the Spanish- American war, being 
first corporal. He saw active service in Porto Rico. He was educated in 
the Mt. Vernon high school and in Ohio Northern University at Ada, from 
which he was graduated in pharmacy, also took a post-graduate course in 
the Ohio Pharmaceutical Institute. 



W. L. BOTTENFIELD. 

The name of W. L. Bottenfield needs no introduction to the people of 
Knox county, for here he has been actively engaged in agricultural affairs 
for many years and has taken an active part in public matters, and, being a 
genial, obliging gentleman, he has ever been held in high regard by those 
with whom he has come into contact. 

Mr. Bottenfield was born in Greene county, Pennsylvania, May 2, 1839, 
the son of John and Mary (Woodruff) Bottenfield. The paternal grand- 
parents, John and Barbara (Hammond) Bottenfield, were natives of Vir- 
ginia, his death having occurred on February 21, 1805. Both his parents 
and those of his w^ife came to this country from Germany in colonial days, 
and settled in the Old Dominion, the elder Bottenfield spending his life 
there, probably on a plantation, but his wnfe came to Ohio when this country 
was a wilderness and here her death occurred in August, 1850, at the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-three years, three months and eleven days. She and 
her husband were Dunkards. 

The subject's maternal grandfather w^as a native of New York, but of 
English descent, and when a young man he went to New Jersey, where he 
married, and later moved to Pennsylvania, where he engaged in farming and 
reared his family. In connection with farming he followed the trade of 
cabinet-maker. He and his wife both died in Greene county, Pennsylvania. 

The father of the subject was bom on April 27, 1788, in Virginia and 
his wife was bom on April 17, 1794, in the state of New Jersey. Elarly in 
life they both moved to Pennsylvania and there were married, in Greene 
county. John Bottenfield was a cooper by trade, also engaged in farming. 
and in 1839, shortly after the birth of the subject, he moved to Milford 



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508 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

township, Knox county, and bought a farm of two hundred acres there. All 
was a vast stretch of woods and Mr. Bottenfield was compelled even to cut 
a road to his land. He began life here in true pioneer fashion, clearing and 
improving his land and developing an excellent farm and here he reared his 
family of ten children, who were of great assistance to him in establishing 
the family home, for there was plenty of work for all. W. L., of this sketch, 
is the only member of this large family now surviving. Politically, John 
Bottenfield was a Democrat and was active and influential in the public 
affairs of his day, and he served in most of the township offices. He and 
his wife were members of the Baptist church. Being crippled, he was exempt 
from military service during the Civil war. These parents spent the rest of 
their lives in Milford township, the death of the father occurring in 1867 
and that of the mother in 1870. 

W. L. Bottenfield, of this sketch, was reared on the home farm, where 
he made himself useful during the crop seasons when he became of proper 
age, and he received his education in the common schools of his home dis- 
trict; however, his early schooling was interrupted and he was compelled 
to leave the school room when twelve years of age and work steadily on the 
farm, having cleared a great deal of land, made rails, and performed many 
of the hard tasks that fell to the lot of every pioneer child. Later he man- 
aged the home place, and, being the youngest of the family, took care of 
his parents in their old age. Upon the death of his father, in 1867, he pur- 
chased one hundred acres of the home place, which he retained until 1871, 
when he sold out. Farming has been his chief life work, and he is now the 
owner of one hundred and fifty acres of fertile, well improved and well 
cultivated land in Milford township, upon which are an up-to-date set of 
buildings. He also owns valuable real estate in Newark, Ohio. He has 
lived on his present place since 1872. He has accumulated a competency 
through his able management of his general farming and live stock inter- 
ests and in 1906 he retired from active life, and his son now^ operates the 
farm. During the past five years the subject has traveled most of the time, 
visiting many places of interest, traveling merely for pleasure, being away 
from horne practically ever since the death of his wife in 1906; however, 
two years of this time was spent as a salesman. 

Politically, Mr. Bottenfield is a Democrat, and he has held several of 
the township offices, always ably and satisfactorily. In 1893 he made the 
race for county commissioner, but the whole Democratic ticket was de- 
feated in the McKlnley landslide. Mrs. Bottenfield was a member of the 
Disciples church. 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 509 

The subject was married in 1871 to Clamana L. Stevens, who was 
born, reared and educated in Knox county. She was the daughter of 
John and Emeline Stevens, old settlers and a highly respected family here. 
Mrs. Bottenfield was a lady of many estimable characteristics and a favorite 
'with a wide circle of friends. She was called to her rest in 1906. One child 
was born to this union, Lee M., who married Jessie M. Clark, and is now 
farming on the homestead, as before stated. 



EDMUND COAN HOWELL. 

One of the leading farmers and stock men of Jackson township, Knox 
county, is Edmund Coan Howell, who has proven himself to be a man of 
sound judgment and pronounced views. While keeping himself well in- 
formed on current events and taking a lively interest in all public af- 
fairs of his township and county, yet he has never manifested a desire to 
exchange the quiet and contented life of a rural gentleman for the cares and 
vicissitudes which usually come to the man who fills official stations. 

Mr. Howell was born in Washington township, Coshocton county, 
Ohio, October 29, 1845. He is the son of Hezekiah and Sarah Ann 
(Chapin) Howell. The paternal grandparents were William and Rachael 
Howell, natives of Virginia, who came to Coshocton county in an early day 
and there reared their family and spent the l>alance of their lives. The 
paternal grandparents, James and Susan (Seward) Chapin, were also early 
settlers of Coshocton county and there they died. 

Hezekiah Howell, father of the subject, was born in 1822 and his 
death occurred on August 20, 1880. He came to Ohio as a child, and here 
he grew up and married; his wife, Sarah Ann Chapin, was born in this 
county and reared here. Shortly after their marriage they moved to Cosh- 
octon county and bought a farm of one hundred and twenty acres in Jack- 
son township, which Mr. Howell improved, cleared and repaired the build- 
ings, and added to until he became the owner of four hundred and sixty 
acres of valuable land and here he carried on general farming and stock 
raising on an extensive scale, becoming one of the substantial and influential 
men of his community. Politically, he was a Democrat. His family con- 
sisted of nine children, five of whom are now living. The death of the 
mother occurred on January 17, 1883, at the age of sixty-two years to the 
day. 



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5IO KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

Edmund C. Howell was reared on the home farm and there assisted 
with the general work. He received his education in the public schools of 
Knox county, whither he had come with his parents when a boy. With the 
exception of twelve and one-half years he has spent the rest of his life here. 
When a young man he worked by the month, then married and farmed a 
part of his father's land in Coshocton county. Upon the death of the ifather, 
the subject purchased one hundred and twenty acres in Coshocton county. 
When his mother died he bought the home place of one hundred and twenty 
acres in Jackson township, Knox county, a part of which lay in Licking 
county. Here he has since resided, having brought the land up to a high 
state of improvement and cultivation and put on new buildings, a com- 
modious residence and such other improvements as necessary. He has also 
added seventy-four acres to his place in Coshocton county. He has carried 
on general farming and stock raising, and has become widely known as a 
breeder of high grade cattle, sheep and good horses. 

Politically, Mr. Howell is a Democrat, though he is not a biased 
partisan and often votes independently. He has been township trustee for 
six years in Coshocton county and nine years as supervisor, and he has filled 
about all the township offices in Jackson; as a public serv^ant he has been 
most faithful in the discharge of his duty. In religious matters he belongs 
to the Baptist church, while his wife holds membership in the Presbyterian 
church. 

Mr. Howell was married on January i8, 1873, to Margaret E. Horn, 
a native of Knox county and the daughter of Elliott and Susan (McCom- 
ment) Horn, old settlers here and an excellent family. Seven children were 
born to this union, namely: George A. is floor walker in a department 
store in Cleveland; he was graduated from Granville College in 1907; 
Frank O., a graduate of Oberlin Business College, live3 in Columbus, where 
he is secretary-treasurer of the Ohio Grocery Association; Walter F., a 
graduate of Carlisle high school, is teaching in Louisville, Licking county, 
Ohio; Charles W., who was graduated in 1911 from Grinnell College, is 
engaged in government survey work at Paulding, Ohio; Ray is a student at 
Oberlin and will graduate from the Granville Academy; Ross, who spent 
two years at Granville, is still a student ; Grace is teaching school at Vanatta. 
Licking county. All these children have taught school four years, except 
Grace, who is teaching her first term, and Walter F., who has taught ten 
years, all most satisfactorily. 

Mr. Howell's first wife passed away on March 16, 1904, and on August 
15, 1907, he was married to Mrs. Emma B. Edmiston, nee Blue, the daughter 
of a well known local familv. This union has been without issue. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 5II 

SIMON B. FISH. 

Longfellow said, 'The talent of success is nothing more than doing 
what you can do well and doing well whatever you do, without any thought 
of fame." Illustrative of this sentiment has been the life of Simon B. Fish, 
farmer of Butler township, Knox county, for he ha^ tended strictly to his 
own affairs, pushed forward when the way was beset by obstacles and has 
succeeded in establishing a comfortable home. By his amiable disposition 
and genuine worth he has gained for himself a warm place in the hearts of 
his many friends in the eastern part of the county where he has long main- 
tained his residence. 

Mr. Fish was born in Muskingum county, Ohio, October 28, 1863. He 
is the son of Frederick and Keziah (Crawford) Fish. His paternal grand- 
parents, Frederick and Margaret Fish, were natives of Pennsylvania and 
they came to Ohio very early, settling in Coshocton county, entering land 
there which they improved and on which they spent the remainder of their 
lives. The maternal grandparents, Thomas and Mary Crawford, came from 
Maryland to Coshocton county, Ohio, in early times and there they spent the 
balance of their lives. 

The parents of the subject were both born in Coshocton county, there 
grew to maturity, received their education in the common schools and there 
were married. From there they moved to Muskingum county, but in 1865 
or the year following they established their home in Knox county, Mr. Fish 
becoming the owner of a good farm of one hundred and eight acres. Politi- 
cally, he was a -Democrat, and he and his wife belonged to the Disciples 
church. Their family consisted of nine children, three of whom are de- 
ceased, six still living. 

Simon B. Fish grew up on the home farm and was educated in the 
public schools of Jackson township. He worked by the month at farming 
for a year, then rented land a year, after which he bought twenty acres in 
Butler township and to this he has added forty acres, now having an ex- 
cellent and w^ell kept farm of sixty acres, on which he has built a cozy and 
substantial dwelling, good barn and other outbuildings, and here he has 
carried on general farming and stock raising successfully. 

Politically, Mr. Fish is an independent voter, and he belongs to the 
Patrons of Industry. 

On October 8, 1881, Mr. Fish was united in marriage with Angie 
Woods, daughter of John Woods and wife, old settlers in this county. One 
daughter w^as born to this union, Retta, now the wife of Otis Olerg. 



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512 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Mr. Fish's first wife died and on March 8, 1897, he was united in mar- 
riage with Amanda B. Vincent, daughter of Alexander M. and Mary Jane 
(Buchanan) Vincent, both natives of Pennsylvania, where they grew up 
and were married, and shortly afterwards they came to Ohio, in 1854, 
locating in Knox county; here Mr. Vincent engaged in the live stock busi- 
ness, buying and shipping, later turning his attention to farming. His death 
occurred in 1902, his wife having died in 1894. They were the parents of 
six children, four of whom are living, namely: Elizabeth, Amanda B., Jud- 
son and Mark. 



FRANCIS WYLIE CAMPBELL. 

It is generally considered by those in the habit of superficial thinking 
that the history of so-called great men only is worthy of preservation and 
that little merit exists among the masses to call forth the praises of the his- 
torian or the cheers and the appreciation of mankind. A greater mistake 
was never made. No man is great in all things and very few are great in 
many things. Some, by a lucky stroke, achieve lasting fame, who before 
that had no reputation beyond the limits of their neighborhoods. It is not 
a history of the lucky stroke which benefits humanity most, but the long 
study and effort which made the lucky stroke possible. It is the preliminary 
work, the method, that serves as a guide for the success of others. Among 
the farmers of Morgan township who have achieved success along steady 
lines of action is Francis W. Campbell. 

Mr. Campbell was born on January 15, 1861, in Washington township. 
Licking county, Ohio, and is the son of William and Sarah (Fishbaugh) 
Campbell. The Campbells came from Greene county, Pennsylvania, in 1810, 
and were therefore among the early pioneers of this locality. Grandfather 
John Campbell having come with his family and entered land from the gov- 
ernment, the farm still being in possession of the family. This countrj' 
was a wilderness at that time, the home of Indians and all kinds of wild 
kindreds of fur and feather. Hardships were many and luxuries few, but 
he was a man of strong characteristics, courage and fortitude and he suc- 
ceeded in establishing a good home, first erecting a log cabin and making a 
little clearing. The family celebrated the centennial anniversary of their 
coming to Ohio in 19 10. The father of the subject died in May, 1910, 
his wife having preceded him to the grave on October i, 1905. These par- 
ents never lived in Knox county. 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 5 13 

Five children were bom to Mr. and Mrs. William Campbell, namely: 
Robert J., living on the home farm in Licking county; Ensley S., of Miller 
township, Knox county; Francis W., of this sketch; Laura B. married A. H. 
Robrahn, of Sandusky, Ohio;, William S. Campbell, who lives on the home 
farm in Licking county, Ohio. 

Francis W. Campbell was reared on the home farm, where he worked 
when a boy. He received his education in the public schools of Utica, and 
he remained on the home farm until his marriage, on June 7, 1893, ^ 
Thedocia E. Tulloss, who was born in 1867, the daughter of Rodham and 
Elizabeth (Harris) Tulloss, a prominent Knox county family, a sketch of 
whom appears elsewhere in this volume. The subject and wife have one 
daughter, Edith L., born June 2, 1901, now a student in the public schools. 

The subject and wife first began housekeeping on the John Campbell 
homestead in Miller township,^ Knox county, later moving to their present 
farm, two miles northwest of Utica in Morgan township. This is one of 
the finest farms in this locality, and it comprises over three hundred acres, 
is well improved and under a high state of cultivation, and here Mr. Camp- 
bell carries on general farming and stock raising in a most successful man- 
ner, and he feeds all kinds of live stock, making a specialty of cattle. He 
has rotated his crops, applied fertilizer and "clovered" his land until it has 
more than retained its original fertility. He and his family are members 
of the Covenanter church and he is an elder in the same and has always 
been active in church and Sunday school work. He has a fine home, in 
fact, one of the most attractive country homes in the county, and it is known 
to the many friends of the family as a place of hospitality and good cheer, 
the family being prominent in all circles in which they choose to move. 



GEORGE S. HAMILTON. 

Among those who have met with a large measure of success in the 
active duties of life in Knox county is George S. Hamilton, owner of an 
excellent farmstead in the vicinity of Mt. Vernon. He comes of a splendid 
family, who have always been strong advocates of ri*ght living and indus- 
trious habits, for education and morality, and for all that contributes to the 
welfare of the commonwealth. Throughout his career Mr. Hamilton has 
pursued the even tenor of his way in the quiet and unostentatious manner 
which never courts publicity, attending strictly to his own affairs, doing the 



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514 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

right as he sees and understands the right and keeping his conscience void 
of offense toward his Creator and his fellow men. 

Mr. Hamilton was born on February 16, i860, on a farm five miles 
north of Utica, where he has always lived. He is the son of William and 
Elizabeth (Sellers) Hamilton, the father a native of Harrison county, Ohio, 
born on November 26, 1822. The mother was bom in Greene county, Pennsyl- 
vanict, July 15, 1817. William Hamilton came to Knox county in 1846 with 
his brother John and they settled on the Martinsburg road in Morgan town- 
ship, where he bought one hundred and eighty acres, later buying a farm 
where the subject now lives. He became a large land owner and prosperous 
farmer, and was influential in the affairs of his community. John Sellers, 
the maternal grandfather, came with his family from Greene county, Penn- 
sylvania, about 1820 and settled on land in Morgan township, when the 
country was new and sparsely settled, establishing his home near Owl creek, 
where he spent the remainder of his life, and here William Hamilton and 
Elizabeth Sellers were married. They became the parents of five children, 
namely: John, born October 24, 1848, died April 2, 1853; Craig, bom 
January 5, 1851, and died April 4, 1851 ; William M., bom February 15, 
1854, lives in Kansas; Edwin F., bom August 8, 1856, lives in Mt. Vernon; 
George S., of this review. The death of the father occurred on May 17, 
1908, and the mother on April 18, 1910. Both are buried in Owl Creek 
cemetery, near the old family homestead. The father was a Republican 
and for many years was active in public affairs and filled various township 
offices, and he was land appraiser for some time; he was frequently urged 
to accept county offices, but always declined. He was a man of affairs, with 
advanced ideas, and was highly regarded by all. He and his wife were 
members of the Owl Creek Baptist church and were devout church people. 

George S. Hamilton was reared on the home farm, where he assisted 
with the general work during the crop seasons as soon as he reached the 
proper age, and during the winter months he attended the common schools 
of his home community. He later entered Ohio Wesleyan University at 
Delaware, Ohio, where he made a good record. Returning home, he worked 
on the farm until his marriage, on February 15, 1900, to Alice M. McMa- 
han, daughter of Joseph and Eliza (Jolly) McMahan, of Pleasant township, 
Knox county. This union has resulted in the birth of three children, namely : 
Ruth, born January 5, 1902; Georgia Louise and Martha Leone, twins, 
born February 16, 1904. 

Since his marriage Mr. Hamilton has lived on the farm where he now 
resides, and he has been very successful as a general farmer and stock 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 5I5 

raiser and feeding live stock of various grades. He has kept the place under 
a high state of improvement and cultivation. For a number of years prior 
to and after his marriage he was extensively engaged in stock shipping. His 
fine farm comprises three hundred and eleven acres of as fertile land as the 
county affords, and he is regarded as a progressive and scientific farmer. 
He has a commodious home and substantial outbuildings and such improved 
types of farming machinery as his needs require. Mr. Hamilton has been 
very successful in a financial way and besides his farm he is largely inter- 
ested in a number of business enterprises. 

Politically, Mr. Hamilton is a Republican, and while he is a strong 
partisan he has not been an office seeker or holder; however, he has been 
urged frequently to be a candidate for county offices, but has always de- 
clined, preferrin^^ to attend strictly to his individual affairs, leaving the 
emoluments of public offices to others, though his support in all local move- 
ments looking to the general good of the community may always be de- 
pended upon. 



GEORGE A. HARRIS. 

One of the self-made men of southeastern Knox county is George A. 
Harris, of Jackson township, farmer, contractor and carpenter, a man who 
began life's struggles with little aid except such as his good strong arms, 
backed by a well defined purpose, afforded him, and he has never depended 
upon his friends and acquaintances to do his work or lay his plans, well 
knowing that life is a battle which each must fight out for the most part 
alone and learn to rely solely upon himself. 

Mr. Harris was bom in Jackson township, this county, January 21, 
1852. He is the son of Jesse and Elizabeth (Holtz) Harris. His paternal 
grandfather, Elijah Harris, was one of the early settlers of Kmox county 
and here became very comfortably established through his industry and 
close application. The maternal grandparents, George and Susan Holtz, 
were also early settlers here, entering land from the government which they 
developed into a good farm on which they spent the remaining years of their 
lives. 

The father of the subject w^as born in this county on September i, 1830, 
and the mother on November 4, 1827. They devoted their lives to farming, 
owning a good place. The father died January 28, 1908, and the mother on 
December 30, 1903. 



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5l6 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

George A. Harris was educated in the public schools of Newcastle 
and in Indiana common schools. He was reared on the fanti and has al- 
ways followed farming. Early in his career he moved to a forty-acre farm 
which he bought in Jackson township, on which there were already good 
buildings and here he has carried on general farming and stock raising and 
he now has a good home. In connection with farming he has also engaged 
in the building trades, working as a stone mason for a period of thirty-eight 
years and for the past five years he has worked at carpentering, but he has 
lived on his farm all the while. He is now the owner of one hundred and 
twenty acres of excellent land which he has kept well improved and under 
good cultivation. He has been very successful in a business way, always a 
hard worker and is regarded as very skilled as a builder, his services being 
in great demand. 

Politically, Mr. Harris is a Democrat and he has been more or less ac- 
tive in public affairs, always supporting such movements as make for the 
general upbuilding of the community and county. He has been justice of 
the peace for six years, the duties of which office he has discharged in an 
able and praiseworthy manner.* He is a member of the Disciples church, 
as is also his wife, and fraternally Mr. Harris belongs to. the Patrons of 
Industry. 

On May 22, 1877, Mr. Harris was united in marriage at Mt. Vernon, 
OIiJo, to Susanna Ashcraft, a native of Knox county, and the daughter of 
Simon Ashcraft and wife, old settlers of this county, both now deceased. 
To the subject and wife six children have been born, named as follows: 
Orpha Estella, w^ife of Willis Johnson, and they live in Licking county; 
Cary Douglas lives in Coshocton county; Aldice Ray, who lives in Harri- 
son township, Knox county; Leota is the wife of Ben John, and they live 
near Gambier, Ohio; Grover G. and Jesse Carlisle live at home. 



COLEMAN E. BOGGS. 

A member of one of the honored pioneer families of the locality of 
which this history treats, the name of Boggs has been closely associated with 
the history of this section of the Buckeye state, and Coleman E. Boggs, 
like his honored father before him, is counted one of our progressive agri- 
culturists. In business relations he has always been known to be straightfor- 
ward and reliable, is patriotic in citizenship, and his social relations ever 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 517 

wholesome. He is esteemed for these commendable traits of character to- 
gether with his cordial disposition and genuine worth. 

Mr. Boggs was born in Clay township, this county, December 2^, 1848. 
on a farm in Clay township, one mile west of Bladensburg. He is the son 
of Ezekiel and Sarah (Magee) Boggs, both natives of Belmont county, 
Ohio, of the vicinity of St. Clairsville. They grew to maturity, received 
their education and were married in Belmont county, and they moved to 
Knox county about 1830, in pioneer days, settling in Clay township, and 
engaged in farming, establishing a good home through industry and econ- 
omy, and here the elder Boggs became a substantial and prominent citizen. 
He was a Democrat in politics and was a leader in local affairs, his counsel 
being sought by candidates and his advice carried weight in all things. At 
one time he represented Knox county in the state Legislature for one term 
in an able and praiseworthy manner. He served as justice of the peace and 
as a member of the district school board. He held to the Presbyterian 
faith, but was not a church member. His death occurred in 1853, when a 
comparatively young man. His w'idow survived nearly forty years, dying 
on October 8, 1892, and both are buried in the Presbyterian cemetery at 
Martinsburg. Their family consisted of five sons and four daughters, 
named as follows: John M., Lucinda J., Jesse, William W. and Mary E. 
are all deceased; Coleman E., of this review: Martha F. is single and lives 
in Wheeling, West Virginia; Tabitha is deceased; Abraham, the third child, 
died in infancy. 

Coleman E. Boggs was reared on the home farm and educated in the 
public schools of Wheeling, West Virginia. After leaving school he clerked 
in a store in Bladensburg for three years, then began teaching school in 
1867 and continued constantly as a teacher until 1904 in the schools of 
Knox county and six years in the high school at Bladensburg, also five 
years in the Martinsburg high school, two of the most noted and best high 
schools in the smaller towns of Ohio. He taught six years in one country 
district and the first school he taught was so satisfactory that he was re- 
tained in that district for a period of seven years. He became one of the 
best known and popular educators in the county, his services being in great 
demand and he ranked high among his professional brethren irf this section 
of the state. He alternated teaching with farming, raising crops during 
the vacation periods. For nine years he was one of the board of three mem- 
bers of county schopl examiners and was universally recognized as one of 
the county's most progressive exponents of education. In the year 1904 he 
retired from the ranks of teachers, although not from those interested in 
educational progress. 



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5l8 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Politically, Mr. Boggs is a Democrat and he has always been interested 
in public matters and supported such measures as had for their object the 
general betterment of local conditions in any way. He has served as clerk 
of Clay township for about ten years, though he has never been an office 
seeker. Fraternally, he is a member of Colfax Lodge No. 184, Knights of 
Pythias, at Bladensburg, being a charter member of that lodge, and he has 
filled all the chairs in the same. While teaching he was a member of the 
Knox County Teachers* Association and also the Southeastern Ohio Teach- 
ers' Association and was an active participant in their discussions and was 
always an attendant at the annual meetings of the Ohio Teachers Associa- 
tion. He kept thoroughly in touch with all that was best in progressive 
education and he yet retains his membership in the Ohio Teachers Reading 
Circle. 

Since leaving the school room as teacher Mr. Boggs has been engaged 
in general farming and stock raising on his farm, four miles east of Mar- 
tinsburg in Clay township, his place consisting of thirty-two acres, and to 
this he gives his exclusive attention. He has never married. 

Mr. Boggs is not a church member, but he was reared in the Presby- 
terian faith and he has never departed from the belief of his parents. He is 
a regular attendant at church and Sunday school and is a liberal supporter 
of the church. He is a man of literary tastes and has accumulated an ex- 
cellent library. 



NEWTON R. EASTMAN, M. D. 

Only simple justice is done a biographical fact when we place the 
name of Dr. Newton R. Eastman, of Mt. Vernon, in the front rank of Kinox 
county physicians, a fact universally recognized throughout the locality by 
those at all familiar with his career. A gentleman of sound discretion, good 
judgment, scholarly attainments and a high order of professional ability, 
he has so impressed his individuality upon the community as to gain recog- 
nition also among its leading citizens and public-spirited men, and yet plain 
and unassuming in his every-day life, a man of the people, honest, honorable 
and obliging, always ready to support any movement having for its object 
the betterment of the city and county whose interests he has long had at 
heart. 

Doctor Eastman was born of a sterling old family at Bucyrus, Craw- 
ford county, Ohio, on November 11, 1871, and is the son of James W. and 



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NEWTON R. EASTMAN, M. D. 



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1 



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PUBLIC LI5KAKY, 

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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 519 

Katherine (Vance) Eastman. The Doctor's ancestry is accurately traced 
back to Warden Eastman, who emigrated from Wales to America in 1614 
and located in Ntw Amsterdam, now the city of New York, the Doctor 
being the fourteenth generation descended from him.* The father, James W. 
Eastman, was a man of influence in his community, and he was a soldier in 
the Civil war, a private in Company G, Forty-ninth Ohio Volunteer In- 
fantry, under Colonel Gibson, for whom he had worked on a farm as a boy. 
He served very gallantly for a period of three years and six months, and 
he was wounded during the battle of Atlanta. He is buried at Rock Creek 
cemetery at Tiffin, Ohio, and beside him lies the remains of his grandfather, 
Peter Ward Eastman, who died in 1777. The Doctor is a relative of the 
well known manufacturers of Eastman kodaks, also a relative of Doctors 
Eastman, prominent surgeons of Indianapolis, Indiana. Abigail Eastman, 
mother of Daniel Webster, was a sister of Peter Ward Eastman, mentioned 
above. Doctor Eastman's mother comes of a fine old Virginia family. His 
great-grandfather Vance was a great slaveholder and at the beginning of 
the Civil war he released a number of slaves. He was then well advanced in 
years and he died during the progress of the war. 

Doctor Newton R. Eastman received his early educational training in 
the schools of Bowling Green and Shelby and later attended Baldwin Uni- 
versity, from which he was graduated in 1890. The following year he 
began reading medicine in the office of the late John E. Russell, of Mt. Ver- 
non, where he remained one year, then entered Starling Medical College at 
Columbus, Ohio, where he made an excellent record and from which he was 
graduated in 1895. In April of that year he began practicing in Bellville, 
Richland county, this state, remaining there until January 4, 1908, when he 
came to Mt. Vernon, where he succeeded to the practice of his old preceptor. 
Dr. John El Russell, with whom he formed a partnership, but the death of 
the latter prevented its consummation. Doctor Eastman has remained in 
Mt. Vernon and he has enjoyed a very liberal patronage from the first, 
which has continued to grow with succeeding years until today he is re- 
garded as one of the leading medical men of this section of the state. He 
has a well-equipped office and, always an assidious student, he has kept 
well informed on everything pertaining to his profession. While in Rich- 
land county he was president of the board of United States pension exam- 
iners. In June, 1909, he was elected, at St. Louis, first vice-president of the 
Association of Baltimore & Ohip Railway Surgeons, which has a member- 
ship of nearly five hundred. He is company surgeon for the Baltimore & 
Ohio railroad and Pennsylvania railroad. He is a member of the Knox 

(34) 



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520 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

County Medical Society, the Ohio State Medical Society and the American 
Medical Association. Politically, he is a Republican, and fraternally he be- 
longs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Masons. 

Doctor Eastman is the only son in a family of four children; his sisters 
are Mattie, wife of R. P. Hall, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Morna is the 
wife of James E. Dykes, of Birmingham, Alabama; Edith is the wife of 
John DeVoe, of Mt. Vernon, Ohio. 

On February 3, 1897, occurred the marriage of Dr. Eastman and 
Katherine Schuler, daughter of Edwin and Jennie (Fitting) Schuler, the 
latter the daughter of Frederick Fitting, one of* the pioneer business men of 
Richland county and the man who built the Baltimore & Ohio railroad from 
Newark to Sandusky. Mrs. Eastman was bom at Covington, Kentucky, and 
she lived in Cincinnati, Ohio, until she was six years of age, then, upon the 
death of her father, the mother took her to Bellville. She is a lady of many 
estimable traits and, like the Doctor, is a favorite with a wide circle of 
friends and acquaintances. 

To Doctor Eastman and wife two sons and one daughter have been 
born, namely: Russell, born February 7, 1898; Robert, bom in 1900, and 
Jane, in 1902. 



W. W. STONEHOCKER. 

The medical fraternity in Knox county has in Dr. W. W. Stonehocker, 
of Bladensburg, a most worthy and able exponent, for during his years of 
successful practice in this locality he has won a wide reputation as a learned, 
painstaking and conscientious general practitioner, and he has long enjoyed 
a wide and ever growing patronage. He is a worthy representative of an 
honorable old Buckeye family and he has kept the even tenor of his way in 
such a manner that the luster of the family name has been augmented. 

Dr. Stonehocker was born in Coshocton county, Ohio, July 25, 1855. 
He is the son of John J. and Sarah (Wencklepleck) Stonehocker. The pa- 
ternal grandparents, Jacob and Elizabeth (Dicker) Stonehocker, were na- 
tives of Germany, from which country they emigrated to the United States 
in 181 2, locating in Coshocton county when the country was sparsely set- 
tled and the painted savage and all manner of creatures of the wild inhabited 
the far-stretching forests. The grandfather entered a farm of one hundred 
and four acres from the government, and here he set to work with a will 
and soon established a good home and had an excellent farm. This land 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 521 

is Still in possession of his descendants, having thus been in the family for 
an even century. 

On this farm the grandparents spent the remainder of their lives. He 
was a soldier in the war of 1812. They were the parents of ten children. 
The maternal grandparents of the subject were of Scotch descent and were 
also among the old settlers in Ohio. 

The father of the subject was bom in Coshocton county, this state, in 
1807, and the mother in Tuscarawas county, and they were married in that 
locality. He devoted his life to farming, owning an excellent farm. Their 
family consisted of eight children, two of whom died in infancy; six grew 
to maturity and four are living at this writing, the subject being the only 
one married. The father of these children was a Democrat in early life, 
but at the commencement of the Civil war he turned Republican, and while 
deeply interested in public affairs he was never an office holder. He was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church and was a man of exemplary 
character. His death occurred in Coshocton county in 1869, and his wife 
died in 1879. 

Doctor Stonehocker attended the public schools, and, having had a laud- 
able ambition from early life to enter the medical profession, he entered 
the Ohio State University, later the Jefferson Medical School at Philadel- 
phia, and he was graduated from the Columbus Medical School in 1881, 
having made an excellent record in all these institutions. Thus well equipped 
for his chosen life work, he located for the practice of his profession at 
Canal Dover, Tuscarawas county, Ohio, where he remained four years, en- 
joying an excellent practice from the start ; but seeking a wider field for the 
exercise of his talents, he came to Bladensburg, Knox county, in the spring 
of 1885, opening an office here in April and here he has since remained, 
having enjoyed a large patronage with the people of southeastern Knox 
county and adjoining counties, in fact, none of his professional brethren 
in the county has a more extensive practice, and he has met with singular 
success. Although a very busy man looking after his numerous {>atients, he 
has found time to keep fully abreast of the times in all that pertains to his 
profession, having ever been a student as well as a keen observer. 

Politically, the Doctor is a Republican, and while he takes the interest 
of a good citizen in public affairs, especially as affecting his community, he 
is not especially active in political matters, preferring to give his attention 
exclusively to his profession, in which he stands ver>' high in this part of 
the state- In fraternal matters he is a Mason, a Knight Templar, a member 
of the Order of the Eastern Star and the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles 



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522 KNOX COUNTY, OHia 

of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of the Knights of Pythias and 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His wife belongs to the EWsciples 
church. 

Doctor Stonehocker was married on April 14, 1904, to Mrs. Mae Allen, 
nee Myers, a native of Coshocton county, where she grew to womanhood 
and received her education. She is a lady of culture and many commendable 
attributes. She is the daughter of James and Elizabeth Myers, a prominent 
old family of that county. By a former marriage, Mrs. Stonehocker be- 
came the mother of one son, Oliver Allen. Her union with the Doctor has 
been without issue. They are pleasant people to know, hospitable, genial 
and alert to the best interests of society. 



ADAM SCOTT. 



One of the best known and most progressive agriculturists and stock 
raisers of eastern Knox county is Adam Scott, whose finely improved landed 
estate in Butler township never fails to attract the attention and admiration 
of the observer, for it indicates even at a cursory glance that the owner is a 
man of good taste, sound judgment and progressive ideas. He has been 
content to spent his life in his home community and carry onward the work 
here inaugurated by his ancestors in the pioneer epoch, for the Scott family 
has been prominent in this locality for several generations, consequently a 
history of Knox county would be incomplete were there failure to give 
proper space to them. 

Adam Scott was born in Jackson township, this county, on April 30, 
1868. He is the son of Lewis B. and Martha A. (Blunt) Scott. The pater- 
nal grandfather, Alexander Scott, was a native of Pennsylvania and an 
early settler in Coshocton county, Ohio, where he became a farmer and land 
owner. His family consisted of two sons and two daughters. He and his 
wife both spent the remainder of their lives in that county. The maternal 
grandparents, James and Mary (Ross) Blunt, were early settlers in Knox 
county and here they spent the balance of their lives; they were probably 
of English descent. 

Lewis B. Scott, father of the subject, was born in Coshocton county 
about 1838; the mother was born in Knox county about 1840. Here they 
grew to maturity and were married, Mr. Scott devoting his life to farming, 
owning one hundred and sixty acres at the time of his death in 1903, his 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 523 

widow surviving until in October, 1910. Politically, he was a Democrat 
and was active in township affairs, holding a number of township offices. 
Their family consisted of nine children, four sons and five daughters, seven 
of whom are living. 

Adam Scott, of this sketch, was reared on the farm and educated in 
the public schools. He began working by the month on farms in his native 
community, which he continued for six years, then married, and he in- 
herited a farm from his wife's people. He is now the owner of one hundred 
and twenty acres of excellent land, which he has kept well tilled and well 
improved. Here he carries on general farming and stock raising. He and 
his wife are members of the Baptist church. Fraternally, he belongs to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Newcastle and to the Grange in 
Butler township. Politically, he is a Democrat and he has been trustee of 
his township. 

Mr. Scott was married on January 25, 1894, to Minnie A. Horn, who 
was born May 6, 1874, in Knox county, the daughter of Abraham and 
Sarah Catherine (Giffin) Horn, an excellent old family here, both parents 
being reared in this township. Mr. Horn died October 7, 1906, his wife 
having preceded him to the grave on September i, 1883. They were the 
parents of two children, Minnie Adella, wife of Mr. Scott, and Mary Selora, 
who was bom January 27, 1877, and whose death occurred on April 10, 
1879. Mr. Horn devoted his life to farming and insurance, making a spe- 
cialty of fruits and l^ee raising, was also a dealer in furs and wool in the 
winter time. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Scott two children were bom, namely: Charles Lee, 
born September 3, 1895, and Elsie Marie, born January 28, 1899, both at- 
tending school in Newcastle. 

In view of the prominence of the antecedents of Mrs. Scott it is deemed 
advisable to go further into the history of the same. Her maternal grand- 
parents, Robert and Martha (Busenburg) Giffin, were natives of Virginia, 
he born on November 21, 1813, and she on February 11, 1821. They came 
to Coshocton county, Ohio, in a very early day and here they were married 
and spent their lives on a farm. The paternal grandparents of Mrs. Scott, 
Jacob and Kerren Happuch (Morningstar) Horn, were also early settlers 
here, he having been bom on January i, 181 5, in Washington county, Penn- 
sylvania, and in 1816 he was brought by his parents to Knox county, Ohio, 
where he grew to manhood and was married on March 12, 1843, his wife 
having been born in Virginia on March 10, 1818. They were the parents 
of six children, namely: Abraham, bom October 2, 1845, is deceased; 



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524 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Elizabeth, born June 7, 1847; William, born September 5, 1849; Solomon, 
born October i, 1857; Alonzo, born July 11, 1859, is deceased; Mary Ellen, 
born July 9, i860. These children were reared in this county. Abraham 
was the father of the wife of the subject. 

Robert Giffin came to Knox county with his parents and he located in 
Butler township in 1838, having been married the year previous to Martha 
Busenburg, and they became the parents of eight children, namely: Louisa, 
born March 28, 1839; Sarah Catherine, bom September 16, 1841 ; Amanda 
J., bom March 20, 1843; William B., born June 28, 1844; Mary Elizabeth, 
born August 9, 1847; Charles Francis, born September 20, 1850; Wilson 
Monroe, born June 5, 1853; Martha Ellen, bom March 7, 1858. The only 
ones now living are William B. and Mary Elizabeth. 



JOHN CALVIN HARRIS. 

One of the most painstaking and modern agriculturists of southeastern 
Knox county is John Calvin Harris, of near Bladensburg, Jackson township. 
He was fortunate in having good parents, who taught him from the start 
the duties of life — not ordinary instruction, but the higher duties which all 
owe to each other and to society. The result has been to give him broad 
ideas of life and its responsibilities and to fit him for upright and worthy 
citizenship. 

Mr. Harris was born in Bladensburg, Ohio, August 10, 1856, and is 
the son of Jesse and Elizabeth (Holtz) Harris. The paternal grandparents, 
Elijah and Sarah Harris, were natives of Pennsylvania and they came to 
Ohio in a very early day. He was a famier and he spent his last days here, 
becoming very well established through his industry, he and his wife dying 
in Clay township. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. The maternal 
grandparents, George and Susan Holtz, were also natives of Pennsylvania 
and from that state they, too, came to Knox county in pioneer times where 
they developed a good farm and spent the balance of their lives. 

The parents of the subject were married in this county and here the" 
father devoted his life to farming. He also conducted a tannery at New- 
castle for a number of years, in connection with which he also did some 
farming. He lived a quiet and retired life. His family consisted of seven 
children, six of whom grew to maturity, and five of them are now living. 

The death of Jesse Harris occurred on January 28, 1908, aged seventy- 
seven years, and his wife died on December 30, 1903, aged seventy-six years. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 525 

John C. Harris was educated in the public schools of his native com- 
munity and at Newcastle, and he went to school two years in Greene county, 
Indiana. When a young man he took up carpentering and farming, buying 
forty acres in Jackson township, which he later sold and bought fifteen acres. 
He now owns about forty-five acres in and around Bladensburg, also forty 
acres in Clay township. He farms in a general way and handles some good 
stock. For about twenty years he ran a nursery on his fifteen-acre farm, 
handling all kinds of fruit trees, and he became widely known in this con- 
nection. He made a special study of horticultural subjects and was very 
successful as a nurseryman, enjoying a large business. 

Politically, Mr. Harris is a Democrat, and while he takes the interest 
of a good citizen in public affairs, he is not a seeker after public honors. He 
has served his community as road supervisor. He and his wife are members 
of the Disciples church, and he belongs to the Patrons of Industry. 

Mr. Harris was married on August 31, 1880, tb Hattie Larason, a 
native of Knox county and the daughter of Thomas and Melinda Larason, 
old settlers here, he having come to Knox county from New Jersey, the 
father accompanying his parents, James and Elizabeth Larason, when he 
was one year old. Here the parents established a comfortable home and 
spent the rest of their lives here. The mother of Mrs. Harris was a native 
of Muskingum county, Ohio. Eleven children were born to Thomas Lara- 
son and wife, six of w^hom are living, two daughters and four sons. Two 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Harris, Odessa, who married 
Lloyd Hall, and Ethel, who lives at home. Mr. and Mrs. Hall are the 
parents of two children, Zelpha and John Thomas. 



WILLIAM McCOY MITCHELL. 

One of the farmers of Butler township, Knox county, who believes 
in adopting twentieth-century methods and in having system in whatever 
he attempts to do is William McCoy Mitchell, a public-spirited citizen who 
withholds his co-operation from no movement which is intended to promote 
public improvement. What he has achieved in life proves the force of his 
character and illustrates his steadfastness of purpose, and because of his 
many commendable characteristics he enjoys the good will and the friend- 
ship of his neighbors and acquaintances over the county. 



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526 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Mr. Mitchell was born in Allen county, Ohio, November 20, 1864. He 
is the son of William Ottawa Carter Mitchell and Sarah Ellen (Boyei) 
Mitchell. The paternal grandparents, Jonathan Mitchell and wife, were 
early settlers in Allen and Logan counties, having come from Virginia in 
the early forties, and they both died in Allen county. The maternal grand- 
father was a native of Scotland, from which country he emigrated to Amer- 
ica years ago, changing his name to Boyer from the original in order to 
escape military service. He finally married and came to Allen county, Ohio, 
where he sent the balance of his life. The mother of the subject was 
born in Allen county, Ohio, in 1839, and the father of William M. 
Mitchell was bom in Virginia in 1832. When a small boy he came to Ohio 
with his parents, and located in either Allen or Logan counties, and there 
he was married, in Allen county, and continued to reside there eight or nine 
years, and then, in 1872, moved to Millwood, Knox county, and engaged in 
milling until 1880, then moved to the Giffin farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres in Butler and Union townships, and there his death occurred on 
February 19, 1905. His wife is still living. In connection with his farm-, 
ing, Mr. Mitchell also ran a country store in the same building as his resi- 
dence until it burned in 1900. Politically, he was a Democrat, and he took 
an active part in public affairs He was one of the prime movers in estab- 
lishing the Millwood special district and he served on the school board there. 
He joined the Presbyterian church early in life and his wife belonged to the 
Methodist Episcopal, which he later joined. 

William M. Mitchell received his education in the public schools of 
Millwood and he was reared on the home farm and when a boy worked on 
the farm and in the mill. As a young man he followed school teaching for 
about five years very successfully, then went to farming, operating his 
mother-in-law's farm of thirty acres. In 1910 he purchased forty-seven 
acres of the old home place, although he has continued to live on the first 
place he selected as a permanent home. He has been very successful as a 
general farmer and stock man, being widely known as a breeder of Poland- 
China hogs. He has a good home and his place is well improved. 

Politically, Mr. Mitchell is a Democrat, and fraternally he belongs to 
the Grange and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Mitchell was married in 1885 to Rose Ellen Harbaugh, who was 
born on the f^rm where she still lives, and here she grew to womanhood 
and received her education in the common schools. She is the daughter of 
Benjamin and Sarah H. Harbaugh, the former of Tuscarawas county, Ohio, 
and the latter of Knox county, Ohio. The father died before the wife of 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 527 

the subject was born. The mother is still living. They had but one child, 
Rose Ellen, wife of Mr. Mitchell. 

To the subject and wife one son has been born, William Fletcher, a 
machinist by trade, who is living at home. 



WALTER C. RILEY. 

One of the worthy native sons of Mil ford township, Knox county, who 
has been content to spend his life right here at home, knowing that no bet- 
ter locality than this could be found in which to exercise the talent of gen- 
era! farming, is Walter C. Riley, a man who, however, would have suc- 
ceeded in whatever community he cast his lot, for combined in him are 
traits of character that never fail to win when properly applied, such as 
persistency, indefatigable energy and honesty of purpose. 

Mr. Riley was born in this township on February i6, 1867. He is the 
son of James and Catherine (Shearer) Riley. His paternal grandparents. 
William and Catherine Riley, were natives of Pennsylvania, in which state 
they grew up and were married and from there they emigrated to Ohio 
very early, locating in Ashland county, where they operated a good farm 
and reared their family, which consisted of eleven children, one of whom 
is now living. The maternal grandparents of the subject, Peter and Eliza 
(Young) Shearer, were also early settlers in Knox county, he having been 
born in Richland county, Ohio, in 181 1, and she in Pennsylvania, from 
which state she came with her parents to this county when five years of 
age, John Young and wife being early farmers here. Peter Shearer was a 
physician and practiced many years in Richland and Ashland counties, and 
he finally went to California as a physician for a prospecting company and 
there his death occurred while in the service of the company. 

James and Catherine Riley, parents of the subject, were natives of 
Ashland county, Ohio, his birth having occurred in 1832 and hers in 1839. 
There they grew to maturity, were educated and married. He received a 
fairly good education and for some time taught school, but farming was 
his principal occupation. He moved to Iowa county, Iowa, also spent two 
and one-half years in Missouri, engaged in school teaching and farming, 
returning to Ohio in 1862. locating in Knox county, and here resumed 
teaching school and farming, making a pronounced success of both He 
became owner of one hundred and fifty acres of land in Mil ford township 



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528 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

and had a good home there and was influential in the affairs of the com- 
munity. Politically, he was a Democrat, but not an aspirant for pubUc 
office. He and his wife belonged to the EHsciples church. His death 
occurred in 1873 and the mother remarried, her last husband being James 
Scott, who also is deceased. The mother of the subject is still living. 

Walter C. Riley was reared on the home farm and there he assisted 
with the general work about the place during the summer months when old 
enough. He received his education in the district schools of Milford town- 
ship, in the Pleasant Hill school. He turned his attention to farming for a 
livelihood early in life and first rented land for about eighteen months, then 
in 1905 bought sixteen acres on which he built a comfortable house and 
since then he has added to his original purchase until he now owns ninety- 
one acres of excellent land on which he makes a good living and which he 
has greatly improved, being one of the desirable little farms of Milford 
township. In connection with general farming he keeps some good live 
stock of various grades. 

Politically, Mr. Riley is a Democrat, and he takes more than a passing 
interest in public affairs, yet is no public man. He l3elongs to the Disciples 
church, and fraternally he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Grange. 

Mr. Riley was married in 1888 to Lillian B. Jackson, a native of Mil- 
ford township, this county, where she grew up and received her education. 
She is the daughter of Van and Orlean (Jackson) Jackson, one of the old 
and highly respected families of this part of the county. 

Four children have been born to the subject and wife, named as fol- 
lows: Relna Ray married Miss Edna Bell, and they have one child, Mar- 
guerite; Rowena; Opal and Otia are twins. 



WILLIAM PENN. 



Eighty-five years have dissolved in the mists of time, the most remark- 
able epoch in all the history of the race of mankind, since the venerable and 
honored William Penn, farmer of Middlebury township, Knox county, first 
saw the light of day. Heaven has bounteously lengthened out his life until 
he has seen the crowning glory of this, the most wonderful age in all the 
aeons of time, rewarding him with an unusual span of years as the result of 
virtuous and consistent living in his youth and years of his early manhood. 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 529 

Now in the golden Indian summer of his life, surrounded by comfort and 
plenty as a result of his earlier years of industry and frugality, Mr. Penn can 
take a retrospective glance down the corridors of the relentless and irrevoca- 
ble past and feel that his has been a useful, successful and happy life, a life 
which has not been devoid of obstacle and whose rose has held many a thorn ; 
but with indomitable courage he pressed onward toward the distant goal; a 
life of sunshine and shadow, of victory and defeat, but nobly lived and 
worthily rewarded as such lives always are by the Giver of all that is good. 
He comes down to us from the pioneer days when customs, manners, the 
face of the country, the people, everything was different. 

William Penn was born in Loudoun county, Virginia, April 8, 1826. 
He is the son of John and Mary (Chamblin) Penn. The paternal grand- 
father, William Penn, was a native of England, from which country he emi- 
grated to America in a very early day and settled in Maryland, where he spent 
the remainder of hi$ life. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. The mater- 
nal grandfather w^as a native of New England and he moved to Virginia in 
an early day. 

John Penn, father of the subject, was born in Baltimore county, Mary- 
land, within six miles of the city of Baltimore, in 1800, in which year the 
mother, Mary Chamblin, was also born, probably in Loudoun county, Vir- 
ginia. When a young man the father moved to Virginia and located about a 
mile from Harper's Ferry, having first married and lived a while in Loudoun 
county. He was a cooper by trade, which he followed for a period of thirty 
years. In 1834 he moved to Ohio and located in Richland county, a mile 
north of Waterford, where he continued to follow his trade for ten or twelve 
years, finally turning his attention to farming, and became the owner of one 
hundred and sixty acres. Politically, he was a Democrat, but never aspired 
to public offices, living a quiet retired life. His family consisted of eleven 
children, of whom five are still living, William, of this review, being the 
second in order of birth. The father was a member of the Methodist church. 
His first wife, mother of the subject, dying on April i, 1844, he subse- 
quently married Anzy Dyer. His death occurred in May, 1879. 

William Penn was educated in the district schools of his day, his op- 
portunities being none too extensive, but he has since made up for this 
lack through miscellaneous home study and contact with the business world. 
When eight years old he accompanied his parents to Ohio and here grew to 
manhood. He learned the cooper's trade under his father and followed this in 
connection with farming. When a young man he cleared a great deal of 
timber, and the country being new he found plenty of hard work in develop- 



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53^^ KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

ing the farm. He was married in 1853 to Ruth V. Clarke, a native of Knox 
county and the daughter of WilHam and Abigal (Owen) Clarke, who came 
here in pioneer times from Vermont. 

After his marriage the subject farmed exclusively and he is now the 
owner of one hundred and sixty acres and his wife owns eighty acres in Mid- 
dlebury township. He has built his dwelling, his bam, in fact, has made all 
the modern improvements seen on the place today, and has kept it under a 
high state of cultivation, carrying on general farming and stock raising in a 
very successful manner. He has made a specialty of raising Percheron horses. 
He is now living retired, leaving the management of his place to his son and 
son-in-law. 

In early life Mr. Penn was a Democrat and he helped elect three Demo- 
cratic Presidents, but when the Republican party was organized he allied him- 
self with this party, but for the past thirty years he has been a strong Prohi- 
bitionist, doing all in his power to further the work of the same in his com- 
munity. For six years he served as justice of the peace and for an equal num- 
ber of years was a notary public. As a public servant he always performed 
his duties most conscientiously and with eminent satisfaction to the people. 
He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, he having 
been a member since 1844 and she since 1854. Mrs. Penn, who is seventy- 
eight years old, is active and enjoys comparatively good health. The subject 
had three brothers in the Civil war, but he was not in the army. 

Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Penn, namely : Chloe E. 
is the wife of John Whitney, and they have two children, William Milton 
Whitney, a graduate of the Ohio State University, law department, now prac- 
ticing under the fimi name of Skeal & Whitney, of Seattle, Washington; he 
was also graduated from Wesleyan Ohio University and was a soldier in the 
Spanish-American war. His brother, Carl C. Whitney, lives at Frederick- 
town, this county. William C. Penn, the subject's second child, married Mary 
Graham and they have one daughter, Edna, who is yet single. The subject 
has one great-grandchild. 



JAMES E. GRAY, M. D. 

The practice of medicine entails perhaps more trying situations than 
that of any other profession, and those who succeed in this line are deserv- 
ing of the highest credit, for they must not only be well versed in the science, 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 53 1 

but must possess personal qualities that win the confidence and respect of the 
public. A case in question is that of Dr. James E. Gray, of North Liberty, 
Knox county, one of the best known and most successful physicians of a 
locality long noted for the high order of its medical talent, for his reputation 
extends throughout the locality of which this history treats. The qualities 
that have made him eminent in his chosen vocation are proper intellectual 
training, thorough professional knowledge and a utilization of the various at- 
tributes essential to success. 

Doctor Gray was born in Holmes county, Ohio, September 30, 1864. 
He is the son of George W. and Harriet J. (Quillan) Gray, the father bom 
in Killbuck township, Holmes county, on March 8, 1837, ^^^ ^^^ mother was 
bom in Harrison county, Ohio, February 8, 1844. The paternal grandparents 
were George and Mary Gray, who were natives of Maryland, the grandmother 
dying when young of an injury. George Gray came from Maryland to 
Holmes county, Ohio, and here became the owner of two farms, each of one 
hundred and sixty acres. The maternal grandparents, James and Elizabeth 
Quillan, were natives of Harrison county, this state, both born in 1818; his 
death occurred in 1907, while her death occurred in 1905. 

The Doctor's father grew up in Holmes county, Ohio, and was edu- 
cated in the district schools there and he has always lived in Mechanic town- 
ship, that county, being still engaged in farming there, owning an excellent 
place. He is a plasterer by trade. He and his wife are members of the Free 
Methodist church. 

Eleven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. George W. Gray, eight sons 
and three daughters, namely: Dr. James E., of this review, is the oldest; Mrs. 
Aurilla Leibensburger, of Oklahoma; Charles R. is living in Cuyahoga Falls, 
Ohio; Mrs. Alverna Ryan and Mrs. Fannie Heddin also lire at Cuyahoga 
.Falls ; Walter C. lives on a farm in Killbuck township. Holmes county, Ohio ; 
Clyde is a plasterer, living at Akron, Ohio ; Noble lives at Enid, Oklahoma ; 
Chloe is living in Cuyahoga Falls; Floyd and Don are the youngest of the 
family. 

Dr. James E. Gray first attended Gray's Ridge district school in Me- 
chanic township, Holmes county, Ohio, then attended the high school at Mil- 
lersburg. Then he taught school for a period of fifteen years in the district 
schools near his home, having begun to teach when only seventeen years old. 
He met with success as a teacher and his services were in great demand in 
the mral schools of Holmes county. During the last few years of his teaching 
he did the preliminary work for a medical course, studying under Doctor Quit- 
tard at Killbuck, Ohio. He then took a two years' course at the Starling Medi- 



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532 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

cal College at Columbus, Ohio, then spent two years at the Illinois Medical 
College at Chicago, from which he was graduated in 1898, having made an 
excellent record for scholarship. He then practiced for one year in Chicago 
with a specialist in gynechology, then located at Danville, Knox county, Ohio, 
remaining there two and one-half years, then in February, 1901, he came to 
North Liberty, where he has continued in the successful practice of his pro- 
fession to the present time, building up an extensive and ever growing prac- 
tice, covering a wide range of territory. He has taken a very high rank 
among his compeers in this part of Ohio, in the medical fraternity, and, hav- 
ing ever been a student, he has kept well abreast of the times in all that per- 
tains to his profession 

Doctor Gray and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and liberal supporters of the same. Fraternally, he is a member of the 
Maccabees. He belongs to the county and state medical associations, taking 
much interest in each. 

The Doctor's domestic life began on July 28, 1889, when he was united 
in marriage with Estella Gray, who was bom in Holmes county, Ohio, near 
Glenmont, on June 11, 1867. She is the daughter of Henry B. and Rachael 
Gray, the father a farmer near Glenmont. He and his wife were natives of 
northern Pennsylvania. 

Five children have been born to Doctor and Mrs. Gray, namely: Sylvia, 
born June 24, 1890; Walter H., born September 11, 1892; Dow, bom Decem- 
ber 3, 1893; Frances, bom April 3, 1895; James, bom December 5. 1897. 



HARRY C. YOUNG. 



One of Butler township's most progressive farmers and stock men is 
Harry C. Young, not that he farms on as extensive a scale as some of his 
neighbors, but he is not surpassed when it comes to scientific methods, thus 
he reaps fitting rewards for his toil from year to year, and he is a man of such 
correct habits of everyday life that he has always enjoyed the confidence and 
respect of all with whom he has come into contact. 

Mr. Young was born in Newcastle township, Coshocton county, Ohio, 
August 24, 1880. He received a common school education and was reared 
on the home farm. He began life for himself by working on rented land, which 
he continued to do for several years, then in 1907, he bought a farm of one 
hundred and twelve acres in Butler township, Knox county, upon which he 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 533 

moved in the fall of that year and here he has since resided, adding valuable 
improvements to his place from year to year and while yet young becoming 
very well established. Politically, he is independent and he and his wife belong 
to the Baptist church. Fraternally, he is a member of the Grange and the 
Maccabees. 

Mr. Young was married on February 12, 1903, to Ennis Sheldon, a 
native of Coshocton county, born May 27, 1881, and the daughter of Peter 
and Florence (Holt) Sheldon, both natives of that county, and each repre- 
sentatives of pioneer families there. To Mr. and Mrs. Young two children 
have been bom, namely : One that died in infancy and Ralph Dbnald. 

Peter Sheldon was bom in 1855 and his wife, Florence Holt, was born 
in 1859. Six children were born to them, namely: Harvey, deceased; Ennis, 
Lena, deceased; Walker, Lottie and Roy. 

The paternal grandparents of Mrs. Young were William and Hester 
(Smith) Sheldon, natives of Pennsylvania. The maternal grandparents, Jo- 
seph and Elizabeth (Workman) Holt, were also natives of Pennsylvania. 
Mary Holt, the great-grandmother, lived to be about ninety-three years of age. 

The death of Peter Sheldon, mentioned above, occurred in 1897, ^^^ 
Mrs. Sheldon re-married, her second husband being W. P. Root, and two 
sons were born to them. Marion and Burgess. She and her second husband 
are both living at this writing. 

Harry C. Young is the son of Barney and Elenora (Fry) Young. The 
paternal grandparents, Barnhart and Barbara (Frey) Young, were born in 
Germany and probably came to America while yet single and located in Cosh- 
octon county, Ohio. Mr. Young was a distiller, but he devoted his attention 
principally to farming after coming to America, becoming the owner of one 
hundred and twenty acres. He had a large family, several of whom died 
young. These parents spent the rest of their lives in that county. The maternal 
grandparents, Peter and Elenora (Branstool) Fr)% also lived in Coshocton 
county, whither he had come when a young man from Germany and took up 
fanning, becoming an extensive land owner, holding about one thousand 
acres in Coshocton county. There he reared his family and he and wife both 
died there. 

The father of the subject was l)orn in Coshocton county in 1854 and 
the mother was born there on March 24, 1860, and there they were reared 
and married. He took up farming and threshing and became the owner of 
one hundred and twenty acres. His family consisted of four children, namely : 
Harry C, of this sketch; Nelvin, Gladys and Clyde. 

Politically, Mr. Young was a Democrat, but he never sought office. 



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534 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

He lived a quiet home life. He was a member of the German Evangelical 
church. His death occurred on April ii, 1910. His widow survives, living on 
the home place in Coshocton county. 



FRED L. SINGREY, M. D. 

Proper intellectual discipline, thorough professional knowledge and the 
possession and utilization of the qualities and attributes essential to success 
have made Dr. Fred L. Singrey, of Mt. Vernon, K|nox county, eminent in 
his chosen calling while yet a young man, and he stands today among the 
scholarly and enterprising physicians and surgeons in a community long dis- 
tinguished for the high order of its medical talent. 

Doctor Singrey was born November 5, 1876, in Perry township, Mor- 
row county, Ohio, and he is the son of David and Charlotte (Boner) Sin- 
grey, who became well established there, for the father was a physician and 
was prominent in Morrow county for many years. His death occurred in 
1895 and his widow^ now makes her home with her son, Fred L., of this 
review. 

Doctor Singrey was educated in the country schools of Morrow county, 
later attended the high school at Johnsville, Ohio, in his native county, grad- 
uating from that institution with the class of 1892, after w^hich he taught 
school two years in Richland county, but not finding the work of teaching 
entirely to his liking and having long entertained a laudable ambition to 
take up the study of medicine he entered Starling Medical College at Co- 
lumbus, Ohio, in 1895, rn^de a splendid record and was graduated from 
that institution on April 14, 1898, being president of a class of one hundred 
and two. In May, 1898, he located at Amity, Pike township, Kiiox county, 
for the practice of his profession and remained there for eight years, during 
which he enjoyed a very extensive and lucrative practice, but seeking a 
wider field for the exercise of his talents, he came to Mt. Vernon in the 
fall of 1906, opened an office and has remained here to the present time, hav- 
ing been successful from the start, his reputation having preceded him. 

Doctor Singrey was married May 19, 1906, to Mina Belle Mix, daugh- 
ter of John and Anna (Blue) Mix, substantial farmers of Brown tow^nship, 
Knox county. This union has resulted in the birth of a daughter, Sylva G. 
Singrey. 

Politically, the Doctor is a Democrat and in 1900 he was elected 
coroner of Knox county and served one term very satisfactorily. He has 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 535 

never been very active in politics or an office seeker. He is a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks and the Knights of the Golden Eagle. His wife is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church and he affiliates with the same. 

Doctor Singrey is a man of robust constitution and imposing presence, 
a genial and companionable gentleman with a faculty of making friends 
easily and he has won a wide circle of friends since locating in Mt. Vernon. 
Mrs. Singrey is an intelligent and cultured lady who takes a delight in home 
life and their pleasant dwelling at No. 115 E^st Chestnut street shows that 
it is managed with rare taste and industry, and she is popular with the best 
social circles of the community. The Doctor has kept well abreast of the 
times in his profession, and his office, both for general practice and surgery, 
is modem and thoroughly equipped with every instrument and appliance 
for speedy and successful work, and he ranks high among his professional 
brethren as well as the general public. 



WILLIAM CALVIN LONEY. 

In this rushing, workaday age we have little time, it seems, for anything 
outside of our chosen vocations and avocations, but yet we cannot well help 
observing the conditions of life around us, and there is little that interests 
one more than to observe how differently men begin and continue the duties 
of life. Some commence in hesitation and seem to hesitate at every obstacle 
they encounter. Others begin boldly, but after a time show, by some defect in 
execution, that they have not properly mastered their tasks. Still others com- 
mence with steady grasp of the situation, and show by their subsequent ac- 
complishments that they have compassed the problem of life. To the last 
class success always comes and they are the men to leave behind them good 
names and large properties honorably won in life's struggle. Their descend- 
ants are left to reap the harvests of good actions. 

Among such active and enterprising people of Knox county are the 
Loneys, of whom William Calvin Loney, of Pike township, is a very worthy 
representative. He was born in this township on August 17, 1886, and he is 
the son of John Alva and Sylvia (Hibbitts) Loney. The paternal grandpar- 
ents, John Calvin and Mary (Ridenour) Loney, were well known here in the 
pioneer epoch, he having been born in Pike township, this county, and she in 
Hagerstown, Maryland. She came here very early with her parents and here 
grew to womanhood and was married, she and her husband still living here, 

(35) 



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536 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

being now advanced in years. The maternal grandparents, William and 
Arvilla (Brown) Hibbitts, w^ere also early residents of Knox county. She 
was born in New York in 1830 and when a mere child came to Ohio and was 
reared in Knox county. Mr. Hibbitts came to this county when a young man. 
He was a soldier in the Civil war, a private in the Sixty-fifth Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, and he was killed in battle in 1864. He was a cabinet-maker and 
undertaker by trade. His family consisted of three children, two of whom 
are living. 

The parents of the subject were both natives of Knox county and here 
they grew to maturity, received their schooling in the common schools and 
were married. The father started life as a traveling salesman when only six- 
teen years of age and he is still on the road, being one of the best known 
and most successful commercial travelers in this part of the country. He is 
now past fifty years of age. In politics he is a Democrat, and fraternally a 
member of the Maccabees. His wife belongs to the Methodist church. They 
are the parents of three children, James Elarl, William Calvin, of this sketch, 
and Royal Dwight. 

William C. Loney was educated in the public schools of Pike township 
and when twenty-three years of age he entered the mercantile business, buy- 
ing out a stock, and he has continued this business to the present time, meeting 
with much success all along, building up a large and gro,wing trade, now 
carrying a stock valued at about thirty-five hundred dollars. He has a neat, 
well arranged and attractive store, and always carries a large, up-to-date and 
carefully selected stock of goods, and his hundreds of patrons are always 
treated with every courtesy and consideration and the fact that many of them 
have been his constant patrons since ho first began business is evidence that 
they have received just treatment. His trade extends over a large radius of 
territory. He carries a general line of merchandise at all seasons. Politi- 
cally, Mr. Loney is a Republican, but he finds little time from his large busi- 
ness affairs to take any part in public matters. He takes an abiding interest 
in whatever tends to promote the welfare of the community and, personally, 
is an obliging, genial and industrious gentleman vN^iose character has ever 
been above reproach. 

Mr. Loney was married on August 17, 1909, to Sylvia L. Gray, a 
native of Holmes county, Ohio, and the daughter of Dr. James E. Gray, 
who for ten years has practiced medicine in this locality. One daughter has 
been born to the subject and wife, namely: Sylvia Marguerite. 

For a fuller ancestry of the subject of this review, the reader is re- 
ferred to the sketch of John Calvin Loney, appearing on another page of 
this work. 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 537 

JOHN CALVIN LONEY. 

We are carried back to the pioneer days when we contemplate the life 
history of John Calvin Loney, one of the honored citizens of Pike township, 
who needs no introduction to our readers, for he has spent his long and use- 
ful life in this locality, taking no little part nor mere passing interest in the 
transformation of the same. One could not spend an hour better, if one is 
interested in the history of the early days here, than to listen to his interesting 
and instructive reminiscences, for he has always been a keen observer and ha^ 
therefore seen and noted things as they are and he has an excellent memory, 
so that, covering a period of over three score years, we may look through 
an inverted horoscope, as it were, as the events of those decades troop before 
us in review. He has not only led a life of industry,, but one of honor, keep- 
ing singularly free from all besmirching agents the bright escutcheon of the 
family name, and therefore those who know him best are glad to honor him 
now that the twilight of age is gathering around. 

Mr. Loney was born in Pike township, this county, on January 29, 
1835. He is the son of John and Eliza (Kirkpatrick) Loney. The pater- 
nal grandparents, John Loney and wife, were natives of Harrison county, 
Ohio, their parents having been early settlers there from Virginia. They 
came to Knox county in a very early day and the grandmother was killed 
here by being thrown from a horse. Both are buried in this county. The 
grandfather of the subject was a shoemaker by trade, and he had saved six 
hundred dollars with which he established himself here, having spent the fir^t 
winter near Mt. Vernon and entered land from the government for himself, 
his father-in-law and children. 

The maternal grandparents of the subject, Hugh and Ann (Morrow) 
Kirkpatrick. were natives of Harper county, Maryland, his birth having oc- 
curred on June i, 1772, and her birth occurred on December 19, 1793. They 
came to Ohio in the early pioneer days and located first in Harrison county, 
then in Knox county, where they entered government land, which they de- 
veloped into a farm on w'hich they spent the balance of their lives. 

John Loney, father of the subject, was bom March 12, 1805, in Harrison 
county, Ohio, and his wife, Eliza Kirkpatrick, was bom in the same county 
on November i, 1804, and there they grew to maturity and were married on 
October i, 1829. The father devoted his life to agricultural pursuits. Po- 
litically, he was a Democrat, and he and his wife belonged to the Presbyter- 
ian church. Their family consisted of six children, two of whom are living 
at this writing, namely: John Calvin, of this review, and Mrs. Margaret Ann 



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538 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Ridenour. John Loney, the father of the subject, came to Knox county prior 
to his marriage, entered land in Pike township, then returned to Harrison 
county and there married, after which he came back to Knox county and es- 
tablished his home, becoming one of the large landowners here, owning five 
or six hundred acres, and he was one of the substantial and influential men 
of his day. His death occurred on October 5, 1891, at an advanced age, his 
wife having preceded him to the grave on November 3, 1868. He was twice 
married, his last wife being Arvilla Hibbitts. 

John C. Loney, of this review, was reared on the home farm where, 
when of proper age, he assisted with the general work, and he received his 
education in the common schools of his community. Early in life he took 
up farming for a livelihood and this has been his life work. He began by 
renting a farm in order to get a start, then purchased land, and prospering 
through close application and good management, he added to his holdings 
until he became owner of over six hundred acres, which he farmed on a large 
scale. He raised various grades of live stock, and, laying by a' competency, 
he gave away his large landed interests to his children, now owning only 
thirty acres on the outskirts of the town of North Liberty, and is now living 
practically retired from all activities, enjoying a well-earned respite. 

Politically, Mr. Loney is a Democrat, but he has always preferred to 
devote his attention to his family and business interests, leaving the cares 
of office to others. His wife is a member of the Lutheran church. 

Mr. Loney was married on December 13, 1855, to Mary Ridenour, daugh- 
ter of Daniel and Sarah (Bean) Ridenour, a highly respected old family of 
this county, having come here about 1852 from Hagerstown, Maryland. Nine 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Loney, named as follows: William 
Clarence, John Alva, Daniel W., Anna Alberta, Alice Belle, Bemice and 
Lizzie ; two infants died unnamed. 

Personally, Mr. Loney is a man whom to know is to respect and admire 
for his many estimable characteristics. 



DESAULT B. KIRK. 



The following is a brief sketch of the life of one who, by close applica- 
tion to business, has achieved marked success in the world's affairs and risen 
to an honorable position among the enterprising men of the city with which 
his interests are identified. It is a plain record, rendered remarkable by no 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 539 

Strange or mysterious adventure, no wonderful and lucky accident and no 
tragic situation. Mr. Kirk is one of those estimable characters whose in- 
tegrity and strong personality must force them into an admirable notoriety 
which their modesty never seeks, who command the respect of their contem- 
poraries and their posterity and leave the impress of their individuality upon 
the age in which they live. He is the scion of one of the worthiest and most 
prominent old families of this section of the Buckeye state, and his course 
has ever been such as to keep untarnished the bright escutcheon of the hon- 
ored family name. 

Desault B. Kirk, president of the New Knox National Bank and one of 
Mt. Vernon's prominent business men and loyal citizens, was born September 
21, 1846, in this city, the son of Robert C. and Eleanor (Hogg) Kirk, a com- 
plete sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this volume. 

The subject of this review attended the public schools of Mt. Vernon, 
and wiis later graduated from Kenyon College at Gambier, Ohio, with the 
class of 1869. He then entered Howard Law School where he made a splendid 
record and from which he graduated with the class of 1872. Soon after- 
wards he located at Toledo, Ohio, for the practice of his profession, re- 
maining there two years, being a member of the firm of Scribner, Hurd & 
Kirk. Returning to Mt. Vernon in 1875, he formed a partnership with Alfred 
R. Mclntire under the firm name of Mclntire & Kirk, which continued until 
1882, in which year he practically gave up the practice of law and entered 
the firm of C. & G. Cooper & Company, one of the pioneer engine manufac- 
turing concerns of the state. In 1905 the company incorporated under the 
name of the C. & G. Cooper Company, of which Mr. Kirk became treas- 
urer, which position he still holds, and the large and rapidly growing busi- 
ness of this firm has been due in no small degree to his able management of 
his department and his judicious counsel. 

In addition to his connection with this company, Mr. Kirk has various 
other interests of considerable magnitude. For years he has been connected 
with the Mt. Vernon Gas Company and is now its president and is manag- 
ing its aflfairs in a manner that reflects much credit upon himself and to the 
satisfaction of the stockholders. In 1877 he became connected with the 
Knox County National Bank as a director, this bank being the successor 
to the first bank established in Mt. Vernon. Before becoming a national 
bank under the congressional act authorizing national banks it was the Knox 
County State Bank, and at the expiration of its first charter as the Knox 
County National Bank under its new charter it became the New Knox 
National Bank, still bearing this title. Mr. Kirk later became vice-president of 



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540 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

the bank, and in 1907 became its president, which position he still holds and 
the duties of which he is discharging in an able and praiseworthy manner. 
It is perhaps as a banker that Mr. Kirk's talents are the most pronounced 
and in which he has performed a very extensive service to the people of this 
community, being able to foresee with remarkable accuracy the outcome 
of present situations and transactions, and at all times conservative and 
painstaking, keeping fully abreast of the modem methods of banking. He 
has long wielded a potent influence in the financial circles in this locality. 
Mr. Kirk also has valuable city properties and other real estate holdings. 
He has been very successful in whatever he has turned his attention to, and 
as a lawyer he was rapidly winning his laurels and becoming recognized 
as one of the painstaking, energetic and able advocates of the local bar, and 
no doubt had he continued in the legal profession he would have become 
one of the eminent attorneys of this section of the state. 

Mr. Kirk was married on May 20, 1873, to Mae C. Cooper, a lady of 
talent and culture, and the daughter of Charles and Isabella (Weaver) 
Cooper, a very prominent Mt. Vernon family and very actively connected 
with its industrial development and growth for many years. Four children 
have blessed this union, namely: Isabella married Benjamin Ames, of Mt. 
Vernon; Eleanor H. married John G. Ames, who is a professor in the Illi- 
nois College at Jacksonville, Illinois ; Robert C. married and is in business in 
Los Angeles, California; Charles C. is married and is in business in Chicago. 

Mr. Kirk proved his patriotism by enlisting in defense of the National 
Union during the Civil war for the one-hundred-day service in Company 
K, One Hundred and Forty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and he very 
faithfully served his term of enlistment during the closing months of the 
struggle. He has always been a Republican of the **stand pat" order, and 
while he has never found time to take as active a part as he would like to or 
cared to seek the honors of public office, he has kept well informed on cur- 
rent issues and has always readily supported such measures as had for their 
object the general advancement of his city, county and state as well as the 
nation. He is a member of the Masonic order, a Knight Templar and a 
Shriner. He belongs to the Joe Hooker Post of the Grand Army of the 
Republic. He and his family are members of the Episcopal church, of which 
he has been vestryman for a period of thirty-five years and senior warden 
for many years. He has long been active and prominent in church and 
benevolent work. 

**Elmwood.'' the beautiful, commodious home of the Kirks, is a most 
delightful spot and has long l>een the center of much of the social life of 
the community. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 54 1 

Personally, Mr. Kirk is a very pleasant, genteel gentleman, kind, affable 
and straightforward in all his business transactions, honest and unassum- 
ing, consequently he is popular with a wide circle of acquaintances and 
friends. 



L. C. STILLWELL. 



L. C. Stillwell, of Mt. Vernon, occupies a conspicuous place among the 
leading professional men of Knox county and enjoys the confidence and 
esteem of all who know him. His record demonstrates that where there is 
a will there is a way and that obstacles to success may be overcome by 
courage and self-reliance. His career has been a very active and strenuous 
one and has been fraught with much good to his fellow men and his ex- 
ample is cordially commended to the youth of the land whose life work is 
yet a matter for future years to determine, for his record forcibly illustrates 
what a life of energy can accomplish when one*s plans are wisely laid and 
one's actions governed by right principles, noble aims and high ideals. 

L. C. Stillwell was bom at Water ford, this county, February 4, 1868, 
and he is the son of Francis Marion and Catherine (Schell) Stillwell. The 
mother was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, and when a small child came to 
this section of Ohio; her father was of French and her mother of German 
blood. Francis M. Stillwell was born in Perry township. Morrow county, 
Ohio, of Scotch-Irish ancestr>\ His mother was well educated in German. 
She and her husband now live a retired life on a small farm near Marengo, 
Morrow county, Ohio, having devoted their lives to agricultural pursuits. 
The father is of a very long lived family. He is the son of Joseph and the 
grandson of Obediah and Sarah Stillwell, who came from Bedford, Penn- 
sylvania, to Knox county, Ohio, in a very early day, when a few cabins con- 
stituted the present city of Mt. Vernon. At that time Joseph Stillwell was 
about ten years old. They made the long trip in old-fashioned wagons and 
the woods was so dense and roads so few that they were compelled to cut 
their way through the forests a greater part of the way. They began life in 
typical pioneer fashion, entering one hundred and sixty acres from the gov- 
ernment, which they cleared and developed into a good farm, near Water- 
ford, now called Leverings, and there the old folks spent the balance of their 
lives. Sarah Stillwell reached the remarkable age of one hundred three 
years, six months and nineteen days. She was very hale and active in her 
old age and possessed all her faculties until she reached her one hundred and 



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542 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

second birthday. A brother of Obediah was a soldier in the Revolutionary 
war and captain of a Virginia company. 

L. C. Stillwell, of this review, lived on a farm until he was about eigh- 
teen years of age, assisting with the general work about the place and at- 
tending the common schools during the winter months at Waterford and 
later at Mt. Venion, after which he read law with W. M. Koons, of the lat- 
ter place. He then entered a law school at Cleveland, where he made a 
splendid record and from which institution he was graduated and he was 
admitted to the bar in June, 1891, to practice in the Ohio state courts. He 
was admitted to practice in the United States courts in October, 1894. Thus 
well equipped for his chosen vocation, he began practice at Fredericktown, 
Ohio, in 1891, and there he was not only successful in the practice of law, 
but he also soon became prominent in public affairs. He served two terms as 
mayor of Fredericktown, and after that he was city solicitor of Fredericktown 
for some time. In the fall of 1903 he was elected to the office of prosecuting 
attorney of Knox county and held the office three years. In the spring of 
1904 he moved to Mt. Vernon and took up his residence in East High street, 
and has since been engaged in the general practice of law; his popularity 
having preceded him, he has been successful from the first and now enjoys a 
large and ever growing clientele. He keeps fully abreast of the times in all 
matters pertaining to his profession and is painstaking, accurate, ever vigilant 
of his client's interests and in the trial of cases he has no superiors at the 
local bar. 

Mr. Stillwell has l>een identified with a number of corporations of Mt. 
Vernon. He is local counsel for the Pittsburg Plate Glass Company, gen- 
eral counsel for the Upham Gas Company in the states of Ohio, Indiana and 
Virginia. He is also general counsel for the Knox County Glass Company 
of Mt. Vernon, the Zeig Manufacturing Company, the Levering Brothers 
Mill & Elevating Company, also a number of other companies and institu- 
tions, making corporation practice a specialty and as a corporation lawyer 
he has no superiors and few equals in this part of the United States, his 
able work in this connection having attracted wide attention from time to 
time and bringing his name conspicuously before the general public. 

Politically, Mr. Stillwell is a Republican and he is an Episcopalian in 
religious belief. He has always been loyal to his party and as a public ser- 
vant acquitted himself in a manner that reflected much credit upon himself 
and to the eminent satisfaction of his constituents and the general public. 

On November 21, 1891, Mr. Stillwell was united in marriage with Ger- 
trude Blair, a lady of talent and culture, who was bom and reared at Lexing- 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 543 

ton, Ohio, but her ancestors were old residents of Mt. Vernon. Her great- 
grandfather, James Martin, donated the grounds of the original tract of land 
for the present cemetery of Mt. Vernon. He married Mary Warden, a 
member of one of the earliest pioneer families of Mt. Vernon. He was a 
soldier in the war of 1812, and he is buried in the cemetery for which he gave 
the land. James Blair, father of Mrs. Stillwell, was a soldier in the Civil 
war in an Ohio regiment. He now resides at Lexington, this state. He mar- 
ried Amanda King, brother of D. L. King, who served two years in the 
Civil war. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Stilhvell have been born one son and two daughters : 
Wendell, born November 20, 1893; Mandeline, bom January i, 1895; Ruth 
R., bom June 28, 1896. 

Fraternally, Mr. Stillwell is a member of the Modem Woodmen and 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He and his family attend the 
Episcopal church of Mt. Vemon. 

Personally, Mr. Stillwell is a gentleman of pleasing address, genial, 
obliging and a good mixer. By virtue of the offices and positions with the 
public and large corporations we must conclude that he holds a high position 
of honor and trust among his fellow countrymen else he would not have 
been called upon to fill such places, which usually go to men of sound moral 
and business principles. 



COL. WILLIAM C. COOPER. 

William C. Cooper, among the eminent lawyers, brave soldiers and 
congressmen from Ohio, was one of Knox county's honored sons. He came 
of good old American-bom ancestors on his father's side and of sturdy 
Scotch-Irish on the maternal side. He was the son of Thompson Cooper 
and the grandson of Daniel Cooper, both of whom were natives of Butler 
county, Pennsylvania, and who settled in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, in 1806. Daniel 
Cooper entered the army in the war of 181 2, holding the rank of captain. 
Thompson Cooper, the subject's father, came here when a mere boy, hence 
was reared among the scenes of true pioneer life in the wilds of this county. 
He served during his useful life as a justice of the peace for thirty and 
more years and was mayor of Mt. Vemon eight years. 

Col. William C. Cooper, of whom this more especially treats, received a 
public school education and attended the Mt. Vemon Academy. It was early 



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544 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

in life that he had an ambition to become a lawyer and commenced the study 
of law with Joseph W. Vance and James Smith, Jr. He was admitted to the 
bar at the age of twenty-two years and soon formed a' law partnership with 
his preceptor, Mr. Vance, this relation continuing until the death of Mr. 
Vance, who was killed in battle during the Civil war. The law firm closed 
its office and both entered the Union army, Mr. Vance as colonel and in 
command of his regiment when killed. Mr. Cooper was among the first to 
enlist in defense of his country's flag, becoming a first lieutenant in Company 
B, Fourth Ohio Infantry. He re-enlisted in 1864 and returned as colonel 
of the One Hundred and Forty-second Regiment, with which he participated 
in the great Petersburg campaign. 

At the conclusion of his second term Mr. Cooper returned home and re- 
sumed the practice of law. He became a member of the firm of Cooper, 
Porter & Mitchell. His diligence and faithfulness toward his clients was 
noted as exceptional. He was in every way a thorough lawyer — an honor to 
the bar of Ohio and Knox county. 

Politically, Colonel Cooper was a Republican; he seldom asked for an 
office, but was ever ready to aid the party of his choice and his council was 
frequently sought by those high up in office. Prior to the Civil war he had 
held the office of prosecuting attorney for four years. In i860 he was elected 
mayor of Mt. Vernon, serving two consecutive terms. In 1871 he was 
chosen to represent his district in the Legislature and at the close of his term 
declined the f>osition again. He was six years president of the board of 
education at Mt. Vernon and five years advocate-general of the state of Ohio. 
These are the only civil offices held by him until he was elected to the forty- 
ninth Congress in 1884. He was elected again in 1886 and 1888. As a 
debater on the floor and as a wise counselor in the various committee rooms, 
he was exceptionally strong and popular, being not only able, but very useful, 
just at that time in the halls of Congress. During his first term the bill pro- 
viding for the order of succession in the office of President was passed and 
he was a member of the committee in charge of the bill. His argument along 
this line was masterly and logical. He was also influential on the committees 
on elections, on territories, on banking and on currency. He managed several 
campaigns as chairman of the Republican state central committee and was 
the representative of the Republican party in Ohio in the national committee 
from 1876 to 1884, during the period of the greatest contention in the party, 
and was a delegate to the national conventions in 1872 and 1880. 

In January, 1864, Colonel Cooper was married to Eliza Russell, daugh- 
ter of pioneer Dr. John W. Russell, a physician of more than ordinary skill. 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 545 

who* for sixty years practiced medicine in Mt. Vernon. Two daughters 
were bom to Mr. and Mrs. Cooper. 

Colonel Cooper's army relations naturally brought him in close touch with 
the Grand Army of the Republic after the end of the civil strife and he twice 
represented his state in the national encampment of this soldier fraternity. 
His citizenship was ever characterized by unswerving loyalty to the best in- 
terests of city, county, state and nation, and by mastery of every subject upon 
which his actions could have direct or indirect bearing; socially, he was most 
popular and he knew how to win and hold friendship. Professionally, he 
was most talented and prominent, his comprehensive understanding of the 
principles of jurisprudence* combined with his logic and power of argument, 
rendering him one of the most able members of the Ohio bar. Such is the 
record of one who for more than seventy years was an honored citizen of 
Mt. Vernon. 

On August 29, 1902, as the autumn of that year was just being ushered 
in, his soul took its flight from earth and his remains are buried in Mound 
View cemetery, Mt. Vernon, which city had always been his home. His 
family monument marks the resting place of a man who had always per- 
formed every known duty to his fellow man, and been loyal to the country 
in which he lived and labored so many years. 



FRANK CARTER LARIMORE, M. D. 

There is no class to whom greater gratitude is due from the world at 
large than the self-sacrificing, sympathetic, noble-minded men whose life 
work is the alleviation of suffering and the ministering of comfort to the 
afflicted to the end that the span of human existence may be lengthened and 
a great degree of satisfaction enjoyed during the remainder of their earthly 
sojourn. There is no standard by which their beneficent influence can be 
measured ; their helpfulness is limited only by the extent of their knowledge 
and skill, while their power goes hand in hand with the wonderful laws of 
nature that spring from the ver>' source of life itself. Among the physicians 
and surgeons of Knox county who have risen to eminence in their chosen 
field of endeavor is Dr. Frank Carter Larimore, of Mt. Vernon, whose career 
has been that of a broad-minded, conscientious worker in the sphere to which 
his life and energies have been devoted and whose profound knowledge of 
his profession has won for him a leading place among the most distinguished 
medical men of his day and generation in this section of the Buckeye state. 



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546 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Doctor Larimore was born on April 12, 1846, on North High street, 
Columbus, Ohio. He is the son of Robert and Susan A. (Dodridge) Lari- 
more. The father, a native of Hampshire county, Virginia, emigrated to 
Ohio in the early days and he was a contractor engaged in the construction 
of the Ohio canal. Later he superintended the stone quarries from which the 
stone was taken for the construction of the present state house at Columbus. 
He was later superintendent of the Woodbridge estate, manufacturers of 
charcoal, pig iron and other industries in southern Ohio. His death occurred 
in Chillicothe, this state, in 1856. His wife was the daughter of Joseph Dod- 
ridge, of Wellsburg, West Virginia, who was an Episcopalian minister and 
who supplied the first Episcopalian church west of the Alleghany mountains. 
He was graduated from Rush Medical College at Philadelphia and his 
diploma bears the signature of Dr. Benjamin Rush, who was a signer of the 
Declaration of Independence. The mother of the subject died in Mt. Ver- 
non. These parents were each married three times. The subject was one of 
four children, two of whom are now living, the other being Mrs. Lucy Wells 
Campbell, of San Francisco. 

Doctor Larimore was the son of poor parents and after his father s 
death he was entrusted to the care of an uncle, Thomas Larimore, and his 
son, Capt. Henry Larimore, of near Lock, Knox county, both of whom were 
very solicitous of the subject's welfare and gave him every opportunity. He 
attended the country schools and worked on the farm, receiving the best of 
training and discipline under the gentlemen mentioned above. In Septem- 
ber, j 861, he enlisted in Company G, Twentieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and 
he served very faithfully in the Western army, being wounded at Pittsburg 
Landing, April 7, 1862, in the knee and both hands by a cannon ball, which 
at the same time wounded William Barrible and William Philo, the former 
dying by the side of Mr. Larimore in a hospital bed at Mound City, Illinois. 
William Philo is still living, being a prominent business man at Akron, Ohio. 
As soon as he was able, the subject returned home and in time recovered from 
his wounds and again enlisted, becoming fifth sergeant of Company B, One 
Hundred and Forty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, serving four months 
under General Butler on the Appomattox river, fourteen miles from Rich- 
mond. He was, according to his comrades, a very gallant soldier and never 
shirked his duty, however hazardous. 

After the war young Larimore returned to Ohio and attended the public 
schools at Utica and he taught school in his home district for two winters. His 
uncle decided that the subject would not make a good farmer on account of 
his wounds and insisted that he take up the study of medicine, which he ac- 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 547 

cordingly did in the office of Drs. Matthew Thompson and Smith on March 
20, 1865, in Mt. Vernon. He took his first course of lectures at Ann Arbor, 
Michigan, in 1866 and 1867. After the death of Dr. Matthew Thompson, 
on June 19, 1867, the subject became a student under Dr. John \V. Russell, 
Sr., remaining in his office one year. He attended his last course of lectures 
at Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York, from which he was grad- 
uated on March 29, 1869. Thus exceptionally well equipped for his life 
work, he began practicing medicine and surgery in June, 1869, and the 
same year he became a member of the Knox County Medical Society and 
the Ohio State Medical Society. In June, 1872, he joined the American 
Medical Association at its annual session in Philadelphia and sailed for 
Europe a few days later to make a study of hospital conditions of that coun- 
try. He remained abroad one y^ar, taking a six-months post-graduate course 
of instruction at Vienna, in order to further equip himself for his work. Re- 
turning to America in June, 1873, he resumed practice in Mt. Vernon and 
here he has since remained as a general practitioner and surgeon, making a 
specialty of surgery and winning a wide reputation for his skill and uniform 
success in both, enjoying a large and ever growing patronage and taking a 
very high rank among his professional brethren throughout the state who 
recognize him as having few peers and no superiors. He has always been a 
student and has kept well abreast of the times in all that pertains to his pro- 
fession. A new incentive to excel in surgery was brought about by attending 
lectures and operations of Dr. Joseph Lister, the father of aseptic surgery, 
in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1872. He has met with remarkable success in 
this line. 

Doctor Larimore has been a member of every local and district organi- 
zation in this section and has been honored by the highest positions in each of 
them. In 1896 he was elected president of the Ohio State Medical Society, 
and he presided with rare ability at the annual meeting held in Cleveland in 
May, 1897. He was the first to practice the new surgery in this section and 
the first to use the hypodermic syringe and to use cocaine as a local anes- 
thetic. The Doctor is a writer of no mean ability on medical subjects and he has 
been a frequent contributor to medical journals on various subjects of medi- 
cine and surgery, and he enjoys the well deserved distinction of having per- 
formed more surgical operations than any surgeon, dead or living, in Knox 
county. 

Doctor Larimore was married on December 30, 1875, to Mary Frances 
Odbert, daughter of Thomas and Mary Elizabeth (Hughes) Odbert, a prom- 
inent Mt. Vernon family, their daughter being well educated and a lady of 



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548 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

culture and refinement. This union has been graced by the birth of three 
daughters, namely : Ehzabeth, who married William H. McKinley, of Cam- 
bridge, Pennsylvania ; Mary is deceased ; Harriet is at home. 

In his political relations Doctor Larimore has always been loyal to the 
Republican party and active and influential in public matters. He has been a 
member of the United States pension examining board ever since its crea- 
tion in 1884; he has served as a member of the Mt. Vernon board of educa- 
tion and as city councilman. Fraternally, he belongs to the Masonic order 
and is also a member of Joe Hooker Post, Grand Army of the Republic, and 
the Union Veteran Legion. He and his family are members of the Baptist 
church and have always been active in church and Sunday school work and 
actively identified with the interests of the church. The Doctor was for 
years superintendent of the Sunday school. He has an attractive, commod- 
ious and modernly furnished home at No. 206 North Main street, which is a 
favbrite gathering place for the many friends of the family which has long 
been prominent in the social life of the community. 

Doctor Larimore built the first apartment house in the city in 1895 at 
the southwest comer of Main and Chestnut streets, where his well equipped 
and tasty offices are maintained. In 1904 he redeemed one of the most for- 
bidding sites in Mt. Vernon by the erection of a modern, up-to-date building, 
the Union block. He has always been alert to the city's best interest and has 
supported all movements having as their object the general improvement of 
the city and community. He is the owner of much valuable city property. 

In the years 1907 and 1908 the hold of Doctor Larimore on life was frail 
and precarious, a serious ailment attacking him which necessitated three 
severe abdominal operations, the last one, performed on August 4, 1908, prov- 
ing successful and completely restoring him to health. 

The Doctor has traveled extensively both in Europe and the United 
States, and, being a keep observer, with well develoi>ed perceptive faculties, 
he has been greatly benefited in this manner, and is an intelligent talker on any 
topic, an obliging, genial, charitable and cultured gentleman whom it is a 
pleasure to meet. 



ROBERT C. KIRK. 



Although Robert C. Kirk has long been sleeping the sleep of the just, he 
is still remembered by most of the citizens of Knox county who knew him 
"in life's morning march when the bosom is young' and w^ho were influenced 
by him to make the most of life and the opportunities that came to them, for 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 549 

he is described as a man of many sterling qualities of head and heart, honest, 
energetic, kind, noble and patriotic. He gained a conspicuous position in 
public life and, having ably performed his tasks, became one of the distin- 
guished men of the Buckeye state of a past generation. 

Mr. Kirk was born February 26, 182 1, at Mt. Pleasant, Jefferson county, 
Ohio. His parents were both natives of Pennsylvania. His father, Eli Kirk, 
was a farmer and his death occurred in 1838, the mother surviving until she 
reached the age of eighty-two years. 

Robert C. Kirk attended the district schools and later the Ohio Univer- 
sity at Athens. Uf>on leaving college he entered the office of Dr. William 
Hamilton at Mt. Pleasant to study medicine and later he attended the medi- 
cal department of the old university at Philadelphia, from which he was 
graduated, whereupon he went to Fulton county, Illinois, where he began the 
practice of his profession. In 1843 he returned to Mt. Vernon, Ohio, and 
abandoned medicine for the mercantile life. In the spring of 1844 he en- 
gaged in the dry goods business in Mt. Vernon with T. W. Rogers, which 
partnership continued until the death of Mr. Rogers. He then formed a part- 
nership in the same business with his father-in-law, John Hogg, which con- 
tinued until 1853, when the firm sold out. In 1857 he went to Winona, 
Minnesota, and engaged in the real estate business with his brother, returning 
to Mt. Vernon in 1858, which remained his residence until his death. He had 
been very successful both as a physician and as a merchant and proved him- 
self to be a strong, energetic and capable man of affairs. 

Mr. Kirk was always a stanch Republican in politics and always active 
in party affairs and a man of strong character and convictions. In 1856 he 
was elected to the Ohio state Senate and served one term with distinction to 
himself and with satisfaction to his constituents. In 1859 he was elected 
lieutenant-governor of Ohio, and in 1862 President Lincoln apf>ointed him 
minister to the Argentine republic and during his residence at Buenos Ayres 
he successfully settled all the old claims due American citizens, amounting 
to over four hundred thousand dollars. These claims originated in 18 14 and 
were abandoned by former ministers. Over nineteen thousand dollars was 
sent from Buenos Ayres to Mr. Bellows, president of the United States Sani- 
tary Commission, for the benefit of our soldiers during the Civil war, during 
Mr. Kirk's residence there as minister. After a most praiseworthy tenure of 
office there for four years, he resigned in 1866 and returned to Mt. Vernon, 
Ohio. In 1869 he was appointed by President Grant to the same position, 
which he held until 1871, when he again resigned and in January, 1872, he 
returned to his home in Mt. Vernon. In February, 1875, he received from 



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550 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

President Grant the appointment of internal revenue collector for the thir- 
teenth Ohio district, of which Knox county was a part. This crffice he held 
with his usual success until there was a consolidation by Congress of revenue 
districts and the office was removed to Columbus, Ohio. 

On Dtecember ii, 1843, ^^- Kirk was united in marriage with Eleanor 
Hogg, daughter of James Hogg and wife, one of the prominent early families 
of Mt. Pleasant, Ohio. This union resulted in the birth of four children: 
John E., the eldest son, served through the Civil war in the Ninety-sixth 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry and he died at Mt. Vernon in January, 1873, at the 
age of twenty-nine years; Desault B., a complete sketch of whom appears 
elsewhere in this work ; Plempton and William H. were twins. 

In public affairs Mr. Kirk took a deep interest, was always fully abreast 
of the times in current issues, well informed, profoundly educated, a keen 
observer and a man of dauntless courage. He unquestionably possessed the 
qualities which typify the gentleman and because of his many commendable 
attributes and his exemplary life he was one of the best known and most highly 
esteemed men of his day and generation in this section of Ohio and he num- 
bered his friends by the scores wherever he was known, many of whom were 
the leading men of the nation. 



ANDREW D. WELKER, M. D. 

In his chosen field of endeavor Dr. Andrew D. Welker, of Gambier, 
Knox county, Ohio, has achieved success such as few attain, and his present 
standing among the leading medical men of this section of the Buckeye state 
is duly recognized and appreciated, not only in his own city and county, but 
also throughout this locality. In addition to his long and creditable career 
in one of the most useful and exacting of professions, he has also proven an 
honorable member of the body politic ; rising in the confidence and esteem of 
the public, he has filled worthily high and important trusts and in every rela- 
tions of life has never fallen below the dignity of true manhood nor in any 
way resorted to methods and wiles that invite criticism or censure. As a 
citizen he easily ranks with the most influential of his vicinity where he has 
long been a power. His course has ever been above suspicion and those 
favored with an intimate acquaintance with him are profuse in their praise 
of his many virtues and upright character. 

Doctor Welker was born on October 22, 1847, ^" Howard township, 
Knox county. He is the son of William Elliott Welker and Rachael (Dur- 



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ANDREW D. WELKER, M. D. 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 55 1 

bin) Welker. Abraham Welker, the great-grandfather, came from Wash- 
ington county, Pennsylvania, to Howard township, Knox county, Ohio, in 
the latter years of the eighteenth century when this country was a wilderness 
and the home of the Indian and wild beast, probably about 1790, when there 
were only a few settlers in the county. He settled on the edge of what was 
known as the Indian field, containing about forty acres of cleared land. Even 
the Indians knew nothing of when or by whom it had been cleared. Here the 
family settled, developed a farm and became identified in the settlement of 
the new country. Paul Welker, the subject's grandfather, was a soldier in 
the war of 1812 and was in the Hull surrender at Detroit, an important event 
in that war. In private life he was a farmer and fond of hunting, spending 
much of his time in the woods with dog and gun. His brother, Andrew 
Welker, was also a soldier in the war of 1812. They were in the command 
of Col. Lewis Cass, prominent in the history of that period. 

William Elliott Welker, father of the subject, was a farmer and owned 
a good farm in Howard township, this county, where he lived and died. He 
also teamed for some time for a merchant of Kinderhook, now called How- 
ard. He was a man of industry' and exemplary character. The Durbins 
were also an early pioneer family. Benjamin Durbin, the great-grandfather, 
came with his family from Maryland and engaged in milling in College town- 
ship. Grandfather Samuel Durbin was also a farmer and miller. The family 
of William E. Welker and wife was composed of three sons and one daugh- 
ter, namely: Andrew D., of this review; Sarah E. is deceased; Lewis G. 
lives in Mt. Vernon ; Alexander E. is a practicing physician in the West. The 
father, William E. Welker, died on December 25, 1891, and his widow died 
in January, 1905. He was a Republican in politics and was always interested 
in public affairs. 

The son, Andrew D., of this sketch, grew up on the home farm and 
engaged in the general farm work. He attended the country district schools 
and later a select school at Millwood. Later on he taught school for three 
years. He began his medical studies under Dr. D. S. Coleman, Dr. William 
T. McMahon and Dr. Robert Moffett, of Millwood. He spent the winters of 
1870, 1 87 1 and 1872 in the Louisville Medical College at Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, receiving his degree in the spring of the latter year, having made a 
good record for scholarship there. When General Morgan was in Congress 
from the Mt. Vernon district he furnished the subject a scholarship in the 
college mentioned above. Doctor Welker came to Gambier, Ohio, after his 
graduation and here began the practice of his profession and here he has since 
remained, having enjoyed a liberal and ever growing practice with the entire 

(36) 



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552 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

community, ranking high among the leaders of a community noted for the 
excellency of its professional talent. He has been very successful as a gen- 
eral practitioner and has kept well abreast of the times in all matters per- 
taining to his profession, having ever been a profound student of medical 
science. 

Doctor Welker has been twice married, first in 1870 to Louisa White, 
daughter of Anthony and Kizzian (Wade) White, a prominent family of 
Howard township, Mr. White having been a large landowner and an in- 
fluential citizen. His death occurred in 1868. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Welker two children were born, Minnie, deceased, 
and Sarah E., who is at home. The wife and mother died in August, 1875. 
The Doctor's second marriage took place in May, 1878, to Frances E. Col- 
will, daughter of Simon and Ann (Heard) Colwill, who came from England 
in 1835 and settled near Gambier, Knox county, Ohio. To this second union 
one son was born, Vincent B., who lives in Gambier. 

Doctor Welker is a member of the County Medical Society, the State 
Medical Society and the National Medical Association, and he has always 
taken much interest in these societies. Politically, he is a Democrat. He is 
a member of the Gambier board of education and is at this writing president 
of that body. He has served in the town council and as health officer for a 
numl^er of years. He is the owner of a fine farm near Howard, which joins 
the old Indian field. Here is carried on, under his general supervision, gen- 
eral farming and stock raising. His place consists of one hundred and eighty 
acres, well improved and well kept. Besides this excellent farm he has a 
modern and attractive home in Gambier. The Doctor belongs to the Catho- 
lic church. 

Doctor Welker started in life a poor boy and he entered his profession 
with nothing but courage and character of a high order, and with this de- 
termination to win he has succeeded not only in his profession, but he has 
acquired an ample competency for his declining years, at the same time 
winning the confidence and esteem of a very wide circle of friends and* ac- 
quaintances. 



WALTER B. JOHNSON. 

There are individuals in nearly every community who, by reason of pro- 
nounced ability and force of character, rise above the heads of the masses 
and command the unbounded esteem of their fellow men. Characterized by 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. ' 553 

perseverance and a directing spirit, two virtues that never fail, such men 
always make their presence felt and the vigor of their strong personalities 
serves as a stimulus and incentive to the young and rising generation. To 
this energetic and enterprising class Walter B. Johnson, the present popular 
and efficient postmaster at Fredericktown, Knox county, very properly be- 
longs. Having never been seized with the roaming desires that have led many 
of our young men to other fields of endeavor and other states, where they 
have sought their fortunes, Mr. Johnson has devoted his life to industries at 
home and has met with a fair measure of success all along the line, as we shall 
see by a study of his life history. By his advocacy of wholesome living, pur- 
ity in politics and honesty in business, he has long enjoyed the undivided re- 
spect and esteem of all who know him, being regarded as a worthy citizen and 
representative of a sterling old pioneer family. 

Mr. Johnson was lK)rn on March 2, 1855, in Fredericktown. He is the 
son of James and Margaretta (Glime) Johnson, the father having been bom 
in Washington county, Pennsylvania, on a farm near the birthplace of James 
G. Blaine. Mrs. Johnson was born in Carlisle, Cumberland county, Pennsyl- 
vania. The grandparents, on both sides of the house, came to Ohio in an 
early day, locating first in Guernsey county, and there the parents of the 
subject were married. The first years of their married life were spent at 
Wheeling, where Mr. Johnson was engaged in the mercantile business; later 
they moved to Claysville, Guernsey county, this state, and there Mr. Johnson 
continued the mercantile business until 1853, when he moved to Frederick- 
tow-n, Knox county, and here the father of the subject continued merchan- 
dising until 1871, when he moved with his family to Waterloo, Indiana, and 
there opened a store, which he continued to conduct until 1881, in which 
year he moved back to Fredericktown, and here he lived retired until his 
death, on November 25, 1891. He had been very successful as a merchant 
and enjoyed a good trade in all the places that he conducted a store, always 
gaining the confidence of the people and doing business on an honest basis. 
The death of his wife occurred on April 25, 1891. They are buried in For- 
est cemetery at Fredericktown. The father was a life-long Republican and 
always took an active interest in public affairs. He and his wife were both 
members of the Presbyterian church, he being an elder in the same for many 
years and active in church and Sunday school work. 

Walter B. Johnson was educated in the public schools of Fredericktown, 
and while in school assisted his father in his business as much as possible, and 
he clerked in his store during the time that the family lived in Waterloo, In- 
diana, and for a time he was on the road as a traveling salesman. When the 



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554 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

family returned to Fredericktown, the subject and his brother, Jesse G., 
formed a partnership with Cyrus Hosack, under the firm name of Johnson 
Brothers & Company, and engaged in the dry goods business. This firm con- 
tinued from 1882 to 1888, when the firm dissolved and discontinued business, 
after six years of continuous success. Mr. Johnson then engaged in the 
general life insurance business, principally with the Equitable of New York, 
in which he continued until November 15, 1897, having built up a large 
patronage. In that year he was appointed postmaster at Fredericktown by 
President McKinley, and he has continued to discharge the duties of this 
office to the present time with a fidelity to duty that has won the hearty com- 
mendation of the department and the people and in a manner that reflects 
much credit upon himself. At that time this was a fourth-class office, but 
about fourteen months later it was advanced to the third class. In this class 
there are ten grades of offices according to their receipts, and Fredericktown 
is now in the eighth grade of the fourth-class offices, coming very near the 
point of advancement to a second-class office. When Mr. Johnson was ap- 
pointed postmaster there were no rural route deliveries. Now there are seven 
from the Fredericktown office. The first route established in Knox county 
was secured through the efforts of Mr. Johnson. This route was operated out 
of Fredericktown and it was also the second route in the fourteenth Ohio 
congressional district. This route covers territory about sixteen miles in 
diameter and has brought a large amount of business to the Fredericktown 
office, the business here now requiring ten postal employes in connection with 
the handling of mail. There were only two when Mr. Johnson assumed 
charge of the local office. 

When the subject's father came to Fredericktown he purchased property 
from the grandparents of Hon. Frank Hitchcock, now postmaster-general, 
and the grandparents of the latter are buried in Forest cemetery here. 

Mr. Johnson has always been a Republican in politics and has long been 
active in party affairs. Prior to his appointment as postmaster, he was a 
member of the Republican county central committee and for some time he was 
a member of the Republican county executive committee, and a frequent dele- 
gate to county, district and state conventions. He served four years in the 
town council and was also justice of the peace for one term and he is now 
secretary of the Forest Cemetery Association and he has l)een a member of 
the cemetery board for over twenty years. In all positions of public trust he 
has performed his duties most faithfully and conscientiously, always to the 
satisfaction of the public. 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 555 

Mr. Johnson was married on August 24, 1899, to Julia C. Castner, 
daughter of Samuel J. and Mary A. (McFarland) Castner. The father was 
bom in Philadelphia. Grandfather Jacob Castner at one time owned the 
land now comprising the campus of Bryn Mawr College. Samuel J. Castner 
came to Fredericktown in 1867 from Woodbury, Bedford county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and he was engaged in the harness business, but before coming to this 
state followed farming in connection with the harness business. He was a 
Republican in politics and served in the Pennsylvania Legislature and was 
justice of the peace for a period of thirty-seven years in Bedford county, 
Pennsylvania. He was of the Quaker faith and was a prominent man in his 
community. His death occurred in May, 1908, and his wife died in March, 
19 10. They are both buried in Forest cemetery, Fredericktown. 

Mr. Johnson is a member of the Masonic order and he and his wife 
belong to the auxiliary Order of the Eastern Star. They are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is a member of the official board 
and has been for several years. He is active in church and Sunday school 
work. Mrs. Johnson is a member of the women's organizations of the church 
and active in the work of the same. 



PATRICK A. BERRY. 

Characterized by breadth of wisdom and strong individuality, the 
achievements of Patrick A. Berry, judge of the probate court of Knox county, 
but represent the utilization of innate talents in directing eflforts along lines in 
which mature judgment, rare discrimination and a resourcefulness that hesi- 
tates at no opposing circumstances, pave the way and ultimately lead to worthy 
achievements. It is not the intention of the biographer in this connection to 
give a detailed history of his busy, influential and interesting life, but rather 
to note, incidentally, his connection with various phases of the development 
of this locality, his marked achievement at the bar and his laudable work as a 
jurist, and to show the marked influence he has wielded in advancing the 
general good of Mt. Vernon and vicinity. 

Judge Berry was bom on December 23, 1869, in Howard township, Knox 
county, Ohio, and he is the son of a sterling old pioneer family, John and 
Mary Ann (Critchfield) Berry. The father was born in St. Clairsville, Bel- 
mont county, and the mother in Knox county, Ohio. The elder Berry was a 
successful farmer. He was active in the affairs of his locality and filled 



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556 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

various township offices, being loyal to the principles of the Democratic party. 
He was influential and highly respected by all who knew him, being a man of 
strong characteristics and uprightness. His death occurred in Februar}% 
1903, his widow surviving until in January, 1908. 

The son, Patrick A. Berry, spent his youth on the farm, assisting with 
the general duties about the place and attended the rural schools, later entered 
Bethany College at Bethany, West Virginia, completing his course in 1890. 
He then entered the law department of the University of Michigan, at Ann 
Arbor, Michigan, w^here he made a splendid record and from which he was 
graduated in 1892, when only twenty-three years of age. While in college 
he was a member of the collegiate fraternity. Beta Theta Pi, and the law 
fraternity, Phi Delta Phi. After his graduation he located at Atlanta, 
Georgia, for the practice of his profession and he remained in that city nearly 
five years, enjoying a very liberal practice from the first, but failing health 
compelled him to give up the same. While in Atlanta he was active in the 
aflfairs of the political party with which he affiliated, and he was associated 
with Hon. Hoke Smith and other notables of that section. Upon leaving 
Atlanta he returned to his father's home and assumed the management of the 
farm with a view of regaining his health. In this he was successful and 
again entered the arena of public life. In the fall of 1899 he w^as elected from 
Knox county as a member of the seventy- fourth Ohio General Assembly, in 
which he made such a commendable record that his constituents gladly re- 
elected him to the seventy-fifth General Assembly. During his service of 
two terms he served as a member of various important committees and 
made his influence felt for the good of Knox county and the state in 
general, performing every duty in a manner that reflected much credit upon 
himself and justifying the wisdom of his election. In 1900 he resumed the 
practice of law^ in Mt. Vernon, l^eing associated with Judge Frank O. Lever- 
ing. In the fall of 1905 he was elected probate judge of Knox county and 
re-elected in 1908 by a majority of nineteen hundred and forty-two, the 
largest majority ever given a candidate on the county ticket for any office, 
which is certainly criterion enough of his popularity with the people of this 
locality, and he is now serving his scond Herm as probate judge in an emi- 
nently satisfactory manner. He has kept well abreast of the times in all 
matters pertaining to his profession and is in every way w'ell qualified to dis- 
charge the duties of this important office, his decisions show^ing a clear and 
comprehensive understanding of all phases of jurisprudence and are always 
characterized by fairness and lack of bias. As an attorney he stands in the 
front rank of the Knox county bar, both as counsel and in the trial of cases, 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 557 

and he has always enjoyed a large clientele. From early youth he has been 
active in the aflfairs of the Democratic party and from almost the time of at- 
taining his majority he has been a member of the Democratic county com- 
mittee with the exception of the years when absent from the state. For sev- 
eral years he has ably served in the capacity of chairman of the executive com- 
mittee and he is universally recognized as a most successful campaign mana- 
ger, better known to the voters of the county than any other man in the 
county. 

Fraternally, the Judge belongs to the Masonic order, the Knights of 
Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, in all of which he takes a great deal of interest. 

The domestic life of Judge Berry began on August 17, 1899, when he 
married .Elizabeth Kirk Cameron, daughter of Robert M. and Rachael 
(Mayers) Cameron, the father being a prominent merchant at Millersburg, 
Ohio. Both parents are living. Mrs. Berry was educated in her home city 
and Bethany College and is a lady of culture. This union has been without 
issue. 

Judge Berry and wife are members of the Christian church, in which he 
is a deacon and a member of the Adelphian Class of Loyal Men, a Bible class 
of state-wide significance, for men of all denominations and of large member- 
ship. Both he and his wife are active in church and Sunday school work. 
The family home is at No. 125 East Vine street, where their many friends 
delight to gather. 



FRANKLIN HARPER. 

Examples that impress force of character on all who study them are 
worthy of record. By a few general observations may l)e conveyed some idea 
of the high standing of Franklin Harper, one of the best known newspaper 
men of this section of the Buckeye state. The many elements that are united 
in his makeup, such as persistency, energy, application, integrity and forti- 
tude, during a series of years have brought him into prominence and earned 
for him a conspicuous place in Knox county's list of enterprising men. 

Mr. Harper was born in Mt. Vernon on April 18, 1858, and he is the 
son of Hon. Lecky and Eliza Ann (Mercer) Harper, the father born in 
county Donegal, Ireland, December 29, 181 5, and he came to America with 
his parents, Hugh and Catherine (Long) Harper, in 1820. The father was 
an architect and was employed on government work in Washington, D. C. 



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558 KNOX COUNTY., OHIO. 

In a little more than a year, Hugh Harper contracted malarial fever from the 
swamps that then surrounded Washington, and died. The widow was left 
with four small children, and soon after the death of her husband she under- 
took the trip over the mountains to friends and relatives in the West in the 
locality of Cadiz, Harrison county, Ohio, and there she reared and educated 
her family in a most creditable manner, being a woman of Spartan courage. 
The son, Lecky, father of the subject, as a lad entered a newspaper office at 
Steubenville, Ohio, to learn the printer's trade and the newspaper business, 
which line of work he followed with much success all his life. He also took 
up the law, studying in the office of Metcalf & Loomis in Pittsburg, and in 
1843 he went to Cadiz, where he edited the Cadh Sentinel and practiced law. 
Taking up his residence in Pittsburg, he was one of the founders of the 
Pennsylvauian Advocate and was also connected with the Post of that city, 
one of the early daily papers of the Smoky city. Early in his career he became 
recognized as a writer of great force and for his positive views on public 
questions in general. While connected with the Pittsburg ]}apers he was pro- 
nounced in his support of the ten-hour-a-day law for employes in shops and 
factories. Th«e custom then prevailing in factories was to work all employes, 
including girls and children, from twelve to fdurteen hours. As a result of the 
agitation in which Mr. Harper was foremost, the ten-hour day was estab- 
lished in Pennsylvania. Mr. Harper also did the legislative work at Colum- 
bus for the Ohio Statesman under Samuel Medill. In 1840 he edited the 
Crawford Democrat at Meadville, Pennsylvania, and made the paper a great 
force in that memorable campaign. With a thorough knowledge of the print- 
er's trade, with a knowledge of the law and with his varied newspaper ex- 
perience, he came to Mt. Vernon in 1853 ^'^^ bought the Mt. Vernon Demo- 
cratic Banner, which soon became widely known for its forceful editorials, 
and this paper he successfully conducted until his death, on June 18, 1895. He 
became prominent in the newspaper organization of the state, and for years 
he was president of the Ohio Editorial Association and was also president 
of the Ohio Democratic Editorial Association. His counsel in party matters 
was sought and in all these associations he was recognized as a pillar of 
strength. He also represented the Mt. Vernon district in the Ohio Senate in 
1879 and served effectively upon important committees, winning the hearty 
approval of his constituents and reflecting much credit upon his ability. 

The marriage of Hon. Lecky Harper and Eliza Ann Mercer, the latter 
of Washington county, Pennsylvania, occurred in September, 1844, she 
being the descendant of Gen. Hugh Mercer, of Revolutionary fame. Mrs. 
Harper was a woman of many estimable traits; her death occurred in July. 
1897. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 559 

Frank Harper learned the printing business in his father's office and 
was educated in the Mt. Vernon public schools, being graduated with the 
class of 1877. He read law in the office of Col. W. C. Coopier, of Mt. Vernon, 
and was admitted to the bar in 1879. In 1880 he opened an office for practice 
and was getting a good start in the legal world, when, in 1882, came an op- 
portunity to enter the newspaper business at Chillicothe. He had grown up in 
the business and the taste was inherent, so he went to Chillicothe and became 
a partner of George F. Hunter in the publication of the Chillicothe Advertiser. 
Upon the death of his father, in 1895, he sold his interests in the Chillicothe 
paper and returned to Mt. Vernon in November, 1895, and formed a partner- 
ship with his brother, William M. Harper, in the publication of the Banner, 
which partnership was terminated in June, 1896, by the retirement of the 
latter. The Banner had been published as a semi-weekly until June 20, 1898, 
when Mr. Harper began the publication of a daily and semi-weekly edition, 
which has since been continued, the Banner being universally recognized as 
one of the strongest, brightest and most influential papers in central Ohio. 
Having learned the newspaper business from the ground up, Mr. Turn(er is 
well qualified to successfully manage the same. He is a clear and concise 
writer, and in discerning the various questions of the day is a keen, though 
courteous, antagonist, and his influence has brought him into favorable notice 
with the leaders of his party in this section of the state. In a business sense 
the Banner has brought liberal financial returns upon the capital invested, 
and, as already indicated, has proved a series of successes since the first num- 
ber of the daily appeared as a claimant for public patronage. Its circulation 
is constantly increasing, as an advertising medium its importance is becoming 
generally recognized and its mechanical appearance is all that could be de- 
sired. 

Fraternally, Mr. Harper is a member of the Masonic bodies and is a 
member of the board of trustees of the Masonic Temple Company and was 
president of the company in 1908-9. In politics he is an unswerving Demo- 
crat and is prominent in party councils, but he has never been an office seeker 
or office holder, but he and his paper are always back of party principles and 
candidates and the influence he wields in the cause of Democracy is very 
strong, especially during campaigns. He was a member of the Democratic 
state central and executive committees several times. He was vice-chairman 
of the Democratic state central committee in 1904 and chairman of the same 
body in 1905 and he was delegate from the fourteenth Ohio district to the 
Democratic national convention in 1896. 



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560 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Mr. Harper was married on June 5, 1890, to Bertha Hanby, a lady of 
many estimable qualities of head and heart and the daughter of an excellent 
Chillicothe family. This union has been graced by the birth of two sons, 
Donald and Kenneth; the elder is a student of Kenyon College at Gambier 
and the younger is a student in the Mt. Vernon high school. The subject 
and his family are members of the St. Paul Episcopal church, Mr. Harper 
having been a member of the vestry for a number of years. 



HON. GEORGE D. NEAL. 

The strong, earnest men of a people are always public benefactors. 
Their usefulness in the immediate specific labors they perform can be defined 
by metes and bounds, but the good they do through the forces they put in 
motion and through the inspiration of their presence and example is immeas- 
urably an infinite gauge or standard of value. George D. Neal, one of the 
most conspicuous public and business men of the section of the Buckeye state 
of which this history treats, i^ a man of this type. Although well known and 
highly esteemed, he is conservative and prefers to let his achievements speak 
for him rather than any notice savoring of adulation or fulsome praise of 
the chronicler. Every life, however, if properly known, contains more or less 
of interest, and the public claims a certain property right in the career of 
every citizen, regardless of his achievements or the station he has attained. 
In placing before the reader the brief review which follows, due deference is 
accorded the wishes of Mr. Neal in this respect and we omit too compliment- 
ary allusions, at the same time realizing that the latter have been honorably 
earned and should form no small part of a life sketch which is sought to 
render nothing but what justice and meritorious recognition demand. 

Mr. Neal was born on September 2, 1844, in Mt. Vernon. Ohio, and he 
is the son of Hugh and Ruth (Jackson) Xeal. The Neals came from Wash- 
ington county, Pennsylvania, to this section when Hugh Xeal was a lad, and 
the Jackson family came from Fayette county, Pennsylvania, the daughter, 
Ruth, having been torn on the farm in Mil ford township, Knox county, 
after the family came to Ohio. The father of the subject was engaged in the 
harness business in Mt. Vernon for a number of years, later being elected 
sheriflf of Knox county, which office he held for many years. Politically, he 
\yas a Democrat and was prominent in public aflfairs, being public-spirited. 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 56 1 

and he supported all movements looking to the general good of the public. 
Prior to his term as sheriff he was elected coroner of the county. His death 
occurred in September, 1854, his wife preceding him to the grave by six 
weeks, having died in July the same year. They were the parents of three 
children: Ruth M., who married Liberty L. Cotton, of Mt. Vernon, died in 
December, 1910; George D., of this sketch; and Hugh, a resident of Mt. 
V^emon. Both parents are buried in Mound View cemetery, Mt. Vernon. 

George D. Neal has always lived in Mt. Vernon and he was educated 
in the pubh'c schools here. When a very young man he found employment 
in the wholesale grocery of Jonathan Weaver, of this city, where he re- 
mained for three years, then the Civil war came on and he could not remain 
inactive at his country's call, so early in the struggle he enlisted in the Fourth 
Ohio Volimteer Infantry, as a private in Company A, but being merely a boy 
he only served a short time, returning to his position in Mr. Weaver's store. 
When Gen. Kirby Smith threatened Cincinnati and other Northern cities, Mr. 
Neal again went to the front with the famous '^Squirrel Hunters'' to stop the 
intrepid Southerner's progress, later enlisting in Company B, of the One 
Hundred and Forty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was transferred to 
Company F of the same regiment, in which he served with distinction until 
the same was mustered out at Camp Chase, having taken part in many im- 
portant engagements and proving himself to be a faithful soldier, always pres- 
ent at the call of duty. 

After returning from the army Mr. Neal engaged in the manufacture of 
carriages in Mt. Vernon, which he conducted for a number of years with 
much success. Follow^ing his retirement from the carriage business he de- 
voted his attention to hardware, which he has handled for some time in con- 
nection with his carriage business. In 1887 he purchased the James Rogers 
hardware store, which he conducted with his usual success until 1894, having 
enjoyed a liberal trade with the city and county and always carried a large 
and well selected stock of general hardware and farming implements. 

Mr. Neal has always been a loyal Democrat and has been active and 
influential in party affairs for many years. In 1890 he was elected sergeant- 
at-arms of the sixty-ninth Ohio General Assembly, and in 1893 he was ap- 
pointed doorkeeper of the fifty-second United States Congress at Washing- 
ton. In 1902 he was his party's choice for congressman from the fourteenth 
Ohio district and was accordingly nominated and made a strong and praise- 
worthy race. The district was normally six thousand Republican, but Mr. 
Neal cut that majority down to less than three thousand, which attests his 



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562 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

popularity with the people. He has served as Democratic committeeman and 
adviser and as a delegate to county, district and state conventions, in all of 
which he has made his influence felt for the good of his district and the 
party. After returning from Washington as doorkeeper of the House of 
Representatives, Mr. Neal organized the Mt. Vernon Paint and Oil Com- 
pany, incorporated under the laws of Ohio with a capital of one hundred-^ 
thousand dollars, and he is president and general manager of the company, ^'*- 
the business of which he has conducted in a manner as to reflect much credit 
upon his ability and integrity and to the eminent satisfaction of the stock- 
holders. He is also interested in the gas and oil development of this section 
of Ohio. 

Mr. Neal is a member of the Masonic order, having attained the thirty- 
second degree in that time-honored body, and he is a Knight Templar. He 
is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and he belongs 
to the Joe Hooker Post No. 21, Grand Army of the Republic. He has filled 
most of the offices in this organization and has passed all the chairs in the 
Odd Fellows lodge. 

In the fall of 1869 Mr. Neal was married to Harriet Laughrey, daughter 
of Kinsman and Catherine (DeHart) Laughrey, of Martinsburg, Knox 
county, Ohio. To the subject and wife one daughter has been bom, Catherine 
Ruth, who married David Kinley, dean of the University of Illinois at Cham- 
paign, Illinois, he being a very prominent educator, so recognized by leading 
college men throughout the United States. 

With his various business and public duties, Mr. Neal found time to 
read law in the office of William C. Cooper, of Mt. Vernon, but, although 
well qualified, he has never practiced at the bar. In religious matters he 
affiliates with the Presbyterian church, of which Mrs. Neal is a member. 

At one time Mr. Neal was extensively engaged in the real estate busi- 
ness, operating in various parts of Ohio and acquiring large holdings in 
Mexico. For a number of years he was president of the Knox County Agri- 
cultural Society, being active in promoting better farming conditions. He is 
vice-president of the Ohio Squirrel Hunters, comprising the survivors of the 
noted military organization of that name with which he was connected dur- 
ing the Civil war. The family home, a place noted for its hospitality and 
good cheer, is located at No. 120 East Vine street and is one of the modem, 
commodious and imposing homes of this city and located in one of the most 
desirable residence districts. Personally, Mr. Neal is a well informed, broad- 
minded, progressive, genial and obliging gentleman whom it is a pleasure to 
know. 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 563 

CHARLES A. MITCHELL. 

The old-fashioned notion that hard work, patient industry and far- 
sightedness make for success in the various avenues of life does not seem to 
be accepted so unreservedly in our day. The spread of pessimism engen- 
dered by many phases of our complex life is in a great measure responsible 
for the lack of faith in the old idea. However, if we observe conditions 
closely we will find that the intelligent individual, who leads a practical and 
industrious life, will reach a point of success commensurate with his efforts. 
The life of Charles A. Mitchell, ex-mayor of Mt. Vernon, will afford us an 
instance of this. 

Mr. Mitchell was bom June i, 1868, in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, being the 
representative of one of Knox county's honored old families. He is the son 
of John A. and Malissa (Jackson) Mitchell, who were both born, reared, edu- 
cated, married and spent their entire lives in this community. Sylvester 
Mitchell, the great-grandfather, came to Ohio from Salem, Massachusetts, 
in 1808 and first settled near Granville, Licking county, soon afterwards 
moving to Mil ford township, Knox county, and the land on which he lo- 
cated still remains in the Mitchell family. The old pioneer had made the 
long journey from Massachusetts on horseback, bringing all the earthly 
goods of the family in that manner, in a saddle-bag. Grandfather Albert 
Mitchell was only three years of age at that time. This country was then 
a vast forest through which roamed red men and various kinds of wild game. 
He built a cabin and began clearing the site for the splendid farm which he 
later developed. He was the possessor of many commendable qualities, stood 
for good citizenship and right living and he took a leading part in the affairs 
of his community. John Allen Mitchell, father of the subject, was a stone- 
mason by trade, and he spent all of his active life in Mt. Vernon, w^ith the 
exception of the years spent in the army during the Civil war, having enlisted 
in the Union army in April, 1861, in the Fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 
in response to President Lincoln's call for seventy-five thousand troops. At 
the expiration of his term of service he re-enlisted in Company 
H, Eighty-second Ohio Volunteer Tnfantr\\ in which he served until the 
close of the w^ar. For meritorious service he was promoted to the rank of 
captain of his company. He saw hard service, l>eing continuously in the 
Army of the Potomac. He participated in both the first and second battles 
of Bull Run, Chancellorsville and many others. On the first day of the bat- 
tle of Gettysburg he was taken prisoner and was sent to Libby prison, where 
he had a long term of confinement, remaining there until the spring of 1865, 



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564 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

not being released until after Lee's surrender. Prior to that battle he had also 
seen the inside of Confederate prisons in various parts of the South, having 
been taken prisoner long before the great conflict in Pennsylvania. He had 
many thrilling exf>eriences. tit is described by his comrades as a vaUant 
soldier, always at his post, and he leaves an enviable war record. After his 
career in the army he returned to Mt. Vernon and resumed his trade as brick- 
mason. His death occurred on May 6, 1892. He was a man of positive 
character and strong in his likes and dislikes, and he had many warm friends 
throughout the county. 

Charles A. Mitchell, of this review, has spent practically all his life in 
Mt. Vernon and he was educated in the public schools here. When eighteen 
years of age, in April, 1887, he secured employment as brakeman with the 
Cleveland, Akron & Cohimbus railroad, and he remained with this company 
until August, 1899, g^^'J"S them high grade service, being advanced through 
the diflferent stages until he became a conductor of freight. He suffered from 
a severe attack of rheumatism for several years, at times being compelled to 
use crutches, and one leg being seriously and permanently affected he is still 
compelled to use one crutch. In May, 1903, he entered the office of the audi- 
tor of Knox county as deputy auditor, which position he filled most satis- 
factorily until October, 1906, when he was appointed auditor to fill an un- 
expired term. 

Mr. Mitchell has always been an active Republican in politics and in the 
fall of 1908 he was the party's candidate for county auditor, but, Knox county 
being Democratic, he was defeated. He has always been prominent and 
active in the councils of the party and has been a frequent delegate to county, 
district and state conventions. In November, 1909, he was elected mayor of 
Mt. Vernon and his term expired January i, 1912. His administration 
proved to be most satisfactory to all concerned, irrespective of party align- 
ment, and he is doing much for the permanent good of the vicinity. 

Fraternally, Mr. Mitchell is a member of Mt. Vernon Lodge No. 140, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the Sons of Veterans. 

Mr. Mitchell was married on June 30, 1897, to Lucy Clark, daughter 
of John and Sarah (Johnson) Clark, of Mt. Vernon. This union has been 
w* ithout issue. The family home is at No. 1 1 1 East Front street, which 
property has been the Mitchell home for more than fifty years. Mr. 
Mitchell is fearless and outspoken when he knows he is right, a man of 
positive ideas, integrity and force of character, and as a public servant is 
faithful and conscientious, and is proving to be one of the most popular 
mayors the city of Mt. Vernon has ever had. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 565 

WILLIAM NOAH CARPENTER. 

It is the pride of the citizens of this country that there is no limit to which 
natural ability, industry and honesty may not aspire. A boy born in ignor- 
ance and poverty and reared under the most adverse surroundings may 
nevertheless break from his fetters and rise to the highest station in the land. 
Accordingly it is found that very often in this country the president, gov- 
ernor and other high public officials possess no higher ability than thousands 
of other citizens. They have simply taken better advantage of their circum- 
stances than their fellows. And this truth runs through every occupation. 
The farmer who rises above his fellow farmers does -so by taking advantage 
of conditions which others overlook or fail to grasp. William Noah Car- 
penter, of Pleasant township, Knox county, and his progenitors have al- 
ways identified themselves, for the most part, with agricultural pursuits, and 
they have been very successful in this line of endeavor. 

Mr. Carpenter was born on August 5, 1876, on a farm in Clay town- 
ship. Knox county, Ohio. He is the son of Thomas H. and Martha (Dudg- 
eon) Carpenter, the mother a native of this county and the father of Greene 
county, Pennsylvania. Grandfather Charles Carpenter came with his family 
to Clay township from Pennsylvania in 1850 and here engaged in farming. 
His son, Thomas H., father of the subject, devoted his life to farming. In 
1880 he left Clay township and became a resident of Pleasant township, 
owning a farm six miles south of Mt. Vernon, and there he engaged in gen- 
eral farming and stock raising, having one of the choice farms in that com- 
munity. He made a specialty of handling sheep. Politically, he was a Dem- 
ocrat, but he was never an office seeker. His death occurred on August 13, 
1890. His widow still survives. They w^ere the parents of two sons and 
a daughter, namely: William Noah, of this review; James Austin, born 
May 18, 1878, is farming in Wayne township, Knox county; Jannetta R., 
who married Edward P. Warman, lives in Mt. Vernon. 

William N. Carpenter spent his youth on the home farm and was edu- 
cated in the district schools. He l)egan carpentering when about twenty-two 
years of age and this has l)een his principal life work ever since, though he 
has engaged a great deal in farming. He is a very skilled workman and 
his services have always been in great demand. He does a great deal of 
contracting, and has built many of the substantial buildings over the county, 
having won a reputation for reliability and thoroughness. He supervises 
his mother's farm and is thus a very busy man in his various lines of 
endeavor. 



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566 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

Mr. Carpenter was married on March 16, 1898, to Clara J. Warman, 
daughter of Alfred and Matilda (McKibben) Warman, farmers of Pleas- 
ant township, where Mrs. Carpenter was bom, reared and educated and 
where she has always lived. Her father was bom in England, from which 
country he emigrated to America when twelve years of age, in 1850, and 
settled in Pleasant township, this county, though he remained in Mt. Vernon 
a short time before moving to the farm. The mother of Mrs. Carpenter 
died in January, 1904. Six children have been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Car- 
penter, two sons and four daughters, namely : Edith P., Robert Carl, Agones 
G., Martha M., Ada L. and Charles T. 

Politically, Mr. Carpenter is independent and, while he always exer- 
cises the right of citizenship at the polls and in advancing such measures as 
make for the good of his community and county, he has never been an office 
seeker, though he has served as township trustee since November, 1909. 
He is a member of Pleasant Grange No. 677, Patrons of Husbandry, and 
has been active in the same for some time. He and his wife belong to the 
Hopewell Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is one of the trustees, 
and he was formerly superintendent of the Sunday school there and teacher 
in the same. He is at present superintendent of the Mt. Pleasant Presby- 
terian church Sunday school, and is very active in church and Sunday school 
work. 



REV. ALBERT B. WILLIAMS. 

Most men have numerous friends, but generally men are so constituted 
and environed that they also make some enemies, but one of the exceptions 
to this general rule was he for whom the following memoir is written — the 
late, lamented Elder Albert B. Williams, of the Christian church. Indeed, 
his was a noble manhood, made almost perfect by the Christian religion that 
he had professed and practiced since a lad of twelve summers. 

The subject was a native of Holmes county, Ohio, born April 4, 1847, 
and passed from earth's shining circle on the afternoon of Friday, September 
8, 191 1, just as the autumn leaves were beginning to put on their tints of 
yellow and all nature seemed at rest. From these dates it will be observed 
that Mr. Williams was in his sixty-fifth year at the time of his death. He 
was one of a family of nine children born to Stephen R. and Jane (Hague) 
Williams, both of Holmes county, Ohio. Three brothers passed on before 
him, but the father, aged ninety-five, the saintly mother, ninety years of age, 



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REV. ALBERT B. WILLIAMS 



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^'^HeI^BW YORK I 

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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 567 

with three sisters, Mrs. Nancy Everhard, of Wooster, Ohio; Mrs. Mary 
Burkett, of Bethany, Nebraska; Mrs. J. T. H. Steward, of Kilbuck, Ohio, 
two brothers, M. V. Williams, of Winfield, Kansas, and Olus C. Williams, 
of Wooster, Ohio, and his own immediate family all survive him. 

At the age of twelve years Albert B. Williams was converted to the 
Christian religion and united with the Disciples or Church of Christ, which 
church he lived to adorn and honor throughout a useful ministry. In 1875 
he graduated from Bethany College, West Virginia, and was soon ordained 
to preach, becoming pastor of the church at Wadsworth, Ohio. In 1893 he 
became pastor of the Church of Christ at Mt. Vernon, Ohio, serving until 
April, 1900, when on account of failing health he was compelled to resign. 
Ehiring those seven years of faithful work as pastor of this church, known 
as the Vine Street church, he accomplished much good as a true-hearted 
worker in his Master's vineyard. He was a practical man — a practical church 
worker. He ever sought to make men better and, by his daily walk and con- 
versation, set an example worthy of emulation. During that period Elder 
Williams added two hundred and eighty persons to this church, besides one 
hundred and thirty to outside churches in Knox county. He also paid off a 
heavy indebtedness for the church, and united fifty-three couples in marriage; 
also attended sixty funerals of which he had charge and preached the ser- 
mons for. During the last ten years of his life he preached for various 
churches, within Knox county mostly. He was also interested in a local 
insurance agency, having his office in Mt. Vernon and which was occupying 
his attention when he was taken ill for the last time. 

Mr. Williams was twice married. First, on December 26, 1876, he was 
united to Sarah Margaret Harper, a teacher in the public schools of Millers- 
burg, Ohio, who preceded him to their future home May 12, 1890. On 
August 4, 1892, he w^s married to his second companion, Camilla Marsh. 
To Mr. Williams were born three children : Ila B. Williarns, now a teacher in 
'the public schools in Mt. Vernon, Ohio; Olus V. Williams and Mrs. W. P. 
Whittington. 

Mr. Williams died at his residence on McKinz.ie street, and his funeral 
was held at the Church of Christ, the following Sabbath. The services were 
conducted by the pastor. Doctor Francis, assisted by Rev. W. E. Hull of the 
Episcopal church. The large assemblage of people and the remarks made by 
the ministers all bespoke the greatness of the deceased as a faithful Christian 
worker, as a true citizen and as a loving father and husband. His death 
was mourned throughout the -entire county, and more than once has the 
writer of this notice heard the remark, "Elder Williams had no enemies.'' 



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568 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

Universally respected, his work finished, the summons carne to enter a 
higher sphere and his remains are now at rest in beautiful Mound View 
cemetery in Mt. Vernon. Of such pure, even tempered lives the w^orld has 
none too many to point to as examples. 



JOHN L. McKINLEY. 

The name McKinley is destined to occupy an honored place in Amer- 
ican histor}^ as long as time endures, in view of the fact that it has been 
emblazoned on the scroll of fame by the great martyred statesman and late 
beloved President. It will remain forever a monument of the grand possi- 
bilities which may be realized under the benign influence of our free institu- 
tions and will continue in the future, as it has been in the past, a stimulus 
to noble deeds and greater activities on the part of a yocng man of intelli- 
gence and energy upon whom fortune casts no benignant smiles. John L. 
McKinley, of this review, is not famed as a leader of men or the molder of 
public thought, as was the great man referred to above, but he is nevertheless 
a man of more than ordinar>- mettle and has performed his duty well in 
his sphere of action during a long, varied and most interesting career, and 
his life may be just as useful and worthy of reward as a result of duty well 
and conscientiously performed in the arena in which fate placed him as that 
of the most renowned name of which his generation can boast, for a man's 
worth lies, after all, in being true to one's self, honorable in his relations wMth 
his fellow men and loyal in his support of public institutions; this, in brief, 
is a summary of the admirable attributes of the gentleman to whom the fol- 
lowing paragraphs are addressed. 

Mr. McKinley was born on February 25, 1848, in Illinois. He is the 
son of John J. and Elizabeth (Atkins) McKinley, the father bom in Pennsyl- 
vania and the mother in Kentucky. They both went to Illinois when young 
people and were married there and made that state their home until the break- 
ing out of the Civil war, when the father enlisted in the Federal army. After 
the war he moved to Missouri, and later to Kansas. He devoted his life to 
farming and his death occurred on October 24, 1886, at his home in Cass 
county. Missouri. Mrs. Elizabeth McKinley, mother of the subject, is still 
living, making her home in Kansas City. 

John L. McKinley, of this sketch, lived on the home farm until he was 
sixteen years of age, and he attended the country district schools in Illinois. 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 569 

On October i, 1863, he enlisted in Company E, Seventeenth Regiment Illi- 
nois Cavalry, and served very faithfully until November 14, 1865, in the 
Army of the Cumberland and the western army. He saw much active and 
hard service and participated in many hotly contested engagements. He was 
slightly wounded once when a picket courier near Centralia, Missouri, After 
the war he returned to Galena, Illinois, where he remained until March, 1866, 
then went to Iowa, thence to the Indian Territory and he drove a stage from 
Ottawa, Franklin county, Kansas, to Humbolt, Allen county, that state, on 
the old Santa Fe stage route. At the advent of the railroad the stage was 
discontinued and Mr. McKinley went to Baxter Springs, Kansas, and en- 
gaged to drive cattle, and he was a Kansas and Texas *'cow boy" until 1872, 
later engaged in various occupations. He finally went to Independence, 
Kansas, where, on August 13, 1873, he was married to Barbara Workman, 
daughter of Amos and Lydia (DeWitt) Workman, a Knox county (Ohio) 
family, of near the town of Danville, where the parents lived and died, the 
daughter, wife of the subject, having gone to the Sunflower state on a visit 
when she met Mr. McKinley. To this union one child has beeri bom, Clin- 
ton, who is married and is living in Liberty township. They also have an 
adopted daughter, Maude Wade McKinley. 

After his marriage, Mr. McKinley lived in Independence, Kansas, 
variously employed. He operated the first steam threshing machine ever 
seen in Montgomery county, Kansas. In the fall of 1876 he came to Dan- 
ville, Knox county, Ohio, and here engaged in farming until the spring of 
1889 when he was appointed superintendent of the Knox county infirmary, 
in which capacity he served with much credit to himself and to the satisfac- 
tion of all concerned until in February, 1909, a service of twenty years, which 
is certainly not only evidence of his fitness, but of his popularity in this 
county and a criterion of the confidence reposed in him by the people. He 
was at all times a competent and faithful public servant. Politically, he is 
a Republican and he has l)een active in party affairs. He served as a meml)er 
of the Republican county central committee for four years and he has been 
a frequent delegate to county, district and state conventions where he has al- 
ways made his influence felt. He was a trustee of Howard township for 
four years prior to his connection with the infirmary. Fraternally, he be- 
longs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He also belongs to the 
Joe Hooker Post, Grand Army of the Republic, and Danville Lodge No. 546, 
Free and Accepted Masons. He and his wife are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. They have a delightful countr>' home just west of the 
village of Bangs, where genial hospitality is extended to their many friends. 



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570 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

He has a fine farm of seventy-six acres in fertile Dry Creek valley, and is 
well fixed in every respect. He is a man of broad views and thorough un- 
derstanding of modem agricultural methods which he employed on the county 
farm with such pronounced success. He is a fine example of a self-educated, 
self-made man, and is deserving of much credit for what he has accomplished 
and the worthy, public-spirited citizen into which he has developed. 



CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS CLEMENTS. 

Human life is made up of two elements, power and form, and the pro- 
portion must be invariably kept if we would have it sweet and sound. Each 
of these elements in excess makes a mischief as hurtful as would be its de- 
ficiency. Everything turns to excess; every good quality is noxious if un- 
mixed, and to carry the danger to the edge of ruin nature causes each man's 
peculiarity to superabound. One speaking from the standpoint of a farmer 
would adduce the learned professions as examples of this teaching. They 
are nature's victims of expression. You study the artist, orator, poet or 
statesman and find their lives no more excellent than that of mechanics or 
fanners. While the farmer stands at the head of art as found in nature, 
the others get but glimpses of the delights of nature in its various elements 
and moods. A man who is in touch with the springs of life, who takes a 
delight in existence and is able to get the most out of his close association 
with Mother Nature is Christopher Columbus Clements, one of Monroe 
township's honored farmers and one of the venerable native sons of Knox 
county, his birth having occurred near Bangs in Liberty township seventy- 
one years ago on a farm. He is the son of Hezekiah and Serepta (Daley) 
Clements, both natives of Loudoun county, Virginia, from which they came 
to Knox county, Ohio, as young people. They were married here about 
1843 ^"^ established themselves on a farm in Liberty township. Later, 
selling their farm there, they bought land in Monroe township, four miles 
northeast of Mt. Vernon, and there the father spent the remainder of his 
life. He was a farmer and a man of prominence in his community. The 
mother of the subject died when he was two years old, he being the youngest 
of six children, namely : William, George, Elizabeth, Lorenzo D., John W., 
and the subject. The only two now living are Lorenzo D. and Christopher 
C. The father, Hezekiah Clements, was a Democrat, but never an office 
seeker. He was sixty-five years of age when he died. 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 571 

Christopher C. Clements was reared on the home farm and there he 
worked hard when a boy. He received such education as the county provided 
in the old log school-houses. He remained at home until he was married, 
on July 7, 1864, to Margaret Popham, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth 
(Scowles) Popham. the father a prominent farmer and sheep raiser of this 
county. 

To the subject and wife five children were born, namely: Oliver B. is 
farming in Monroe township; Charles H. is at home; Alberta B. married 
Frank Showers, of Fredericktown ; and Luella, who married Earl McDer- 
mott, a farmer of Monroe township; one child died in infancy. 

After his marriage Mr. Clements lived in Amity, this county, where he 
worked at his trade, blacksmithing, for a period of twenty-eight years, dur- 
ing which time he did a large business, being regarded as one of the most 
skilled and successful workmen in the county. Then he purchased a farm 
of one hundred acres on the Wooster road, four miles northeast of Mt. 
Vernon, and here he has since resided, engaged successfully in general farm- 
ing and stock raising. He has a commodious and comfortable home and good 
outbuildings, and his farm is well kept in every respect. 

The wife of the subject was called to her rest on September 26, 1892, 
and is buried in the cemetery at Ebenezer church, adjoining the farm of Mr. 
Qements. 

Politically, the subject is a Democrat, but has never been an office 
seeker and has never held office He keeps well informed on public ques- 
tions and tries to exercise the right of suffrage conscientiously and intelli- 
gently. 



CASSIE BREECE. 



One of the men who has stamped the impress of his strong individuality 
upon the minds of the people of Pleasant township and who has been con- 
tent to spend his life in Knox county is Cassie Breece. Faithfulness to duty 
and a strict adherence to a fixed purpose, which always do more to advance 
a man's interest than wealth or advantageous circumstances, have been dom- 
inating factors in his life, which has been replete with honor and success 
worthily attained. 

Mr. Breece was born on January 28, 1868, on a farm in Harrison town- 
ship, this county. He is the son of Adam G. and Elizabeth (Biggs) Breece. 
the father born in Loudoun county, Virginia, on May 29, 1832, and he died 



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572 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

on May 20, 1904; the mother of the subject is still living. Adam G. Breece 
was four years old when, in 1836, his parents brought him to Ohio and here 
he was reared on a farm and he made farming his life occupation. He came 
to Knox county in 1855 and bought a farm in Harrison township and here 
he and Elizabeth Biggs were married in 1859, and made their home in 
Harrison township; however, the following year, i860, they purchased a 
farm in Pleasant township, where the elder Breece remained until his death, 
having become very well established and developing a good farm, becoming 
in fact, a large land owner and an influential citizen. He raised stock ex- 
tensively and fed large numbers from year to year. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Adam G. Breece seven children were born, namely: 
Rosetta died on July 5, 1887; Almeda, who died August 9, 1911, married 
S. W. Henry, of Clay township; Joseph S. lives in Pleasant township; Levi 
Newton lives in Pleasant township; Cassie, of this sketch; Leora E. died 
June 6, 1897; Leander lives in Pleasant township. 

Politically, the father of these children was a Democrat and he was al- 
ways interested in public matters, but was never an office seeker, lit was 
a member of the Universalist church. He was buried in the cemetery at 
Union Grove church, Harrison township. 

Cassie Breece, of this sketch, spent his childhood and youth on the 
home farm where he now lives and he attended the Graham district schools. 
He began working on the farm as soon as he was old enough. He has kept 
the old place well cultivated so that it has retained its original fertility and 
modem improvements may be seen on it today as a result of his industry 
and close application. 

Mr. Breece was married on February 22, 1890, to Fanny Ashbum, 
daughter of William and Eliza (Louderbaugh) Ashburn, who live on a farm 
in Harrison township. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Breece, named as follows: Charles H., born September 27, 1891; Harry L., 
born June 11, 1894; and Ethel May, bom August 20, 1902. Both sons are 
students in the Mt. Vernon high school at this writing and they are making 
a splendid record there. 

After his marriage, Mr. Breece located on one of his father's farms five 
miles southeast of Mt. Vernon and there he remained until in October, 1906, 
when he moved to the old home farm one mile farther south, where he has 
since resided, and here he has been carrying on general farming in a manner 
not surpassed in skill by any of his neighbors. He has one hundred and 
twenty acres of fertile, well-improved and well-cultivated land on which is 
a never-failing spring, which furnishes abundant water to all parts of the 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 573 

farm the year round. Much of his attention is directed to raising sheep, 
cattle, hogs and fine draft horses. He has a commodious home and sub- 
stantial outbuildings. 

Pohtically, Mr. Breece is a Democrat and is always active in political 
affairs. He has been a member of the Democratic county committee and 
judge of elections, and he has been a frequent delegate to county and district 
conventions. He has been school director of his district. He has never 
sought office or wanted it, but he has frequently been urged to accept various 
positions of trust within the gift of the people. He keeps well informed 
on all matters pertaining to general farming and stock raising and he carries 
out modem methods in all phases of his work with the result that he gets 
the largest returns from the minimum amount of labor and expense. 



JAMES A. SIMPSON. 

The gentleman whose name heads this review is one of the leading 
farmers in his community in Knox county, and this volume would be in- 
complete were there failure to make mention of him and the enterprise with 
which he has conducted his affairs, bringing to successful issue whatever he 
has turned his attention to through a life of successful endeavor along agri- 
cultural lines. Tireless energy and honesty of purpose are the chief charac- 
teristics of the man, and he stands today as one of the representative citi- 
zens of Clay township. 

Mr. Simpson was bom January 14, 1850, in Washington county, Penn- 
sylvania, and is the son of Isaac A. and Mary Jane (Agnew) Simpson. In 
the spring of 185 1 the family left Pennsylvania and came to Rumley town- 
ship, Harrison county, near Jewett, Ohio, and in 1863 came to Clay town- 
ship, Knox county, Ohio, locating on a farm one and one-half miles north 
of Martinsburg. Here Isaac Simpson prospered, becoming one of the sub- 
stantial farmers, stock buyers and shippers of the community, and one of 
the influential men there. Politically, he was a Republican, and for some 
time he served as trustee and assessor of Clay township. He took a lively 
interest in public matters all his mature life. He was a man of fine charac- 
ter and enjoyed the good will of his neighbors and friends, who reposed in 
him explicit confidence, his word being as good as his bond. The death of 
Isaac Simpson occurred on January 12, 1889, his wife having preceded him 
to the grave many years, her death occurring in the spring of 1854. Mr. 



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574 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Simpson was twice married, his last wife, Nancy A. King, being a native of 
Harrison county, Ohio, whom he married in 1855, and her death occurred 
on August 8, 191 1. By his first marriage four children were born, namely: 
Josiah G. died April 20, 1879; Violet J. died September 7, 1895; James A., 
of this review ; Mary O. married Peter W. Grieflf, of Clay township. By the 
second marriage three children were born, namely: William H. died when 
three years old, in 1857; Alexander C, of Newark, Ohio; Samuel S. lives 
on the home farm with the subject of this sketch. 

James A. Simpson grew up on the home farm and there early in his 
boyhood became acquainted with the general work about the place. He re- 
ceived his education in the country district schools. 

On August 21, 1883, Samuel S. Simpson married Sarah E. Parrish, 
daughter of Henry and Nancy (Kidd) Parrish, of Clay township, the father 
being now deceased. To this marriage four children have been born, named 
as follows: Harry A. lives in Clay township; Estella J. is now the wife of 
Sherman Wooloson, of College township; Armeda P. is at home; James W. 
is assisting in the management of the home farm. 

James A. Simpson has always been a farmer, and he has kept abreast 
of the twentieth-century methods of tilling the soil, ever ready to adopt the 
best and spare no pains in making his one of the choice fanns of the county. 
It consists of two hundred and twenty acres of fertile, well improved and 
well cultivated land, and as a general farmer and stock raiser he is not sur- 
passed by any of his neighbors. He raises well bred live stock. 

Politically, Mr. Simpson is a Republican. He has served the people as 
township trustee and as a member of the school board. In his church life he 
belongs to the Presbyterian church and is a trustee in the same and a liberal 
supporter of the local congregation. He supports all measures looking to 
the general improvement in his community, and he is highly regarded by 
all who know him. Mr. Simpson is not married. 



FRANK B. ZEIG. 



The twentieth century being essentially utilitarian as distinguished from 
other epochs, the life of every successful individual carries a lesson which, 
told in contemporary narrative, is productive of much good in shaping the 
destinies of others. There is, therefore, a due measure of satisfaction in 
presenting, even in brief resume, the life and achievements of such men, and in 



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KNQX COUNTY^ OHIO. 575 

preparing the following history of sdch a progressive young business man of 
Fredericktown, Knox county, whose name appears above, it is with the hope 
that it will prove an incentive to others who hesitate at the parting of the 
ways, for it shows that energy, right principles and close application to one's 
chosen vocation will accomplish definite results even in the face of seeming 
discouragements of large magnitude. ' 

Frank B. Zeig, who is known in various parts of the world as a manu- 
facturer of road graders, was born on March 31, 1879, in Marion, Ohio, and 
he is the son of Christian and Margaret (Knickle) Zeig, the father a native 
of Ohio and the mother of Pennsylvania. The elder Zeig is an extensive 
live stock dealer in Marion county, this state. 

The son, Frank B., grew to maturity in Marion county and attended the 
common schools of Marion. He began his business career when but a young 
man, by dealing in timber and lumber, operating in Marion county, and for 
a time engaged in the hoop business somewhat extensively, operating a mill 
of his own, and, in fact, manufactured all kinds of lumber. In 1903 he 
came to Fredericktown and established a saw mill here in which he manu- 
factured many varieties of lumber, becoming widely known as a lumber- 
man, until 1907, when he disposed of his saw mill and engaged in the foundry 
business, building a new plant which has grown under his able and judicious 
management to large proportions. Here are manufactured road graders and 
road drags of four different styles, also cast iron culvert pipes and hardware 
specialties. The products of this excellent plant are sold by traveling sales- 
men all over this country and a large export trade is carried on, mostly with 
Africa, South America and Australia. The grading machines and culvert 
pipes have met with a ready market wherever offered, being of a superior 
design, quality and workmanship. His foundry is itiodem in its equipment, 
well arranged, everything under a superb system and only skilled artisans are 
employed. Mr. Zeig gives it his careful attention, every detail being care- 
fully considered, no stone being left unturned whereby any of his products 
may be made better, more serviceable or desirable. He has proven himself 
to be a man of rare executive and mechanical ability, of keen discernment and 
foresight. Besides his foundry he has other business interests. He works 
about sixty men in his foundries. 

On November 27, 1902, Mr. Zeig was united in marriage with Elizabeth 
Borth, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Borth, of Marion county, one of the 
highly respected and influential families of that loc.ality. The union of Mr. 
and Mrs. Zeig has been graced by the birth of two children, a son and a 
daughter, Harold and Stella. 



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576 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Politically, Mr. Zeig is a RepuWican, but he has never found time from 
his business interests to take an active part in politics; however, he may al- 
ways be depended upon to lend his support to all movements having for their 
object the betterment of local conditions. He has served as a member of the 
town council. Fraternally, he is a Mason, belonging to the chapter and com- 
mandery at Mt. Vernon. 

Personally, Mr. Zeig is a gentleman of fine attributes of head and heart, 
sociable, genial and obliging, entirely honorable in all his relations with his 
fellow men, consequently enjoys their good will and esteem. He is of the 
quality that counts for progress in any community. 



HENRY A. ALLEN. 



Henry A. Allen was bom on April 30, 1855, on the farm, one mile 
southwest of Mt. Vernon, where he has always lived. He is the son of 
Asahel and Content (Wing) Allen, the father bom in Blast Bridgewater, 
Massachusetts, November 18, 1803. Soon after his birth the family moved 
to Benson, Vemiont, and in the fall of 1833 they came to Knox county. Ohio, 
and lived a year in Mt. Vernon, then purchased the fami where the subject 
of this sketch was lx)rn and which has ever since remained in possession of 
the family and on which the father spent the remaining years of his life, hav- 
ing become very well established and a highly esteemed citizen. His death 
occurred on April 13, 1887. His wife was born in Glens Falls, New York, 
November 10, 1812. The Wing family came to Knox county in 1817 when 
this country was heavily timbered and sparsely settled. The death of Mrs. 
Allen occurred on December 29, 1898. They are both buried in Mound View 
cemetery, Mt. Vernon. To these parents five children were born, one dying 
in infancy; the four that grew to maturity were: Belinda E., who married 
John B. Steinmetz, of Clinton township; Alice A. is single and lives with the 
subject of this sketch; Charles R. is also living with Mr. Allen of this review. 

Henry A. Allen has spent his entire life on the home farm, as above indi- 
cated, and he was educated in the country district schools. He was married 
on December 19, 1900, to Clara B. Myers, daughter of Harry and Mehnda 
(Shinnaberry) Myers; the father is still living, the mother having died in 
1904. The union of the subject and wife has been without issue. 

Mr. Allen has kept the home place of one hundred and sixty-three acres 
well improved and well cultivated, so that he has kept the land strong and 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 577 

productive, and his crops from year to year bounteously attest to his skill as 
a husbandman. In connection with general farming he carries on stock rais- 
ing. His sister, Alice A., is one-fourth owner of the home place. He has 
in addition to that, one hundred acres in a nearby neighborhood. 

Politically, Mr. Allen is a Republican, but he has never l)een an office- 
seeker, but always interested in public affairs and a voter for the best men 
and measures. He is an advocate of public improvements, good roads, better 
schools and public buildings, in short, everything that added to the beauty 
and benefit of the community. The Allen family has long been conspicuous 
in the social life of the community, and all its members from the early pio- 
neer times have borne good reputations. The grandfather, Asahel Allen, 
who came here with his family in 1833, built on his farm one of the first 
brick dwellings in this section of the state, at present used as a tenant house, 
and here he resided until his death, on April 22, 1850. His wife, who was 
known in her maidenhood as Rhoda Tillson, died on December i, 1857. The 
elder Allen possessed a strong and vigorous intellect and his advice and 
opinion were frequently sought in all matters pertaining to the welfare of the 
community. The residence of the family at the present time is in the com- 
modious frame structure erected by Asahel Allen, Jr., in 1843. 



WILSON WORKMAN BUTLER. 

In examining the life records of self-made men it will inevitably be 
found that indefatigable industry has constituted the basis of their success. 
True there are other elements which enter in and conserve the advancement 
of personal interests, — perseverance, discrimination and mastering of expe- 
dients, — ^but the foundation of all achievements is earnest, persistent labor. 
One of Knox county's citizens, Wilson Workman Butler, realized at the 
outset of his career that there was no real road to success and that to reach 
the goal of prosperity and independence one must not permit obstacles to 
thwart an earnest resolve, consequently he began to work earnestly and dili- 
gently to advance himself, and the result is that he is one of the wide-awake, 
enterprising men of the times, fully alive to the dignities and responsibilities 
of citizenship, and is peer of any of his contemi)oraries in the business world, 
all through his individual effort. Courteous, genial, companionable and un- 
assuming, he commands the respect of all with whom he comes into contact, 
and his friends are as the number of his acquaintances. He is universally 



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578 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

esteemed in all the relations of life, and his career has been creditable to him- 
self and an honor to the locality of which this history treats where most of 
his life has been spent. He is a worthy representative of one of our sterling 
pioneer families, the escutcheon of whose honored name he has been careful 
to keep untarnished. 

Mr. Butler was born on the old homestead two miles east of Danville, 
Union township, Knox county, Ohio, on December 9, 1862. He is the son 
of Squire John and Mary Jane (Workman) Butler, the father born on 
August 12, 1820, and he died at Oberlin, Ohio, on December 22, 1897. The 
mother was bom February 9, 1824, and her death occurred on March 19, 
1870. Their family consisted of one son and two daughters: Wilson W., of 
this review ; Florence, who died when two years of age ; and Ida Josephine, 
who married John R. Payne, of Danville, Ohio; her death occurred about 
eight years ago. 

Wilson W. Butler, of this sketch, was reared on the home farm and 
when old enough he assisted with the general work about the place and at- 
tended the district schools until he was twelve years of age, then moved to 
Danville to reside with his sister, Mrs. Payne, and there attended what was 
called a select school, conducted by teachers who had only a class of selected 
pupils. He subsequently attended a business college in Danville for one term. 
This was all the schooling he was permitted to obtain : however, always re- 
maining a student and being a keen observer, he has made up for this early 
lack by miscellaneous home study and by actual contact with the business 
world. 

When sixteen years old Mr. Butler accepted a position in a general 
merchandise store at OHve Green (Kingston Center), Delaware county, 
Ohio, and remained there for ten months, then secured employment in Z. L. 
White's dry goods store at the town of Delaware, Ohio, where he remained 
eighteen months ; he then went with the John Shillito Dry Goods Company, of 
Cincinnati, where he remained for approximately a period of three years. 
He had by this time mastered the ins and outs of the mercantile business, 
performing his duties in a manner that reflected much credit upon himself 
and to the entire satisfaction of his employers. He then engaged with his 
brother-in-law, J. R. Payne, also J. M. Clifton and E. V. Wells, in the gran- 
ite business at Lima, this state. After spending approximately five years in 
the granite business, in which he met with a large measure of success, he 
went to Xew York and accepted a position as secretary of the Westerly 
Granite Company there, remaining with them about a year, after which we 
find him in the employ of the Sterlingworth Railway Supply Company, of 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 579 

Easton, Pennsylvania, and he went to Chicago, as their western manager, 
the duties of which position he filled creditably and acceptably for a year and 
a half, then went to the American Car & Foundry Company, representing 
this firm in Chicago as their western sales agent for about eighteen months. 
He then purchased an interest and accepted a position as second vice-president 
of the Simplex Railway Appliance Company, of Hammond, Indiana. He 
went to New York city soon afterwards to take charge of their eastern busi- 
ness. He remained with this firm for about four years, when the business of 
the company was sold to the American Steel Foundries, of which company 
he was elected second vice-president, and remained with this concern in New 
York for about seven years. For the past two years he has been located in 
Montreal, Canada, as first vice-president of the Canadian Car & Foundry 
Company, Limited, and the Canadian Steel Foundries, Limited, and he still 
spends the major part of his time in that city. 

He has been very successful in a business way and has long been re- 
garded as an expert in the line of endeavor to which his present energies are 
devoted, having a national reputation in the business world. 

Mr. Butler owns the old home place where he was born in Knox county 
and this he is placing under a high state of modern improvement and cultiva- 
tion, fitting it up as a gentleman's country residence, where he intends spend- 
ing considerable time in the future years, as his business aflfairs will permit. 
He takes a great pride in this picturesque old home and when his present 
plans of improvement are carried out this will be one of the "show places" 
of the county and a most desirable rural estate, equipped with modern, com- 
modious and attractive buildings and well stocked. 

Mr. Butler's daughter, Gladys, a young lady of many estimable attri- 
butes, was married on June lo, 1910, to Hurlbert C. Phillips, of Carthage, 
Ohio, and to this union a daughter was born on September 18, 191 1. 

Mr. Butler is a specimen of well rounded, symmetrically developed, 
virile manhood, moving among his fellow^s as one born to leadership, and he 
has directed his life along lines which could not fail to affect favorably the 
physical as well as the mental man, having from his youth advocated whole- 
some living and right thinking. With duties that would crush the ordinar}^ 
man, he has his affairs so systematized that he experiences little or no incon- 
venience in disposing of his routine work and in carrying to successful 
issue large and important undertakings. He is a vigorous and independent 
thinker, a wide reader, and he has the courage of his convictions upon all 
subjects which he investigates. He is essentially cosmopolitan in his ideas, 
and in the best sense of the word a representative type of that strong American 



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580 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

manhood, which commands and retains respect by reason of inherent merit, 
sound sense and correct conduct. Measured by the accepted standard of ex- 
cellence, his career, though strenuous, has been eminently honorable and use- 
ful, and his life fraught with great good to those with whom he has come in 
contact and to the world. 



ISAAC S. HARMER. 



The gentleman to whom the reader's attention is directed in this review. 
Isaac S. Harmer, has attained prestige by reason of native and acquired abil- 
ity in agricultural circles and high standing in the domain of private citizen- 
ship. He is one of the representative men of Hilliar township, Knox county. 
He takes a deep and abiding interest in everything pertaining to the material 
advancement of his township and everything intended to promote the ad- 
vancement of this locality is sure to receive his hearty support. He is rated 
as one of the progressive citizens of his community and the high respect in 
which he is held by all classes of people is a deserving compliment to an in- 
telligent, broad-minded and most worthy man of affairs. 

Mr. Harmer was born on July 27, 1855, in Summersville, Somerset 
county, New Jersey. He is the son of John L. and Mary E. (Brokow) Har- 
mer. The parents came to Ohio with their family in 1859 and settled on a 
farm in Morrow county. After successfully engaging in farming for some 
time the father finally moved to Centerburg, where he was engaged in the 
meat business. His death occurred on June 15, 1903. His widow still lives 
in Centerburg. 

Isaac S. Harmer spent most of his youth on the home farm assisting 
his father with the general work about the place and he received his educa- 
tion in the country district schools, and after the family moved to Center- 
burg he attended the public schools here. He was married on October 11, 
1883, to Joanna Murphey, daughter of William and Julia A. (Smith) 
Murphey, the father being a substantial and well known farmer of Hilliar 
township. The mother, a widow, now eighty-seven years of age, and her 
daughter, Mrs. Harmer, are the only survivors of the Murphey family. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Harmer three daughters have been bom, namely: Marie, 
Mabel and the oldest, who died in infancy. 

Mr. Harmer began his married life on the home fami of the Murpheys, 
he having purchased all the interests of the heirs, and here he has since re- 
sided, having brought the place up to a high state of improvement and culti- 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 58 1 

vation and managing it with such skill as to render it one of the choice fanns 
of the township, and here he has been very successful as a general fanner 
and stock raiser. This excellent place is located one mile west of Centerburg. 
Mr. Harmer has made a specialty of thoroughbred Delaine sheep. He has 
been very successful in a business way and besides his farming interests he 
is a director and stockholder in the First National Bank of Centerburg. 

Politically, Mr. Harmer is a Republican and is active in public affairs. 
He served eight years as township tnistee and he was land appraiser for 
Hilliar township in 19 lo. He has been a frequent delegate to party con- 
ventions. He has frequently been urged to become a candidate for county 
offices, but has always declined. He favors public improvements, good roads, 
better schools and public buildings. He and his family are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church and he has been a trustee of the church for fully 
twenty years, and has long been active in church and Sunday school work. 
He is a man of high character and standing, a genial, broad-minded, charit- 
able gentleman whom it is a pleasure to know, and he and his family are held 
in high esteem by a wide circle of friends and acquaintances. 



JOHN R. CLAYPOOL, M. D. 

While yet young in years. Dr. John R. Claypool, of Gambier, Knox 
county, has shown what may be accomplished by the youth who diligently 
and conscientiously tries to advance himself, whose ideals are high and whose 
principles are correct. He has laid a broad and deep foundation for his life 
work and future years must needs accord him abundant success. 

Doctor Claypool was born on March 30, 1887, in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, and 
he is the son of Charles S. and Rosa (Redman) Claypool, both bom in 
Muskingum county, this state, and both are still living. The father is a 
contracting painter and decorator, and, owing to his superior skill, his ser- 
vices have been in great demand for many years. He is a highly regarded 
citizen. 

The son, John R., was educated in the public schools of Mt. Vernon, 
being graduated from the high school. He then entered the University of 
Louisville, where he made a splendid record and received the degree of Doc- 
tor of Medicine. After his graduation he taught one year in that institu- 
tion, which is a criterion of his ability and of the high confidence reposed in 
him by its management. 



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582 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

He then entered the medical department of the University of Michigan 
at Ann Arbor, and in due time received his degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
Thus exceptionally well equipped for his vocation, he came to Ciambier, Knox 
county, in August, 1910, and began the practice of his profession. He was 
successful from the first and his practice has constantly grown until he now 
occupies a conspicuous place among his professional brethren of this section 
of the state, having met with continued and pronounced success as a general 
practitioner. He also practices surgery, in which he is very skillful, conse- 
quently successful. He has a conveniently, modernly and systematically 
equipped office with a full line of latest designed instruments and electrical 
appliances. 

The Doctor is a young man of fine f^ysical development, engaging 
presence and affable demeanor, always a student and profound investigator. 
He is a member of the County Medical Society, the Ohio State Medical So- 
ciety and the National Medical Association. He is a member of the Masonic 
order and is medical examiner for the Bankers' Life, the John Hancock, the 
Midland Mutual and the German Commercial Life insurance companies. Po- 
litically, he is a Republican, but he has not found time to take a very active 
part in political affairs or be a candidate for office. He belongs to the 
Methodist Episcopal church. While in the university he was a member of 
the Alpha Kappa Kappa and the Theta Nu Epsilon societies. 

Doctor Claypool was married November i, 191 1, to Mary Neil Schaad, 
of Columbus, Ohio, daughter of Oswald and Louise (Neddemier) Schaad. 



CLAYTON H. BISHOP. 

The history of Knox county is the record of the steady growth of a 
community planted in the wilderness a century ago and has reached its magni- 
tude of today without other aids than those of industry. The people who 
redeemed its wilderness fastnesses were strong-armed, hardy sons of the soil 
who hesitated at no difficulty and for whom hardships had little to appall. 
The early pioneers, having blazed the path of civilization to this part of the 
state, finished their labors and passed from the scene, leaving the country to 
the possession of their descendants and to others who came at a later period 
and builded on the foundation which they laid so broad and deep. Among 
this class of sterling pioneers were the progenitors of Clayton H. Bishop, one 
of the successful citizens of Centerburg, Ohio. While their arrival was not 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 583 

SO early as some, yet they came in the formative period and each succeeding 
generation has done much to develop and advertise to the world the wonder- 
ful resources of a county that now occupies a proud position among the most 
progressive and enlightened sections of the Buckeye state. 

Mr. Bishop was born on June ii, i860, in Mt. Liberty, Knox county, 
Ohio. He is the son of Allen S. and Ann Jennette (Wayland) Bishop, both 
natives of this county, and here they grew up, were educated in the old- 
fashioned schools and were married, spending their lives on a farm. Grand- 
father Smith Bishop was a very large land owner, who came with the early 
pioneers from' Providence, Rhode Island, to Knox county about 1820, when 
the land was covered with a vast forest in which were Indians and wild 
game, the point of supplies for the people here then being at Zanesville. In 
such environments the father, Allen S. Bishop, was bom and here he grew to 
manhood and spent his life. He was a man of fine personal character and a 
hard worker and he became one of the substantial farmers of his com- 
munity. Politically, he was a Republican and he kept well informed on 
general topics, being fairly well educated for his day and a loyal party man. 
He was fond of good literature and had a remarkable memory. He lived to 
an advanced age, dying on June 17, 1909; his widow survives and is making 
her home near the town of Mt. Liberty. 

Clayton H. Bishop spent his childhood and youth on the home farm and 
he attended the district schools and the graded schools of Mt. Liberty. His 
father operated a butcher-shop at Centerburg in connection with his farming 
and when the son, the subject, was eighteen years of age he was placed in 
charge of the same and later he engaged in this line of business for himself 
there. In 1884 he purchased the insurance business of Critchfield & Ashley, 
and he is now the senior member of Bishop, Bishop & Darling. He has been 
very successful in this line of endeavor and has built up a large and ever- 
growing business. The Bishop Insurance Agency was organized many years 
ago and the subject's son, Ray B. Bishop, and Samuel A. Darling became 
interested in the same. They carry on a general insurance business, including 
life insurance; they also included real estate, in which they do a very large 
business. Mr. Bishop was the promoter of the Centerburg Building and Loan 
Association Company, which was organized in 1894, and ever since he has 
been the secretary and general manager of the same. The company is the 
largest in a town the size of Centerburg in the state, having assets of more 
than eight hundred thousand dollars. This is a prosperous and prominent 
concern, being known all over this section of Ohio, and is a great credit to 
the community. Mr. Bishop was prominent in the organization of the Cen- 

(38) 



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584 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

terburg Savings Bank Company in 1906, being the successor of the Center- 
burg Bank, the first institution of this kind in the town. He has been presi- 
dent of the same since 1908 and has discharged the duties of the same in a 
most able and praiseworthy manner, giving entire satisfaction to the stock- 
holders and patrons of the same, and doing much to increase the prestige of 
this popular, sound and conservative institution. Mr. Bishop is also president 
of the Farmers Fertilizer Company, of Columbus, Ohio. He is a director in 
the Capital Limestone Company of Columbus, the Louisa Coal Company of 
Louisa, Kentucky, and the Johnstown & Croton Telephone Company, the 
Pataskala & Hebron Telephone Company, the Central Ohio Telephone Com- 
pany. He is also president of the Centerburg Gas and Oil Company, secre- 
tary of the Little Sandy Gas and Oil Company, and is active in all these 
organizations, being by nature a man of keen discernment, sound judgment 
and a promoter and organizer. He has been very successful in whatever he 
has turned his attention to and ranks among the virile, progressive, and 
modem business men of this part of the state, whose influence in the business 
and commercial world is far-reaching. 

Mr. Bishop is prominent in Republican politics and a leader in public 
matters, but he has never been an office holder, except town councilman. He 
was appointed postmaster at Centerburg in 1897. It was then a fourth- 
class office, but is now in the third-class division. The duties of this office 
were managed in a manner that reflected much credit to himself and to the 
entire satisfaction of the department and the people. It now has four rural 
routes. He has been a member of the county committee and the central com- 
mittee of his party and has been a frequent delegate to district, county and 
state con\;entions, making his influence felt in all for the good of his com- 
munity and the party in general. 

Mr. Bishop was married on September 14. 1882, to Elizabeth Benning- 
ton, daughter of Demas and Margaret (Greenlee) Bennington, a prominent 
family of Washington county, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Bishop is a lady of cul- 
ture and refinement and was formerly a successful school teacher. This 
union has been graced b}- the birth of two sons, Ray B., who was educated in 
the Centerburg high school, and Guy C, a student in the Ohio Wesleyan 
University. 

Fraternally, Mr. Bishop is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and a 
charter meml>er of Hawthorne Lodge No. 228. He also belongs to the 
Free and Accepted Masons, Bloomfield Lodge, and to the Sons of Veterans, 
by virtue of the fact that his father was a soldier in Company A, One Hun- 
dred and Twenty-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry, during the Civil war. The 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. ' 585 

subject and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which 
he is a trustee and a member of the building committee of the same and a 
Sunday school worker. 

Mr. Bishop is the owner of over five hundred acres of valuable farming 
land in Mil ford township, this county, which is well improved and under a 
fine state of cultivation, and in addition to his many other interests he is an 
active and successful farmer. He raises much live stock, paying special at- 
tention to sheep and horses, and employs modem methods in all his farming 
and stock raising. He has one of the most attractive, commodious and mod- 
emly furnished homes in southwestern Knox county, in the midst of beauti- 
ful surroundings. As a recreation he engages in automobiling. He is a 
strong advocate of public improvements in every way and he is a leader in 
all movements looking to the general advancement of his community. He is 
a large owner of valuable and desirable town property. The Bishop home is 
the mecca of the social life of the community, being widely known as a place 
of good cheer and oldtime hospitality and here the many friends of the 
family frequently gather. 

With duties that would crush the average man, Mr. Bishop has his busi- 
ness so systematized that he carries forward his diversified affairs in an easy 
manner and with little trouble. Personally, he is unassuming, genial, oblig- 
ing, charitable and a man of the people in all that the term implies. He has 
so directed and ordered his course that he has won and retained the universal 
confidence and esteem of a vast circle of acquaintances. He is a student of 
the world's best literature, keeping his home well supplied and he is there- 
fore a man of education and culture, a genteel gentleman whom to meet is to 
admire and respect. 



JOHN M. EWALT. 



In placing John M. Ewalt, well known banker of Mt. Vernon, in the 
front rank of Knox county business men, simple justice is done to a bio- 
graphical fact, universally recognized throughout this and adjoining coun- 
ties by those at all familiar with his history. A man of judgment, sound 
discretion and business ability of a high order, he has managed with tactful 
success important enterprises and so impressed his individuality and sterling 
characteristics upon the community as to gain recognition among its leading 
citizens, judicious financiers and public-spirited men of aflfairs. , 

Mr. Ewalt was bom on May 7, 1840, one mile west of Mt. Vernon in 



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586 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

Clinton township. He is the son of a sterling old pioneer family, Henry and 
Elizabeth (Pratt) Ewalt. The paternal grandfather, John Ewalt, came to 
Knox county in 1813 from Bedford county, Pennsylvania, with his wife, 
seven sons and four daughters, and they settled two miles west of what is 
now the city of Mt. Vernon, on land he bought from the government and 
began life as a pioneer. In due course of time he became one of the prom- 
inent and well-to-do farmers of this section of the state. He gave his sons 
each one hundred and sixty acres of land as they came to manhood. For 
many years he was prominent in the affairs of this locality. He and his sons 
were all farmers except the oldest son, John, who was a blacksmith and who 
built a shop on the lot where the Knights of Pythias hall now stands on West 
Gambier street in Mt. Vernon, and it was the first blacksmith shop in the 
town. 

Henry Ewalt, father of John M., of this review, was a farmer and he 
developed two good farms from the woods west of Mt. Vernon and became 
one of the leading farmers and stock men of the county, and he was promi- 
nent in local public matters. He was a great supporter of James K. Polk for 
the Presidency in 1844. He was a man of positive convictions and took a 
delight in forwarding any worthy movement looking to the general good of 
his community, and while he was always active in public affairs he was no 
office holder. He voted the Democratic ticket straight. His family consisted 
of three sons and four daughters, namely : Ann married Samuel Bartley, 
who moved to Iowa; Mary married Benjamin lies; Andrew Jackson, who 
went to California as a gold hunter, being a member of the famous band of 
'*forty-niners;" Henry, who first moved to Illinois, later to Kansas; Sarah 
A. married Frederick Rodgers; Caroline remained single; John M., of this 
review, is the only member of the family now living. The parents of these 
children were Presbyterians and devout church people. The father's death 
occurred in 1878 and the mother died in 1872; they are buried in Mound 
View cemetery. 

John M. Ewalt spent his youth on his father's farm and attended the 
district school until he was nineteen years of age. He began life for himself 
by teaching school in the home district when he was nineteen years of age. 
Later he attended the Mt. Vernon schools and the high school, he being the 
first boy to enter the new high school building. It still stands, but has been 
enlarged and remodeled. He also attended the private school of R. R. Sloan 
prior to entering the high school. While a senior in the latter, the Civil war 
came on. William Mitchell, principal of the high school, organized a com- 
pany of which he became captain. Company A, Ninety-sixth Ohio Volunteer 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 587 

Infantry, and Mr. Ewalt enlisted in the same, in August, 1862, and he served 
very faithfully until the following April, when he was discharged on account 
of physical disability. He was sergeant of his company. He participated in 
Sherman's repulse from Vicksburg and other engagements, including the 
battle of Arkansas Post, January 11, 1863. He was sent to St. Louis with 
a boat load of three hundred sick and wounded soldiers, one hundred of 
whom died on the way. He was discharged from the service at Jefferson 
Barracks, eleven miles below St. Louis. Upon leaving the army he re- 
turned home and was married on November 5, 1863, to Sarah Ward, daugh- 
ter of Levi B. and Mary (Freeman) Ward, a pfominent pioneer family of 
Mt. Vernon, where Mr. Ward was successfully engaged in the mercantile 
business for many years. He and his wife are both deceased. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ewalt two sons and one daughter have been born, 
namely: Harry, an optician in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania; M. Cora is at 
home; J. Lewis is practicing dentistry at Lorain, Ohio; both sons are mar- 
ried, the daughter having remained single. 

After his marriage Mr. Ewalt engaged in farming and teaching school, 
alternating the two with the seasons of each year up to 1871. Mrs. Ewalt's 
death occurred in December, 1890, and she is buried in Mound View ceme- 
tery. Mr. Ewalt was married a second time, in October, 1893, his last wife 
being Bell S. Scott, daughter of John and Mary (Ankeny) Scott, an excellent 
family of Cambridge, Ohio. This union has been without issue. 

Mr. Ewalt has always taken an abiding interest in local affairs, and in 
1 87 1 he was elected county auditor on the Democratic ticket and he served 
two terms of four years. In 1865 he was appointed one of the county school 
examiners and he served in this capacity until 1876. He was a member of 
the city board of education for a period of three years. He discharged his 
duties very faithfully in ever\^ position of public trust. 

In 1874 Mr. Ewalt was one of the organizers of the Mt. Vernon Bridge 
Company, of which the present bridge company is the continuation. Mr. 
Ewalt was then the first secretary and treasurer of the company, which posi- 
tion he held with much credit to himself and to the satisfaction of the stock- 
holders for several years. In 1875, while still serving as county auditor, he 
was elected cashier of the then Knox County National Bank, and he served 
with much success in that capacity until the expiration of the bank charter 
in 1885, when the institution was chartered as the Knox National Bank, and 
he continued as cashier until the expiration of that charter in 1905. With 
the new charter the bank became the New Knox National Bank, under which 
charter it is now operating. Mr. Ewalt retired from the cashiership with the 



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588 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

expiration of the Knox National Bank, after a most faithful and commend- 
able service of thirty years, during which time he became one of the county's 
leading figures in banking circles and won a wide reputation for his able, 
conservative and judicious ability and services, which were always of a very 
high order and his pleasing personality, courtesy and straightforward deal- 
ings with the thousands of patrons won the confidence and respect. Since 
his retirement as cashier he has been vice-president of the New Knox Na- 
tional Bank. Of the thirty-seven stockholders in the bank when Mr. Ewalt 
became cashier, he is now the only one remaining. He is a banker of the 
old school, yet he has all the while kept fully abreast of the times in all 
matters pertaining to his line of endeavor, and all modem methods of bank- 
ing are familiar to him. Liberal, yet conservative, his bank has had a very 
successful career, and is one of the sound and safe as well as popular financial 
institutions of Ohio. 

Politically, Mr. Ewalt is a Democrat, but in 1896 he voted for William 
McKinley as President; since then he has called himself an independent 
Democrat. He is a member of Joe Hooker Post, Grand Army of the Re- 
public, and he and his family belong to the Baptist church and are active in 
church work, Mr. Ewalt being a deacon and a Sunday school teacher. The 
family home is a modern, commodious and attractive one, located at No. 120 
East High street in one of the choice residence districts of the city, and it is 
an important factor in the best social life of the community. Mr. Ewalt is a 
strong and likable character of sterling worth and is highly regarded by all 
classes. 



JOHN B. STINEMETZ. 

For nearly three score and ten years, or indeed all his life, an esteemed 
and worthy resident of Clinton township, Knox county, John B. Stinemetz is 
entitled to special mention with the successful and representative men of the 
western part of the county. His name has long l>een inseparably connected 
with the agricultural and industrial growth and development of the com- 
munity and in the equally important matters of education and public morals 
he has taken more than a passing interest. He has lived to see the great 
development of this favored section of the great Buckeye state and has 
played well his part in the same, for here, on his ancestral hills, he has been 
content to spend his life and he has so ordered his footsteps in the paths of 
rectitude that he has kept untarnished the escutcheon of the worthy pioneer 
name of Stinemetz. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 589 

Mr. Stinemetz was born on the farm where he still resides in Clinton 
township, this county, two miles west of the city of Mt. Vernon, on November 
21, 1842. He is the son of George and Rachael (Liter) Stinemetz, lx)th 
bom in Washington county, Maryland, where they grew to maturity and 
were married, soon afterwards coming to Knox county, Ohio, in 1826, when 
the country was sparsely settled and little improvement had been made. They 
settled just west of Mt. Vernon and two years later bought the land which is 
still in possession of the family. It was then all timbered. The elder Stine- 
metz first cleared just enough for a place on which to build his cabin, then 
began the work of carving out a farm in the woods, and here he became very 
well established, the log cabin giving way to a more pretentious home in due 
course of time and he followed farming all his life, becoming one of the 
substantial men of his neighborhood, and he was a man of upright character 
and a most worthy citizen. His death occurred in June, 1873, his widow fol- 
lowing him to the grave a few months later, on December 7th of the same 
year, and both are buried in Mound View cemetery, Mt. Vernon. They were 
the parents of nine children, only three of whom are now living, namely: 
Mary, who married Reason Welsh, is now a widow, as is also Ellen, who 
married Clark N. Craig; John B., of this sketch. 

John B. Stinemetz grew up on the home farm and received his education 
in the district schools of the locality and his opportunities for an education 
were meager, but he made the best of what he had. He was married on 
October 29, 1868, to Belinda Allen, daughter of Asahel and Content (Wing) 
Allen. A sketch of the Allen family w^ill be found on another page of this 
volume. 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Stinemetz, namely: 
Charles E., deceased ; George A. A., married Jennie M. McGagin, and is liv- 
ing on a farm in Monroe township; Cora E. married CHnton M. Graham and 
she lives with her parents on the home farm. 

The subject and his wife began housekeeping on the old home place 
and here they have continued to reside to the present time and they have 
kept the old place well improved and well tilled, so that it has lost none of its 
old-time fertility. His place of one hundred acres has yielded him a very 
comfortable annual income as a result of his industry and good management. 

Politically, Mr. Stinemetz is a Republican and he has ever been a careful, 
intelligent voter, but never an office seeker. However, he has served his 
communit}' as road commissioner and school director. He is a member of 
the Clinton Grange, Patrons of Husbandry. He and his wife belong to the 
Methodist Episcopal church and are devout church people. 



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590 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

HIRAM W. WORKMAN. 

Agriculture has been an honored vocation from the eariiest ages and as 
a usual thing men of honorable and humane impulses, as well as those of 
energy and thrift, have been patrons of husbandry. The free outdoor life of 
the farm has a decided tendency to foster and develop that independence of 
mind and self-reliance which characterizes true manhood, and no greater 
blessing can befall a boy than to be reared in close touch with nature in the 
healthful, life-inspiring labor of the fields. It has always been the fruitful 
soil from which have sprung the moral bone and sinew of the country and 
the majority of our nation's great statesmen, famous warriors, renowned 
scholars and distinguished men of letters were born on the farm and are 
indebted to its early influence for the distinction which they have attained. 

Hiram W. Workman, of Union township, Knox county, is a farmer 
and he comes of a family of tillers of the soil, who have 1 een thus engaged 
for a livelihood for generations. He was bom on February 26, 1861, in 
Tiverton township, Coshocton county, Ohio, the son of Stephen and Mary 
(Johnson) Workman, both natives of the same vicinity in which the subject 
was bom and there they were reared, grew to maturity and married, the 
father spending his entire life on the old homestead on which his birth oc- 
curred. He farmed all his life and was a substantial and influential citizen. 
Politically, he was a Democrat and adhered to the Baptist belief religiously. 
His death occurred in December, 1907, having survived his wife thirty years, 
she having preceded him to the grave on February 12, 1877, ^^^ they are 
both buried in the Baptist cemetery, near Tiverton Center, Coshocton county. 

Sixteen children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Workman, six of 
whom are living at this writing, four having died in infancy, and twelve grew 
to manhood and womanhood, namely: Hiram W,, of this sketch; Robert W. 
lives in Holmes county, Ohio; Elizabeth married William R. Parsons, of 
Holmes county; Emma married Charles Englehart, of Howard township; 
Allen Thurman lives in Holmes county, and Asa is a resident of Orville, 
Wayne county. 

Hiram W. Workman was reared on the home farm and there worked 
in the summer months as soon as he was old enough, attending the public 
schools in the winter time. He remained under his parental roof-tree until he 
was married, on November 17, 1881, to Alice Singer, daughter of John and 
Ellen (Prost) Singer, the mother having died when Mrs. Workman was an 
infant. The father is now a resident of the state of Idaho. 

Three children have been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Workman, named as 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 591 

follows: Sadie, who married Earl Ackert, of Tiverton township, Coshocton 
county ; Grover C. is at home assisting with the work on the place ; Walter is 
deceased. 

Hiram W. Workman began farming on the home place in Tiverton 
township, Coshocton county, and in 1886 he came to Union township, Knox 
county, locating one mile west of Cavilla, where he is the owner of eighty 
acres of good land which he farms and on which he raises live stock and feeds 
considerable stock each year. 

Politically, Mr. Workman is a Democrat and he has always been an ac- 
tive party man. He was assessor of Union township for two years. His popu- 
larity in his home community is shown by the fact that this is a strong Re- 
publican district and that he was elected on the Democratic ticket. He has also 
served as a member of the township board of education for several years, 
and he has been a frequent delegate to party conventions where he has always 
made his influence felt for the good of the community which he represents 
and the party in general. 



HENRY M. JACOBS. 

One of the honored young men of Knox county, a native son who has 
been content to remain in this favored section of the great Buckeye common- 
wealth, is Henry M. Jacobs, the present efficient and popular postmaster at 
Gambier. In all the relations of life he has commanded the respect and con- 
fidence of those with whom he has been brought into contact as is evidenced 
by his selection to fill the important trust which he now holds. 

Mr. Jacobs was bom in the town of Gambier, this county, on October 6, 
1875, and he is the son of Charles W. and Minerva (Benedict) Jacobs, both 
natives of Knox county, where the father devoted his life to farming. In 
later life he was a Republican in politics, but not active, though he filled a 
number of the township offices. He was a highly respected gentleman who 
led a clean, industrious life. His death occurred in December, 1906; his 
widow is living in Gambier, where, like her husband before her, she has 
many warm friends. 

The son, Henry M., of this review, was educated in the public schools 
of Gambier. His first employment after finishing school was in the office of 
the Cleveland, Akron & Columbus railroad at Gambier, remaining with the 
company four years, rendering high grade and eminently satisfactory service. 
In 1897 he became assistant postmaster at Gambier, and served in 



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592 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

this capacity in a most capable manner until November, 19 lo, when 
he was appointed postmaster, succeeding E. P. Webster, whose 
death occurred at that time. He has given both the department and the peo- 
ple faithful and conscientious service and proven to be one of the best post- 
masters the town has ever had. Politically, he is a Republican and has been 
active in party matters since attaining his majority. He was the representa- 
tive from Gambier on the Republican county central committee for several 
years, and he has been a frequent delegate to county and district conventions. 
He has served as township clerk for thirteen years, from the time he became 
old enough to vote until he was appointed postmaster. He is now a member 
of the board of education of Gambier. This postoffice is a presidential third 
class office and three rural routes start from here, Route No. i being one of 
the first in the county. 

Mr. Jacobs w^as married on July 26, 1901, to Eva Webster, daughter of 
Erwin P. and Sarah (Chaney) Webster. Mr. Webster was for many years 
agent for the Cleveland, Akron & Columbus railroad at Gambier and from 
1897 "^^^1 his death, in the fall of 1910, he was postmaster at Gambier. His 
wife preceded him to the grave several years. They were highly respected 
people. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacobs have one child, Edwin W. Mr. Jacobs is a member 
of Mt. Zion Lodge No. 9, Free and Accepted Masons, at Mt. Vernon, also 
a member of the chapter. He affiliates with the Methodist Episcopal church, 
of which his wife is a member. They are popular in the best society of the 
county and are pleasant people to meet. 



WILLIAM M. CARLISLE. 

One of the progressive and respected men of affairs in the county of 
Knox is William M. Carlisle, of Gambier, a man who has always taken a 
great interest in the advancement of his locality and endorses every move- 
ment which he believes will prove a benefit to humanity. He is a sociaWe 
gentleman and is held in the highest regard by all who know him. His 
achievements represent the result of honest endeavor along lines where ma- 
ture judgment has opened the way. By pluck and energy, controlled by 
correct principles and founded upon unswerving honor, he has attained to a 
position meriting the respect and admiration of his fellow men which they 
gladly give. 

Mr. Carlisle was bom on March 28, 1861, in Olive Green, Delaware 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 593 

county, Ohio, and is the son of Zachariah and Jennie (Caldwell) Carlisle. 
The father was born in Licking county, Ohio, and the mother in England, 
from which country she emigrated to the United States when seven years of 
age. The father was a physician and during the early years of his professional 
career he lived at Newark, Licking county, Ohio. He served through the 
Civil war, enlisting as a musician, having been connected with a band in 
Newark as a young man, but later was transferred to the hospital corps. He 
enlisted at the first call for troops and was at the front all through the strug- 
gle. After serving three months, he re-enlisted in the Eighteenth Infantry, 
regular army and served in the hospital service, in this splendid body of 
fighting men until the close of the war. Following the war, he gave up his 
practice and settled in Gambier for a few years, then went to Arkansas City, 
Arkansas, and there he continued the practice of medicine and there he 
spent the balance of his life, dying in 1904; his widow is living in Oklahoma. 
William M. Carlisle grew to manhood in his native community and he 
went to Arkansas with the family, later returning to Mt. Vernon, Ohio, and 
here he studied medicine with Dr. J. F. Hess and was admitted to practice 
in 1884, then went to Arkansas City where he engaged in practice for about 
one year, then returned to the home of his uncle, William Oliver, in Gam- 
bier, in whose family he had spent so much of his childhood. Mr. Oliver 
was a prominent factor in the affairs of Gambier for many years. His wife 
died in 1885 and the subject returned to Gambier to be with Mr. Oliver, who 
was thus left alone. On May 28, 1885, Mr. Carlisle was married to Adelia 
Hanlen, of Columbus, Ohio. After his marriage he moved to one of Mr. 
Oliver's farms in Monroe township, Knox county, and there engaged in farm- 
ing. The subject has one daughter, Mary Olive, now the wife of Wilfred 
Perry, of Cleveland. Mr. Carlisle lived on this farm until November, 1905, 
when he built a modern home in Gambier where he has since resided. It is 
an attractive, commodious and modemly equipped residence, the equal of 
any in this part of the county. He has engaged most successfully in gen- 
eral farming and stock raising, making a specialty of shorthorn cattle and 
fine hogs. By diligence and good management he has met with a large 
measure of success and laid by a competency. He owns over two hundred 
acres of as fine land as the county can boast, all well improved and 
under a high state of cultivation. He employed all modern methods in his 
agricultural work, believing in keeping abreast of the times and for years 
he has been regarded as. one of the most progressive of local farmers. As a 
physician, he met with success and enjoyed a large practice, as did his father, 
but the freer life of the country appealed to him most and he gaye up 
practice. 



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594 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Politically, Mr. Carlisle is a Republican and he has long been actice 
and influential in public matters. In 1910 he was land appraiser for Gambier 
and College township. He has served as a member of the Republican county 
central and the executive committees and has been a frequent delegate to 
county, district and state conventions. He was one of the promoters of 
the Knox County Agricultural Fair and was a member of the board of di- 
rectors until 1910. Much of its success was due to his efforts. His support 
may always be dej^ended upon in the advancement of all matters pertaining 
to the general goo<l of the community and county, and his advice is often 
sought in public matters. 

Mr. Carlisle has been much interested in improved conditions of farm- 
ing and stock raising and has done as much, if not more, than any other 
man in his locality to bring about a better condition. He has made a careful 
study of soils, rotation of crops, fertilizers, climatic conditions, grains and 
the relation of each to the other, and has long been an advocate of scientific 
and **intensive'' farming, employing such methods as would bring the max- 
imum returns for the least amount of labor and expense. 

Mr. Carlisle is a member of the Sons of Veterans, \yilliam Harding 
Camp No. 63, at Gambier; he also belongs to Pleasant Grange, Patrons of 
Husbandry, and has been active in Grange affairs as well as in all organiza- 
tions of farmers. He is an enthusiastic advocate of farmers* institutes, 
corn associations and all organizations calculated to improve farms and the 
condition of farmers, and he is frequently a speaker at these meetings. He 
and his family are members of the Episcopalian church and are active in 
church work. Mr. Carlisle finds recreation about his own home. He is fond 
of a good horse and also all athletic games and out-dodr amusements. He 
is also a chicken fancier, making a specialty of raising brown Leghorns and 
keeps a large number in his poultry yards. The Carlisle family is prominent 
in the social life of the community, and their pleasant home is the frequent 
gathering place for their many friends. 



WILLIAM L. WARD. 

Among those men of Knox county w^ho, by the force of their person- 
ality, have forged their way toward the front ranks of the class of citizens 
who may justly be termed progressive, is William L. Ward, the well knowm 
liveryman of Mt. Vernon, and who also has a fine farm in this vicinity which 
he has taken a great interest in and which he has improved in a most system- 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 595 

atic way until it is the equal of any in the community where it is so admirably 
located. He is a man who has dealt honestly with his fellow men and there- 
fore has their confidence and friendship. 

Mr. Ward was born on October 24, 1870, in Miller township, this 
county. He is the son of Joe M. and Alethea (Rowland) Ward, the father 
a native of Ashland county, Ohio, and the mother of Richland county, this 
state. After their marriage they came to Knox county, Ohio, in 1863 and 
located in Mil ford township, later moving to Miller township, where the 
subject was born. The father was a carpenter and* contractor and owing to 
his skill and fair dealings his services were in great demand and he turned 
out many important jobs from year to year, and many of the substantial 
buildings of various kinds throughout the locality stand today as monuments 
to his ability in this connection. He also farmed a great deal during the 
latter years of his life. He was a soldier in Company B, One 
Hundred and Forty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, during the Civil war, 
serving gallantly until the close of the struggle. Politically, he was a Demo- 
crat and while he was always a voter, was never an office seeker. He was a 
member of the Grand Army of the Republic and the Methodist Episcopal 
church, while his wife was a member of the Baptist church. He was a man 
of exemplary character, and his death occurred on August 28, 1903, his 
wife having preceded him to the grave in Septeml^er, 1896. 

Three sons and three daughters were born to Mr. and Mrs. Joe M. 
Ward, five of whom are living, namely : Sarah F. is deceased ; Laura A. 
married W. W. Stockbridge, of Croton, Licking county, Ohio; John E. is 
married and is living in Mt. Vernon ; Mary J. married M. J. Clutter, of Mil- 
ford township; Herman is married and is living in Miller township; William 
L. of this sketch. 

William L. Ward was reared on the home farm, where he assisted with 
the general work about the place when he became of proper age, and he 
received his education in the public schools of the township. For a time 
prior to his marriage he was engaged in the coal business in Mt. Vernon. 

On July 8, 1899, Mr. Ward was united in marriage with Anna Belle 
Graham, daughter of DeWitt C. and Rebecca (Behanna) Graham, of Miller 
township, but natives of Pennsylvania, a highly respected family. Four 
children have been bom to the subject and wife, namely: Lucy E., Charles G.. 
Louie Gladys is deceased; Wilma Beatrice. 

Mr. Ward began his married life on the home farm in Miller township, 
where he remained two years, then went to Hunt's Station, where he en- 
gaged in the grain, hay and coal business for a period of seven years, and 



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596 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

for about four years of this period he operated in this vicinity for the J. S. 
McConnell Company of Mt. Vernon. He soon built up an extensive trade 
in this line and met with much success. In 1907 he came to Mt. Vernon 
and engaged in the livery business and here he has remained, enjoying an 
ever-growing patronage. He has a large, well-stocked barn, good horses 
and modern equipment, everything kept up to date, in fact, he spares neither 
pains nor expense in rendering the public prompt and efficient service. Mr. 
Ward is also the owner of a fine farm a half mile west of Mt. Vernon, 
which is well improved and under a high state of cultivation and which he 
supervises in a general way. 

Politically, Mr. Ward is a Democrat and he has served his township as 
clerk and he has been clerk of the board of elections for two years in Miller 
township. He takes much interest in local party affairs. In his fraternal 
relations he is a member of the Knights of Pythias, the Mt. Vernon lodge, 
and he also belongs to the Knights of the Maccabees. He and his wife are 
members of the Baptist church and have long been active in church and Sun- 
day school work, he having been superintendent of the Sunday school and 
a deacon in the church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ward are pleasant people to meet, and they have many, 
friends throughout the county. 



HARRY HOLMES. 



Agriculture has been the true source of man's dominion on earth ever 
since the primal existence of labor and has been the pivotal industry that has 
controlled, for the most part, all the fields of action to which his intelligence 
and energy have been devoted. In a civilized community no calling is so 
certain of yielding a compensatory reurn as that which is culled from a 
kindly soil, albeit at times the husbandman is sorely taxed in coaxing from 
mother earth all that he desires or even expects: yet she is a kind mother 
and seldom chastens with disappointment the child whose diligence and 
frugality she deems it but just should be rewarded. One of the farmers of 
College township, Knox county, on whom the aforesaid Mother Nature seems 
to have been unsparing in her largesses is Harry Holmes, who was born one 
mile north of Gambier in Monroe township, and who has spent his life in his 
home community. He is the son of Josiah and Sarah (Wasson) Holmes. 
The father came to Monroe township with his parents when he w*as seven 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 597 

years of age and here he was reared, residing on the same farm until his 
death. Lemuel Holmes, grandfather of the subject, came from Baltimore, 
Maryland, to Coshocton county, Ohio, in an early day and there settled on a 
farm. Grandfather Wasson was also a farmer all his life. Josiah Holmes, 
mentioned above, was one of the most progressive farmers of his township 
and one of the first to make an effort to improve his live stock, especially 
horses, and he bought the first Percheron stallion for that purpose and did 
much to improve the breed of horses in this county. He was one of the 
substantial and highly esteemed men of his community. He was a Repub- 
lican in politics and his religious faith reposed with the Episcopalians, though 
a few years prior to his death he united with the Methodist Episcopal church. 
His death occurred in April, 1892, his wife having preceded him to the grave 
several years. She was a native of Delaware county, Ohio. 

Harry Holmes, of this sketch, spent his childhood and youth on the 
home farm and there assisted with the general farm work, attending the dis- 
trict schools in the winter, in Monroe township and in the town of Gambier, 
also Kenyon Military Academy. 

Mr. Holmes was married on August 16, 1883, to Celestie Wolfe, 
daughter of Jacob and Mary Ann (McArtor) Wolfe, a prominent family of 
Harrison township. The Wolfe family came from Pennsylvania, John 
Wolfe, Mrs. Holmes' grandfather, having been one of the pioneers of this 
country. One daughter has been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Holmes, Ethel R., 
who married Jasper F. Walker. The latter is associated with the subject in 
farming and is a young man of much promise. He is extensively engaged 
in raising American thoroughbred Delaine sheep and his flocks are regarded 
as among the best in the country, in fact, are not surpassed in the state. His 
sheep find a market in all parts of the country for breeding purposes. He is 
an exhibitor at county and state fairs, also at the National Stock Exhibit at 
Chicago, and he has won many prizes wherever he has shown his fine stock. 
Mr. and Mrs. Walker have two children, a son and a daughter, Ruth M. 
and Harlow H. 

After his marriage, Harry Holmes turned his attention to farming on 
his own account, which he followed several years, then became steward for 
three years at the Harcourt Seminary at Gambier. Following this he en- 
gaged in the grocery business in Mt. \'ernon for three and one-half years. 
But he was never fully satisfied away from the farm, so he returned to hus- 
bandry. In connection with general farming he raised thoroughbred sheep. 
In 1907 he and Mrs. Holmes left the farm and moved to a fine home in 
Gambier, attractively and modernly finished, surrounded by spacious, well- 



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598 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

kept grounds. His farm contains two hundred and seven acres of fertile 
and well kept land, under a high state of improvement and cultivation. The 
grounds surrounding his Gambier home consist of thirteen acres of valuable 
land. Mr. * Holmes spends considerable time raising chickens, and his 
brown Leghorns are much admired by all who see them. 

, Mr. Holmes is a Prohibitionist and was mayor of Gambier in 191 1, the 
duties of which office he discharged in a manner that reflected much credit 
upon himself and to the satisfaction of all concerned. He has served on 
the Gambier board of education. He is thoroughly in touch with public 
matters and lends his support to all measures having for their object the 
general good of the people of his community. He and his family are mem- 
bers of the Disciples church, and he is an elder in the same. Mrs. Holmes 
IS a refined and cultured woman and they are prominent in the social life of 
the community, their friends being numbered only by the limits of their 
acquaintance. 



CHARLES W. COE. 



The popular citizen and enterprising business man whose name furnishes j 

the heading of this review needs no formal introduction to the people of Knox 
county. Long identified with the agricultural and business interests of the 
community, he has taken an abiding interest in the welfare of the same in all 
phases of its development, and has forged to the front ranks as a man of 
affairs, besides earning an honorable reputation as a man of integrity and 
wholesome ideals. He represents a sterling pioneer family. ^ 

Charles W. Coe, well known president of the Building and Loan As- I 

sociation of Centerburg, was born on December 25, 1848, in Washington 
township, Licking county, Ohio, and is the son of Charles H. and Eliza Ann j 

(Conard) Coe. The father came to Licking county when three years old 
with his parents, Joshua and Mary (Burgone) Coe. from Maryland in 1826, I 

and the grandfather, Joseph Conard, came here from Virginia in 1805, 
settling in what is now Morgan township when the country" was a wilderness, 
and here he remained a number of years, finally selling out and moving to 
what is now Washington township. Licking county, settling where the town 
of Utica now stands. He was a farmer and he established the first tannery 
in the locality. When the father of the subject married he also engaged in 
the tanning business, following the same for many years, later turning his 
attention to farming, finally giving up the tanning business. He was a soldier 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 599 

in the Civil war, a member of the First Ohio Independent Sharpshooters. He 
was an exceptionally good shot, and prior to this service of about two years 
he was a recruiting officer. While in the service he was captain of a company 
of the sharpshooters and was attached to different regiments at various times, 
and he saw some hard service with the different armies. After the close of 
the war he came to Hilliar township, Knox county, Ohio, in 1865 and en- 
gaged in farming, in which he prospered, both as a general farmer and a 
sheep raiser. He died December 20, 191 1, at the age of eighty-eight years, 
on his fine three-hundred-and-fifty-acre farm, a half mile north of Center- 
burg. His first wife died in December, 1873, she l)eing the mother of the 
subject, and the father married again, his second w^ife surviving at this writ- 
ing. Four children, two sons and two daughters, were bom to Charles H. 
Coe and his first wife, namely: /Mice, now the wife of George Rinehart, 
her husband being now deceased; Charles W., of this sketch; Jennie mar- 
ried Joseph Sutton, a farmer of Hilliar township; and Judson C, of Center- 
burg, all living. 

Charles \\\ Coe grew to manhood on the home farm and his first activ- 
ities were in his father's tannery. He attended the public schools and one 
year in the normal school at Lebanon, Ohio, also attended Ohio Wesleyan 
University at Delaware, then spent one year at Michigan University at Ann 
Arbor. Thus well equipped for his life work, he left college and began life 
by clerking in a drug store in Springfield, having taken the course in phar- 
macy at Ann Arbor, Michigan, for one year. After spending a year at Spring- 
field, he returned to the home farm, undertaking the management of the same, 
and for a period of twenty-seven years he operated the same in a most suc- 
cessful manner, carrying on general farming and stock raising, making a 
specialty of sheep. During the latter years of his farming operations, in 
1893, he moved to Centerburg for the purpose of making his future home, 
but retained his farming interests. He was one of the organizers of the 
Building and Loan Association and after two years he l)ecame president of 
the same, which position he still holds, having discharged the duties of the 
same in a manner that reflects much credit upon himself and to the eminent 
satisfaction of all concerned, in fact his judicious management has been 
largely due to its large success. It is one of the most successful of its kind 
in the state. In 1901 Mr. Coe became associated with the Centerburg Bank, 
and was made vice-president of the same and has filled this position with rare 
ability ever since. The bank has since been reorganized and is now known 
as the Centerburg Savings Bank Company, under the state laws. Mr. Coe is 

(39) 



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600 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

also interested in the Johnston & Croton and the Patalaska & Hebron Tele- 
phone Companies, being one of the promoters of each and he has been a 
director in these companies from, their organization. He is also the vice- 
president of the Centerburg Gas Company, president of the Little Sandy Oil 
and Gas Company, operating in Licking county, and vice-president of the 
Farmers Fertilizer Company, of Columbus, Ohio. He is president of the 
Capitol Limestone Company of Columbus. All the above named corpora- 
tions are at present in a prosperous condition. He is also interested in the 
Louisa Coal Company, of Louisa, Kentucky, and is a stockholder in various 
other corporations, and is thus a very busy man of affairs. He also has valu- 
able farming interests in Knox and Licking counties. He is by nature 
an organizer and promoter, a man of keen discernment, sound judgment and 
rare business acumen, possessing the foresight to see with remarkable accu- 
racy the future outcome of a present transaction. Few business men of the 
county are more widely or favorably known in business circles of this part of 
the state, and none are more deserving of their success. 

Mr. Coe was married on December 25, 1880, to Belle L. Riley, a lady 
of culture and refinement, and the daughter of John and Susan (Curtis) 
Riley, a prominent and highly esteemed family of Hilliar township, both 
parents being now deceased. 

Fraternally, Mr. Coe belongs to the Masonic order, the chapter and 
commandery, at Mt. Vernon and the Ancient Afabic Order of Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine at Columbus. He and his wife belong to the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, he being a trustee of the same. 

Mr. and Mrs. Coe have spent considerable time in travel, visiting Florida, 
Cuba and the Isle of Pines, where he has business interests. Politically, he 
is a Republican and is a local leader in the party, ahvays active in its affairs, 
though he has never been an aspirant for public office, preferring to devote 
his attention exclusively to his large business interests. He has been a fre- 
quent delegate to various conventions of his party, in all of which he has 
made his influence felt for the good of the same and his community. 

Personally, Mr. Coe is a refined, genteel, broad-minded gentleman, pro- 
gressive in all that the term implies, obliging and straightforward in his 
dealings with his fellow men, a man w'hose word is as good as the bond of 
most men and whose life has been so exemplary and praiseworthy that he has 
ahvays enjoyed the good will and confidence of those with w'hom he has 
come into contact. Public-spirited, charitable and unassuming, he merits the 
high esteem in which he is universally held. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 6oi 



GEORGE P. LaPORTE. 



Examples that impress force of character on all who study them are 
worthy of record. By a few general observations may be conveyed some idea 
of the high standing of George P. LaPorte, the popular publisher of the 
Danville Herald, and one of the public-spirited and representative men of 
Knox county, whose interests he has at heart and which he seeks to promote, 
advocating such measures as have for their object the material, civic and 
moral good of the locality, and as a result of his many commendable char- 
acteristics he is held in high esteem by all classes, irrespective of party 
alignment. 

Mr. LaPorte was born on September 19, 1875, in Coshocton county, 
Ohio. He is the son of Wallace B. and Amy B. (Ganson) LaPorte, both 
natives of Ohio. The father devoted his life to carpentering and many of 
the best buildings in various sections of Coshocton and Knox counties stand 
as monuments to his skill. He went to Riverside, California, in 1904, where 
he has since resided, engaged in carpentering and contracting. The mother 
has been long deceased, having passed away in Octol^er, 1879. 

George P. LaPorte, of this review, spent his early life in Kansas where 
he was taken when one year old by his parents. The family returned to 
Ohio in 1883 and settled in Ashland county, where the father resumed his 
trade, and there the subject received his education in the public schools. Later 
the family moved to Richland county where they remained four or five years, 
and in the fall of 1889 they moved to Danville, Knox county, and here the 
subject has since resided. 

George P. LaPorte earned his first dollar by working for his uncle, J. W. 
Kirk, of Richland county, and after coming to Danville he worked at what- 
ever he could get to do and finished his education in the Danville high school, 
after which he entered the office of the Damille Herald to learn the printer's 
trade. He went to Akron, Ohio, in 1900 and worked for the Werner Print- 
ing Company for a period of seven years and in February, 1908, he returned 
to Danville and worked for the Danville Herald again, this time as foreman. 
It was then owned by Paul Welker. In February, 191 1, Mr. I^Porte pur- 
chased the paper and has since been editor, proprietor and publisher. He has 
increased the circulation of the same, improved its mechanical appearance and 
rendered it a valuable advertising medium and an influential factor in shap- 
ing and molding local public opinion, its prestige being gradually on the in- 
crease. The Herald is independent in politics and it stands for the develop- 
ment of Danville and vicinity along all lines. Its columns teem with the 



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602 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

best, latest and most important news, succinctly and crisply set forth, and its 
editorials carry weight, whatever the topic under consideration. Mr. La- 
Porte also conducts a job printing department which is thoroughly equipped 
with modern machinery and appliances such as insure prompt and high-grade 
work. 

On March i8, 1900, Mr. La Porte was united in marriage with Genie 
Van Horn, daughter of R. and Mary (Hess) Van Horn, an influential family 
of Danville, early settlers of this vicinity. Twosons and two daughters have 
been born to the subject and wife, namely: Bernard R., Ralph T., M. Arline 
and Frances E. 

Politically, Mr. LaPorte is a Republican, but he has never been very 
active in public affairs and never an oflfice holder. He belongs to the Knights 
of the Maccabees, the Masonic order and the Modern Woodmen of America. 
He and his wife are members of the Christian church, in which he is a trustee 
and they are active in church and Sunday school work. 

Mr. LaPorte has other business interests aside from his newspaper and 
job office, and is a very busy man and one of the leaders of eastern Knox 
county. Personally, the subject is obliging, a good mixer and is always 
ready to do his full share in furthering the interests of his town and com- 
munity. 



CHARLES C. LOGSDON. 

When the evening shadows of old age lie al)Out us, it is quite the 
usual thing for a person to look back over his life to find out w^hether the 
world is any better for his having lived. It must be a gloomy retrospect in- 
deed when no good can be found upon such an examination. On the other 
hand, what a delightful satisfaction it must be to any one to know that his 
life has been an example of excellence for the guidance of youth and for 
the congratulation of age. How many old i>ersons who read these lines 
can truthfully hold up their heads and declare that the world is better for 
their having lived. It is a pleasure to chronicle the events in a career of a 
man who has the highest respect of all his acquaintances, such as Charles C. 
Logsdon, long a well-known business man of Danville, Union township, and 
one of the worthy pioneer sons of Knox county, which he has lived to see 
advance from the wilderness to one of the foremost communities in the 
great Buckeye commonwealth, and none has been happier in its phenomenal 
progress than he. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 603 

Mr. Logsdon was born in Union township, this county, on May 31. 
1839. He is the son of David and Rebecca (Uhl) Logsdon, both bom in 
Maryland. The Logsdons were Scotch and emigrated to America with Lord 
Baltimore and settled in Maryland and Kentucky. The Uhls were of Ger- 
man blood and they, too, came to the United States in an early period. The 
parents of the subject were married in Maryland and came to Knox county, 
Ohio, about 1825 when the country was sparsely settled and practically a 
vast forest. They first settled in Danville and later moved to a farm in Union 
township and began to clear the land for farming. They underwent the 
usual hardships and privations incident to pioneer life and in due course of 
time they became very comfortably fixed through their industry and frugal 
habits. The elder Logsdon was a man of fine intelligence and upright char- 
acter and he was influential in the affairs of his community. He was bom 
in 1809 and his death occurred in 1876. His wife was born in 1808 and 
her death occurred in 1885. 

Charles C. Logsdon was reared on the farm and when of proper age 
he assisted his father in the fields and he received such education as the early 
country schools afforded. He remained under his parental roof-tree until he 
was twenty-one years of age, then worked at farming for his neighbors for 
some time. He was slow in learning the English alphabet, but learned spell- 
ing phonetically and got to be the champion speller in school of all ages, al- 
though he did not know a letter in the a]phal:)et. Later he learned the mil- 
lers' trade and operated the mill at Gambier for six years and then moved to 
a farm which he purchased, near Monroe Mills, in Monroe township, and 
there he remained fifteen years. In 1883 he moved to Indei>€ndence, Kansas, 
and engaged in the shorthorn cattle business and farmed extensively, pros- 
pering through close application and good management and I^ecoming an ex- 
tensive land owner and one of the substantial men of that locality. 

Mr. Logsdon was first married in September, 1867, to Amelia Hayes, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Hayes, of Harrison township, Knox county, 
Ohio, and to this union two sons have been bom, Carey L., now in the railway 
mail service, but recently admitted to the 1)ar, and expects to follow the law, 
and Clemen J., of Osborn, Greene county, Ohio. The wife and mother 
passed to her rest in July, 1887, while living in Kansas, and she was brought 
back to her old home in Union Grove, Knox county, Ohio, for interment. In 
September, 1890. Mr. Logsdon was again married to Alice G. Critchfield, 
daughter of Hiram and Harriet Critchfield, of Knox county, an early pioneer 
family. This union has been without issue. 

After the death of his first wife, Mr. Logsdon returned to Buckeye 



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604 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

City, Knox county, Ohio, and lived a retired life for several years, then 
moved to Columbus for the purpose of educating his sons in the Ohio State 
University, and that city was his home for a period of eight years, while his 
sons were attending school. Then he returned to Buckeye City and engaged 
in the cement business, manufacturing cement building blocks, ornamental 
work and monuments and he met w^ith a large measure of success in this field. 
He has a fine modern residence of cement block, delightfully located, com- 
manding a beautiful view of the surrounding country, in fact, his is the 
finest residence in Danville and Buckeye City. Mr. Logsdon is now living 
a retired life, enjoying the fruits of his former years of endeavor. He has 
been very successful in a business way and has large interests and a com- 
petency. 

Politically Mr. Logsdon has always been a Democrat, but has never 
been active or held anything but township offices, such as trustee and assessor. 
He belongs to the Knights of Columbus. He and his family are members of 
the Catholic church and are devout people, standing high in all circles of the 
community. 



CLINTON M. RICE. 



An enumeration of the enterprising men of Knox county, Ohio, who 
have won recognition and success for themselves and at the same time have 
conferred honor upon the community, would be incomplete were there failure 
to make mention of the popular gentleman whose name initiates this review. 
Clinton M. Rice, of Danville, holds worthy prestige in business circles and 
has always been distinctively a man of affairs and wields a wide influence 
among those with whom his lot has been cast, having won definite success 
and shown what a man of lofty principles, honesty of purpose and determi- 
nation can w in if properly controlled, as his have evidently been, and because 
of his industry, integrity and courtesy he has always stood high in the estima- 
tion of the people and merits in every way their esteem. 

Mr. Rice was born on November 6, 1857, on a farm in Brown township, 
this county. He is the son of Ephraim and Mary M. (Porter) Rice. The 
father was born in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, and the mother in Knox 
county, Ohio. The father came to Knox county with his parents, Isaac and 
Cordelia (Longs worth) Rice, in 1826 and settled on a farm in Union town- 
ship where they remained two years, and in 1828 they moved to Jefferson 
township in which they spent the remainder of their lives engaged in agricul- 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 605 

tural pursuits. The father was a prog^ressive, public-spirited man of affairs 
and he became a large land owner in Brown township. In connection with 
general farming he raised horses of excellent breeds. Politically, he was a 
Democrat and active in public affairs, and he filled various offices in his 
township. He was a member of the Methodist church. His death occurred in 
April, 1888; his widow, a woman of many estimable attributes, still survives, 
being now advanced in years. 

Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Ephraim Rice, namely: 
Clinton M., of this sketch; Tamzen J. married Solomon Ross, of Jelloway, 
this county ; Emma F. married Peter Wise, of Brown township ; Harriet E. 
married Eugene Loney, of Brown township; Sol B. lives in Danville; William 
B. lives on the home farm in Brown township; Jay J. C. died in May, 1908. 

Clinton M. Rice was reared on the home farm and he was educated in 
the country district schools, and the Central Normal School at Danville, also 
spent part of one year at Kenyon College. Thus well equipped for life's work, 
he began teaching, which he followed with marked success for a period of 
ten years in the district schools of Knox county. In 1886 he engaged in 
the banking business with Albert I. Wolfe as the Danville Bank for ten 
years, Mr. Rice being cashier, from which position he retired in 1895, but 
still retained a financial interest. While teaching, Mr. Rice read law with 
Judge J. B. Waight, of Mt. Vernon, and after giving up teaching he went 
to Fayettsville, Arkansas, for the practice of law, but his health failing 
there, he remained less than a year. He was admitted to the bar in that 
state. Upon his return to Danville, Ohio, he opened a law and real estate 
office in 1898, which he still maintains in Danville, and he has built up a 
large business in each. In" recent years he has been actively engaged in the 
gas development of this section of Ohio, being identified with the Mohegan 
Oil & Gas Company. He has settled a large number of estates, having a 
large business in the probate court, and is a very active and busy man. He 
has various business interests, owning several farms in this county, also 
owns land elsewhere. He is a man of sound judgment, keen discernment 
and wise foresight, and his integrity is unquestioned so that he has ever 
enjoyed the good will and confidence of the people with whom he has 
dealings. 

Mr. Rice was married on November 4, 1886, to Ocena M. Gilmore, a 
lady of culture and refinement, the daughter of Francis and Mary (Loney) 
Gilmore, a prominent family of Pike township, this count}^ This union 
has been graced by the birth of one daughter, Mary C, who lives at home. 

Politically, Mr. Rice is a I>emocrat and he has been active and influential 



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6o6 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

in public affairs. He was a member of the Danville board of education for 
seventeen years consecutively. He was a member of the board when the 
high school, one of the best in the county, was established. He is a member 
of the Democratic county central committee, and has been a frequent 
delegate to county, district and state conventions, and he has made his in- 
fluence felt for the good of his community and the party. As a public 
servant he has been most diligent and conscientious and won the approval 
of all, irrespective of party alignment. He is a member of the Methodist 
church and has l>een active in church and Sunday school work and is a 
class leader and liberal supporter of the church. He is a man of liberal 
ideas, broad-minded, progressive in all that the term implies, obliging, genial 
and ever vigilant of the best interests of his town and county. 



HERSCHEL J. CHAPPELEAR. 

Action is the keynote of the character of all who achieve success on 
this planet of ours — action subtly planned and carefully carried out. The 
successful life story of the energetic young man whose name forms the 
caption of this biography is a case in point, l>eing one of a determined 
struggle for a definite purpose. 

Mr. Chappelear was born on June 15, 1876, in Brazil, Indiana, and he 
is the son of William and Margaret (McMullen) Chappelear. The father 
was an undertaker and in 1877 ^^ moved with his family to Gratiot. Lick- 
ing county, Ohio, where he engaged in the undertaking business and be- 
came well established, and under him the son, Herschel J., learned this line 
of endeavor. He grew up and attended the public schools at Gratiot and 
later attended the high school at Mt. Perrj-, Perry county, Ohio. He began 
assisting his father at his business at a very early age and when thirteen 
years old he conducted a funeral himself. He took a course in the Massa- 
chusetts College of Embalming, at Boston, receiving his degree in due 
course of time and making an exceptionally fine record there. Later he 
took a post-graduate course at the Echels Embalming College at Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, and thus unusually well equipped for his life work, he began 
business for himself when twenty-one years of age, establishing himself 
at his old home, Gratiot, Ohio, succeeding his father, who retired from active 
work. He continued at Gratiot until 1902, when he came to Mt. Vernon, 
where he has since continued in the undertaking business. He is universally 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 607 

regarded as an expert in all that pertains to his line and is equipped with 
everything necessary for the embalming and proper care of bodies. His 
ambulance and funeral cars are all thoroughly in keeping with a modem and 
thoroughly equipped funeral outfit. He handles caskets of every descrip- 
tion, from the plainest to the most elaborate, and of all designs. 

Mr. Chappelear was married in March, 1897, ^^ Mattie Morrison, and 
this union has been blessed by the birth of four children, namely : Raymond, 
now fourteen years old; Ralph, whose age is eleven years; Margaret is nine 
years old and Paul has reached his sixth birthday. 

Mr. Chappelear is a member of the Masonic order, the Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, the Modem Woodmen of America, the Fratemal Order of 
Eagles, the Knights of the Golden Eagle, the Improved Order of Red Men, 
the Knights of the Maccabees, and he also belongs to the Sons of Veterans, 
his father having served through the Civil war in the Union army. He is 
held in high favor in all these lodges. He and his family are members of 
the Methodist Protestant church. His parents are still living, residents of 
Mt. Veripn. The family home is at No. 527 East Gambier street in a very 
popular residence district. 



FRENCH W. SEVERNS. 

One of the leading business men and public-spirited citizens of Mt. 
Vernon, Knox county, is French W. Severns, a man who has figured more 
or less conspicuously in the material and civic aflfairs of his locality for 
over a quarter of a century. As a citizen, his reputation is unimpeachable 
and as a neighbor and friend he is widely respected, none in the county 
standing higher in public esteem. 

Mr. Severns was born on December 5, 1862, on a farm near New- 
castle. Coshocton county, Ohio. He is the son of Isaac D. and Elizabeth 
(Mills) Severns. In 1871 the family moved to Pleasant township, Knox 
county, where the father engaged in fanning, becoming one of the sub- 
stantial farmers of his community. Politically, he was a Democrat and was 
active in public aflfairs. He w^as trustee of the township for several years, 
also filled other public oflfices. His death occurred in May, 1906; his widow 
survives, still making her home on the farm in Pleasant township. 

Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Isaac D. Severns, named as 



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6o8 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

follows: Melissa, now Mrs. Hagaman, of Huron county, Ohio; Sarah mar- 
ried C. A. Hagerty, of California; French W., of this sketch; Edgar C, of 
Chicago ; Clementine, the oldest child, died at the age of twenty-three years. 

French W. Severns, of this sketch, was reared on the home farm and 
educated in the district schools of his" home community, later attending the 
Baptist College at Hillsdale, Michigan, after which he returned home and 
remained on the farm until his marriage, on November 30, 1891, to Olive 
E. Hagaman, daughter of John and Julia (Walls) Hagaman, a well-known 
family of Mt. Vernon. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Severns five children have been born, named as 
follows: Edna M., Robert D., John E., Elizabeth J. and Josephine, all at 
home at this writing. 

For several years following his marriage, Mr. Severns farmed in Pleas- 
ant township, and in 1900 he left the farm and moved to Mt. Vernon, where 
he has since resided, having been active in business affairs and where he has 
a modern and attractive home. 

Politically, Mr. Severns is a Democrat and he has taken much more 
than a passing interest in public affairs since reaching maturity. He was 
clerk of Pleasant township for a number of years, also a member of the 
board of education. As a public servant he has always performed his 
duties faithfully and acceptably. In November, 1899, he was elected treas- 
urer of Knox county, and his record was so eminently satisfactory that he 
was re-elected in 1901, serving for a period of four years. He has served 
almost continuously for fifteen years as a member of the Democratic county 
executive committee and he has always been prominent in the councils of 
his party. He has also been a frequent delegate to district, county and 
state conventions. After leaving the treasurer's office he was cashier of 
the Farmers and Merchants National Bank of Mt. Vernon for two years, 
giving the utmost satisfaction to patrons and stockholders. Since severing 
his connection with the bank he has devoted his attention to his farm and 
and other business interests. His place in Pleasant township consists of 
one hundred and eighty acres which is well improved and under a good state 
of cultivation. He keeps his farm well stocked with good grades of live 
stock of various kinds. 

Mr. Severns is a member of the Mt. Vernon board of review which 
is operated by the state tax commissioner, for a period of five years. He be- 
longs to the Masonic order and all the Masonic bodies, including the com- 
mandery. He also belongs to the Knights of Pythias and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. He and his family are members of the Methodist 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 609 

Episcopal church, he being one of the board of trustees and an active mem- 
ber in the church, also the Sunday school. His home is at No. 301 North 
Gay street and is prominent in the local social life, the family having been 
popular in all circles in which they move since coming to Mt. Vernon. 



ROLLIN C. MITCHELL. 

One of the well-known citizens of Mt. Vernon, Knox county, is 
Rollin C. Mitchell, who enjoys distinctive prestige among the enterprising 
men of this locality, having fought his way onward and upward in indus- 
trial circles, and in every relation of life his voice and influence have been 
on the side of right as he sees and understands the right. Like his worthy 
father before him, he has always been interested in every enterprise for 
the general welfare of the community and liberally supports every move- 
ment calculated to benefit his fellow men, and therefore enjoys the esteem 
of all who know him. 

Mr. Mitchell was bom on April 7, 1847, ^^ Chesterville, Knox county, 
now a part of Morrow county, Ohio. He was the son of William and Lucy 
(Brown) Mitchell, the father born near Fredericktown, July 15, 181 1. 
William Mitchell, grandfather of the subject, came to this countr}' from 
Pennsylvania about 1805, ^"^ ^^ the earliest pioneers, he having been com- 
missioned by the government as agent for government lands of this section 
of the Northwestern Territory, and here he spent the remainder of his 
life, dying at his home near Fredericktown, Knox county, in 1848. He is 
described as a brave man of strong characteristics. Thus the Mitchells have 
been well known in this locality for more than a century. William Mitchell, 
father of the subject, was reared in the pioneer forest home here and ob- 
tained a meager education in the old log school houses of his day. As a 
young man he learned the trade of ax maker, winning thereby the sobri- 
quet of "the ax maker," by which he was widely known, and it is said of him 
that he made a most excellent ax and that his axes felled more trees of Knox 
county than any other make. Most of his life was spent in this county, but 
the machine-made axes supplanting his business, he turned his attention to 
tool making and dressing, and for a number of years he sold machinery for 
the Cooper Company of Mt. Vernon, though he was known all his life as 
"the ax man.'* Soon after his marriage he moved to Illinois and was a 
resident in the same district in which Abraham Lincoln resided, and at one 



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6lO KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

time Lincoln won a lawsuit for Mr. Mitchell. The latter returned to Ohio 
in 1846 and located at Chesterville, where the subject was bom, later moved 
to Centerburg, this county, where the family lived for about ten years, and 
in the spring of 1864 moved to Mt. Vernon, where he spent the remainder 
of his life, his death occurring on December 9, 1909, at the advanced age of 
ninety-eight years and five months, his wife having preceded him to the 
silent land in 1878. William Mitchell was active in the work of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church, having been a class leader and exhorter, a devout 
churchman, and he was an acquaintance and on friendly terms with many 
of the church dignitaries of his time. He was a man of exemplary char- 
acter, charitable and hospitable. 

Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. William Mitchell, three of 
whom died in infancy, the other five growing to maturity, namely: Naomi, 
deceased, was the wife of Henry A. Hyatt; Emma L., also deceased, was 
the wife of Captain Harrison; Stephen Lewis Y. was a captain in the Union 
army during the Civil war and breveted major at the close of the war; Rollin 
C, of this sketch; Sarah is deceased; Luella lives in Mt. Vernon. 

Rollin C. Mitchell was educated in the schools of Centerburg and Mt. 
Vernon, and when a young man he learned the jewel-maker's trade with 
Levi Stone, of Mt. Vernon, for whom he worked for some time, later work- 
ing in Mt. Gilead and Coshocton, being very skilled in this line of endeavor. 

Mr. Mitchell was married on November 22, 1871, to Perliette O. 
StauflFer, daughter of Joseph and Deborah (Brown) Stauffer, her father 
having been a merchant in Mt. Vernon for many years, building up an 
excellent business, which is still continued by his son, Almon F. Stauffer. Six 
children have been lx)rn to Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell, namely: Clifton A. 
lives in Columbus, Ohio; Florence D. married Halt>ert M. Eggleston, of 
Mt. Vernon; LuNylla married John Whitford, of Mt. Vernon; Harry O. 
lives in Mt. Vernon; Lena A. married Vincent Welker, of Gambier, Ohio; 
Lucy M. married Phillip J. Brereton, of Mt. Vernon. 

In March, 1872, Mr. Mitchell engaged with Mr. Stauffer, his father- 
in-law. as a clerk, with whom he remained for a period of twenty-three 
years, assisting very materially in building up a lucrative business. Then 
he went into business for himself, men's and women's furnishings, under 
the firm name of R. C. Mitchell, Son & Company. This continued success- 
fully for six years, during which time he enjoyed an excellent trade with the 
town and surrounding country. He then traveled for two and one-half 
years for the Patric Furnace Company of Springfield, Ohio. During the 
five years following this he kept books for B. E. Salesbury. Since 1908 he 
has been in charge of the third ward school building. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 6ll 

Politically, Mr. Mitchell is a Republican and he has always been active 
in public matters. For four years he served as city treasurer. He and his 
wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and are active in 
church work. Fraternally, he is a member of the Masonic order and the 
Knights and Ladies of Honor, his wife being a member of the latter also. 
He also belongs to the Independent Order of Foresters and the Ben Hur 
lodge. The pleasant home of the family is located at No. 1 13 East Lamartine 
street, Mt. Vernon. 



DR. JOSEPH WENGER. 

The science of osteopathy has gained so rapidly in universal favor dur- 
ing the past few years that it is safe to say that it is only in very remote 
sections of the Union that it is not known, and as it is better understood and 
its praiseworthy results more apparent it has come rapidly into favor, the 
plausableness of its theory appealing to the contemplative mind readily, and 
so those who have set themselves the task of practicing it are now finding 
a fertile soil, as it were, and their offices are, as a rule, crowded with patients, 
even in the smaller cities. This science has a very able exponent in the per- 
son of Dr. Joseph Wenger, of Mt. Vernon, Knox county, who has within 
a comparatively short time built up a very satisfactory practice. Doctor 
Wenger was born August 17, 1854, in Adair county, Missouri, and he is 
the son of John and Elizabeth (Hoofer) Wenger. The father was born 
in Germany and was brought to the United States when three years of age, 
the family locating in Pennsylvania, later coming to Ohio, thence to Mis- 
souri in 1850. The Doctor's mother came from Switzerland, when she was 
ten years of age, with her parents, who settled first in Missouri, where she 
grew to womanhood, met and married John Wenger. They are both de- 
ceased. 

The son, Joseph Wenger, spent his youth on the home farm which he 
worked during the summer months and attended the district schools in the 
winter time, and he remained under his parental roof-tree until his marriage, 
November 26, 1874, to Eliza A. Bragg, daughter of William E. and Martha 
(Murphy) Bragg. This family came from the state of Virginia to Ken- 
tucky in an early day, Mrs. Wenger s father being born in the latter state. 
Later the family moved to Illinois, thence to Missouri. The maternal an- 
cestry of Mrs. Wenger, the Murphys, came from Ireland. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bragg were married in Missouri and there spent their lives on a farm in Adair 
county. 



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6l2 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

Eleven children have been born to Dr. and Mrs. Wenger, five of whom 
are deceased. Those living are Alta M., Alfred O., Everett L., Clinton P., 
Ona M., Stella A., all of whom are at home. The deceased children were 
William Henry, Clarence, Lawrence Norman, Aaron Austin, Tilda Ethel. 

After his marriage, Doctor Wenger followed farming in Adair county, 
Missouri, for several years, and in 1899 ^^ S^^^ "P agricultural pursuits, al- 
though he had a good start, and turned his attention to the study of osteop- 
athy at the college at Kirkville, Missouri, where he made a splendid record 
and from which institution he was graduated in 1901. He located for the 
practice of his profession soon afterward at Warrensburg, Missouri, and 
remained there one year. In January, 1902, he located in Mt. Vernon. Ohio, 
and he has been successfully engaged in the practice of osteopathy here ever 
since, having built up a large and lucrative practice, which is steadily grow- 
ing. He keeps thoroughly up to date in everything pertaining to his pro- 
fession and he has a neat, well arranged and modernly-equipped office in 
the Republican-Neivs building at No. 19 E^st Vine street. 

Politically, the Doctor is a Democrat in national aflfairs, but he votes 
the local ticket independently. He has never held or been a seeker of office, 
preferring to give his undivided attention to his profession. Fraternally, 
he is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and the Maccabees. 
He and his entire family are meml^ers of the Christian church and they are 
active in church and Sunday school work. They have a very pleasant home 
at No. no North McKinzie street, Mt. Vernon. The Doctor is an intelli- 
gent, agreeable and progressive gentleman, interested in the improvement of 
his city and community and he has won a wide circle of friends since lo- 
cating here. 



6eorge S. HARTER. 

Among the successful self-made men of Mt. Vernon, Knox county, 
whose eflforts and influence have contributed to the material upbuilding and 
general good of the respective communities which they have honored by 
their citizenship, the gentleman of whom the biographer writes in this con- 
nection occupies a conspicuous place. For many years he was one of the 
leading educators of this section of Ohio, later won a prominent place in 
the field of journalism and at present he is one of our valued public officials. 
He is a veteran of the great war between the states, in which he proved his 
loyalty to the government. Being ambitious from the first, but surrounded 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 613 

by none too favorable environment, his early youth was not any too promis- 
ing, but he accepted the discouraging situation without a murmur and reso- 
lutely facing the future, gradually surmounted the difficulties in his way and 
in due time rose to a prominent position in the body politic, besides winning 
thjc confidence and esteem of those with whom he has been brought into con- 
tact, and today he stands as one of the representative citizens of this favored 
section of the Buckeye state. 

Mr. Harter was bom on November i8, 1845, ^" ^^^' Madison, Darke 
county, Ohio, and is the son of Elias and Gertrude (Biddle) Harter. The 
father's people came from Rockingham county, Virginia, moving from there 
to Berks county, Pennsylvania. Grandfather David Harter came to Darke 
county, Ohio, with the pioneers about 1818, bringing his family into the 
wilderness. He was a Dunkard minister and a man of great prominence 
among the early settlers. Elias Harter was a blacksmith by trade, a land- 
owner and a man of affairs. During the Civil war he went to the front and 
rose to the rank of captain in the Union army, serving with distinction. He 
is remembered as a man of remarkable memory and a close student of nature. 
He was well informed on general topics. Politically, he was a Republican 
and an abolitionist in the early days, and, while he was always greatly in- 
terested in public affairs, he was never an office seeker. His death occurred 
in 1898 at his home on the farm near New Madison, Ohio, his widow sur- 
viving until 1899. They were the parents of eight children, five of whom are 
yet living. 

George S. Harter, of this sketch, grew up in the village of New Madi- 
son and he received his education in the public schools there, working on the 
home farm during the summer months. Although young in years at the out- 
break of the Civil war, he enlisted in defense of the government on August 8, 
1862, in Company H, One Hundred and Tenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in 
which he gallantly served until the close of the war, almost three years. For 
meritorious conduct he was advanced to the rank of corporal. His regiment 
saw much hard service. At the battle of the Wilderness Mr. Harter was 
taken prisoner, May 6, 1864, and was confined in various Confederate pris- 
ons, landing in Andersonville on May 24th of that year, and he experienced 
all the horrors of that terrible place. Later he was taken to Florence, South 
Carolina, and was exchanged on December 6, 1864, and passed out of 
Charleston Harbor, by old Fort Sumter, to a government transport and again 
joined his company and regiment just a short time prior to Lee's surrender. 
He was mustered out of service on June 27, 1865, while' in camp near Wash- 
ington City, and reached home on July 3, 1865. 



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6l4 KNOX CXDUNTY, OHIO. 

After leaving the army Mr. Harter entered the Heidelberg Preparatory 
School at Tiffin, Ohio, where he spent three years; while there he taught 
school at different periods and prosecuted his studies. Later he entered 
Adelbert College at Cleveland in the fall of 1871 and was graduated from 
that institution with the class of 1875, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, 
and' later he was given the degree of Master of Arts. Thus exceptionally 
well equipped for life's duties, he turned his attention to teaching. He be- 
came principal of the Greenville high school, successfully filling this position 
for five years, then he was senior high school teacher at Dayton for one year, 
then went to the Sidney (Ohio) high school, w^here he remained five years. 
The next seven years he spent at Celina, Ohio, as superintendent of public 
schools. Although he has established a state-wide reputation as an educator, 
giving eminent satisfaction wherever he worked, he finally tired of the school 
room and turned his attention to journalism and became editor and pubhsher 
of the Celina Observer, continuing in that work for three years. In 1895 he 
came to Mt. Vernon and here he has continued to reside. He continued in 
the newspaper business one year after coming to Knox county. 

Mr. Harter is a stalwart Republican and he has always been active in 
party affairs and while in newspaper work he did much for the success of the 
party in his community. In 1900 he was elected mayor of Mt. Vernon, serv- 
ing one term of two years, during which time he did much for the permanent 
good of this city and won the admiration of all classes by his commendable 
course. In 1905 he was appointed to fill an unexpired term of justice of the 
peace, serving thus two years. In 1907, having made a most satisfactor}' 
record in this office, he was elected to the same for a full term of four years 
and he is still incumbent of this office, the duties of which he has discharged 
with an ability and fidelity that has reflected much credit upon himself and 
to the satisfaction of all concerned. His decisions have been characterized 
by fairness and they have met with few reverses at the hands of higher tri- 
bunals. While living in Shelby county, Ohio, he served as county school ex- 
aminer for four years. He holds a high school life teacher's certificate, to 
teach all branches. 

Mr. Harter was married on October 18, 1877, ^^ Flora Meeker, daugh- 
ter of James and (Hetzler) Meeker, of Greenville, a prominent 

family in the public life of that city. To the subject and wife five children 
have been born, namely: Lowell M. is married and is engaged in the news- 
paper business at Canton; Marian married L. V. Armentrout, of Louisville, 
Kentucky; James lives at Three Rivers, Michigan; George A. lives in Mt. 
Vernon; one child died in infancv. 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 615 

Mr. Harter belongs to the Masonic order and Joe Hooker Post No. 25, 
Grand Army of the Republic. He served as adjutant of the post for several 
years and he is the present commander. He and his family are members of 
the Presbyterian church and are active in church and Sunday school work. 
The pleasant family home is at No. 1 1 1 East Lamartine street, Mt. Vernon. 
It is modemly furnished and in it may be seen an excellent library where the 
subject is wont to spend a great deal of time, 'losing himself in other men's 
minds" and keeping acquainted with current topics and the w^orld's best lit- 
erature. He has always been a student and is therefore a scholarly and cul- 
tured gentleman, genial, obliging and hospitable, a man whom it is a pleasure 
to meet. 



JOSEPH Mccormick. 

It is not only pleasant, but profitable as well, to study the life history of 
such a worthy gentleman as he whose name forms the heading of this bio- 
graphical memoir, the late Joseph McCormick, of Mt. Vernon, Knox county, 
for in it we find evidence of traits of character that cannot help but make for 
success in the life of any one who directs his eflforts, as he did, along proper 
paths with persistency and untiring zeal, toward a worthy goal, having had as 
his g^iide through life, upright principles. 

The ancestors of the McCormick family are of ancient Scotch lineage, 
traced in an unbroken line through the progenitor of this branch of the 
American family, James McCormick, whose name is signed to an address to 
William and Mary, dated July 29, 1689, ^"^ their coat of arms denotes 
Crusader ancestry and military fortitude. The McCormick name has become 
closely identified with many important enterprises and much that made for 
material, civic and moral progress in this country as well as in Scotland and 
Ireland. 

Joseph McCormick was born E>ecember 21, 1828, in Perr>' county, Ohio, 
the son of Samuel McCormick and Malvina (Pence- Albright) McCormick. 
The subject's father was lx>rn in Pennsylvania and the mother in Virginia, 
and they came to Ohio with the early pioneers and the family moved to 
Seneca county, this state, in 1829, where the father became a large land 
owner and interested in manufacturing; however, he gave his attention 
principally to his extensive land interests in the vicinity of Tiffin. 

Joseph McCormick, of this review, spent his boyhood amid pioneer 
conditions. He studied designing and learned the cabinet-maker's trade at 

(40) 



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6l6 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Tiffin, becoming a designer of much ability and his products were eagerly 
sought for by eastern manufacturers. He came to Mt. Vernon in 1849 ^^^ 
was married on January 12, 1854, to Elizabeth McDowell, daughter of Daniel 
and Patience (Eaton-Elliott) McDowell, of Mt. Vernon, both early pioneer 
families of the Buckeye state; in 1848 Daniel McDowell was postmaster at 
Mt. Vernon and a prominent citizen in the early days. 

Ten children were born to Mr. and Mrs. McCormick, six of whom are 
now living. 

Up to the time of his death, January 26, 191 1, Mr. McCormick was 
actively engaged in mercantile business, covering a period of sixty-two years 
of continuous business in Mt. Vernon, a record not attained by any other 
resident of this city, and he was successful, for he was an honest and obliging 
gentleman whom everybody trusted and respected. Mr. McCormick was 
always a loyal Republican, and while he was never active in party affairs, he 
was interested and well informed on all public matters. He belonged to the 
First Congregational church, which he joined in March, 1867, and was a 
devout churchman. Being of a conservative disposition, he performed his 
duties as a broad-minded citizen in a quiet, unobtrusive way. The business 
he conducted so long is now continued by his son, William Edwin McCor- 
mick. 

The family home has long been known as one of wholesome social 
atmosphere and good cheer, and no family in the county has stood higher 
than the.McCormicks. 



JOHN COOPER. 



It is both gratifying and profitable to enter record concerning such a 
man as he whose name appears at the head of this life record, and in the 
following outline sufficient will be said to indicate the forceful individuality, 
initiative power and sterling character which have had such a decided influence 
in making their possessor a leader in enterprises requiring the highest order 
of business talent, and to gain for him wide publicity among those who shape 
and direct policies of more than ordinary consequence in Knox county and 
who ranks among the most representative of her citizens. 

John Cooper, well known real estate and business man of Mt. Vernon, 
Ohio, was born three miles northwest of this city, on May 30, 1824, and his 
long, useful and industrious life has been spent in this vicinity, whose interests 
he has ever had at heart and sought to promote, and which he has witnessed 
develop from the pioneer stage to one of the foremost sections of the great 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 617 

Buckeye state. His youth was spent on the farm of his parents, Gary and 
Elizabeth (Ruple) Cooper, sterling early settlers of this vicinity, they having 
corae from Washington county, Pennsylvania, and settled in the woods in 
Morris township, Knox county, in 1811. There they erected a rude log 
cabin, began clearing a farm, and, by hard work and economy, became very 
comfortably established in due course of time. This country was then wild 
and sparsely settled, still being the abode of Indians and many varieties of 
wild game. These parents had a family of nine children, six sons and three 
daughters, namely: James, born February 26, 1804, died in 1834; Phoebe, 
bom February i, 1806, died April 15, 1854; Ann, born July 13, 1808, died 
September 14, 1832; Charles, born February 2, 181 1, died February 7, 1901 ; 
Elias, bom February 26, 1813, died August 16, 1850; Lewis, born May 20, 
1818, died August 18, 1845; John, of this review; Nancy, born August i, 
1827, died April 17, 191 1, the immediate subject of this sketch being the 
only surviving member of the family. The father of these children was 
born on July 29, 1781, and died April 20, 1831 ; his wife was bom March 11, 
1784, and died on December 25, 1868; both are buried in the Mt. Vernon 
cemetery. They were devout Presbyterians and they reared their children in 
that faith. 

John Cooper, of this review, had little opportunity to obtain an educa- 
tion, but got what he could in the log cabin schools of his district during the 
winter months, until he was fourteen years of age, when he was bound to a 
coppersmith and as an apprentice he thus mastered the trade in three years, 
buying his unexpired term when he was seventeen years of age and he en- 
gaged in business for himself on the west side of the public square in Mt. 
Vernon. Two years later he engaged in the stove and sheet iron business in 
what was known as the old market house on the square. He was married on 
March 17, 1844, to Eliza Murphy, daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth 
(Hanna) Murphy, an early pioneer family who came from Washington 
county, Pennsylvania. This union resulted in the birth of three children : 
John E., deceased; Hugh N., deceased; and Ella, who. resides with her father. 
The wife and mother passed away on January 26, 1883. 

Mr. Cooper continued in business in the old market house, which he 
had purchased, for several years. In 1848 he erected a building on the east 
side of the square where the Banner newspaper is now located, and there he 
continued the stove and tin business. In 1854 he engaged in the foundry 
business with his brother Charles and he began the manufacture of stoves, 
which grew to include the manufacture of plows, farm machinery, portsblt 
engines, grist mill machinery, this really being Mt. Vernon's first manufac- 
turing industry and it did much to advertise the town abroad, the plant grow- 



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6l8 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

ing to large proportions and employing many men, the products finding a 
wide and ready market. The partnership with his brother Charles continued 
until 1869, when John Cooper withdrew and purchased the General C. P. 
Buckingham Foundry at the foot of Main street, and he continued that busi- 
ness along the same lines as when with his brother, enjoying a very liberal 
patronage. Mr. Cooper managed the sales department and spent considerable 
time on the road, selling goods direct to the purchaser, and he built up a very 
satisfactory business, which was continued by him until 1893, when the 
Buckingham plant' was destroyed by fire, all except the foundry. A portion 
.of the plant was rebuilt and business continued until 1895, when Mr. 
Cooper sold his interest, since which time he has l^een engaged in the real 
estate and fire insurance business and has built up a vtry satisfactory patron- 
age. He maintains his office in his own building, the substantial Cooper 
block, on the east side of the square. 

In politics Mr. Cooper was originally an abolitionist and from the for- 
mation of the Republican party he has l)een a loyal supporter of the same, 
but has never been an office seeker. He was a warm personal friend of 
President Lincoln, and it is a well known fact of inside history that Mr. Lin- 
coln named May 30, Mr. Coopers birthday, as Decoration day. He was 
also a friend of Hayes, Garfield, McKinley and many other prominent men 
of the party. He was long an intimate friend of John Sherman. During the 
latter half of his life he has been a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and he is the oldest member and the oldest past grand master of the 
same in Knox county. Religiously he is a member of the Congregational 
church, in fact is the oldest member of the local church; he has long been 
active in church work. He has always been a busy man of aflfairs and yet in 
his old age he maintains a keen interest in and a close touch with all business 
and public matters. He has been a great influence for progress and general 
good in the community where he has for so many years been a prominent 
factor and where he is so universally esteemed. 

In his active days as a manufacturer, Mr. Cooper had considerable of a 
national reputation and did a great deal of work for the United States gov- 
ernment, having put in, among other things, the first steel and glass patent 
model cases in the patent office building at Washington. The cast iron light- 
house at Hell Gate was built by him, as were many other lighthouses in the 
country. The government also bought of him a number of saw mill outfits 
for use in clearing their Indian reservations. 

Mr. Cooper was instrumental in securing the State Sanatorium for Tu- 
berculosis just outside of Mt. Vernon, as the site he labored for so success- 
fully was finally selected as being the finest in the state. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 619 

JOHN WADHAMS RUSSELL, M. D. 

No history of the medical profession in Knox county would be complete 
without a biographical notice of the physician whose name heads this article. 
The following was written of this distinguished physician for the Journal of 
the American Medical Association in August, 1887, by Dr. F. C. Larimore, 
of Mt. Vernon, Ohio, who is in a position to give an unbiased view concerning 
Dr. Russell. His estimate of him is as follows: 

John Wadhams Russell of Mt. Vernon. Ohio, was born in Canaan, 
Litchfield county, Connecticut, on January 28, 1804. His father. Hon. 
Stephen Russell, was repeatedly elected a member of the Connecticut Legis- 
lature, and his grandfather, Jonathan Russell, commanded a brig under Gen- 
eral Lafayette's letters of marque in 1778. Doctor Russell's mother was 
Sarah Wadhams, of Goshen, Connecticut. His education until his thirteenth 
year was received at the common schools of Litchfield, whither his father 
removed in 1808. Then he was sent to Morris Academy, and under Rev. 
Truman Marsh pursued his studies and was prepared for and admitted to 
Hamilton College in 1821. He pursued his classical studies with the Rev. 
Mr. Langdon, of Bethlehem, Connecticut, one year, as his impaired health 
would permit, and in the fall of 1823 went South. He took charge of an 
academy at Red Bank, Colleton district. South Carolina, six months and 
then commenced his professional studies with Doctor Sheridan, a scientific 
and noble-hearted Quaker. Returning to Connecticut, he attended the medi- 
cal lectures at Yale College one course, and then going to Pittsfield, Massachu- 
setts, there attended the lectures in Berkshire Medical College. Subsequently, 
going to Philadelphia, he was a private pupil of Dr. George McClellan, and 
was graduated from Jefferson Medical College in 1827. Returning to Litch- 
field, he there began the practice' of his profession, and remained there one 
year, during which time he delivered a course of lectures on anatomy and 
physiology to a private class of young men. In 1828 he removed to Ohio 
and began practice at Sandusky City, where he remained but a few months, 
when he moved to Mount Vernon, Knox county. He was a delegate to and 
member of the Centennial International Medical Congress which met in Phila- 
delphia in 1876. At this meeting of the International Medical Congress Dr. 
S. D. Gross said: **It gives me much pleasure to introduce to my medical 
brethren my esteemed friend and classmate, Doctor Russell, whose extreme 
modesty alone prevented him from l)eing the leading surgeon of the land." 

In 1828 Doctor Russell married Eliza, daughter of the Hon. William 
Beebe, of Litchfield, Connecticut. She died in 1871, having been the mother 



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620 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

of five children. In 1872 Doctor Russell married, in San Francisco, Ellen M. 
Brown, daughter of Joseph Brown, Esq. She died October 14, 1879. 

Doctor Russell was a man of indefatigable industry. During his life 
he probably performed more physical and mental labor than the majority of 
his contemporaries, in and out of the profession. His work did not begin 
with the rising or close with the setting sun, and the day usually allotted to 
rest found him actively engaged. In his early practice he visited his patients 
on horseback. While on a professional trip near Gambier in 1836 his horse 
fell on the ice and injured his knee joint, which resulted in false anchylosis 
and compelled him to use a crutch afterwards. For a like disability many 
would have abandoned an active practice, but with him it had no effect, only 
to intensify his zeal and change the mode of his travel. Mules were called 
into requisition, and with two of these animals and a carriage he scaled the 
hills of Knox and adjoining counties for half a centur>'. During the sixty 
years of his professional life, his instruction was sought by not less than three 
hundred young men preparing to enter the medical profession. He was a 
most capable and thorough office preceptor. He imparted instruction to his 
pupils by recitations, dissections, demonstrations and oral instructions, and 
by his own exemplary conduct taught them medical ethics. He elicited the 
profound admiration and resi:)ect of his pupil's, and inspired them with en- 
thusiasm in their studies. In his journeys to his patients he would take a 
student and his text-book, conduct the recitation en route, and when darkness 
or other cause intervened no time would be lost, for now came the memor- 
able quiz over past work, and for which he was truly famous. That his office 
was an uncomfortable place for a lazy student, and that the Doctor had no 
patience with a man who would not work his brain is shown by an extract 
from a letter to the late Dr. William Morrow Beach, of London, Ohio : "For 
fifty-nine years it has been my happy lot to serve the afflicted conscientiously, 
faithfully, and I wish I might add judiciously. This I cannot always say. I 
have prayed for wisdom, and would advise the same to my juniors. The 
great sin in our profession is indolence. A man is responsible not only to 
do as well as he knows, but to use his faculties to know what to do." 

It was in general surgery that he took most interest and found most 
pleasure. He regarded anatomical knowledge as the true basis of all success 
and skill in surgery. Living in a country where it is necessary to be a general 
practitioner in medicine and surgery, he performed most of the so-called 
capital operations, such as lithotomy, herniotomy, and all the most important 
amputations, except that of the hip-joint, and many of the more delicate 
operations, as that for cataract, etc., and with almost uniform success. He was 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 62 1 

careful to keep pace with the advances in medicine. In all matters he faith- 
fully followed his convictions of duty regardless of the sacrifice of self which 
such a course might require. He was tendered the professorship of surgery 
in several medical colleges, but declined them all, preferring to remain in 
private practice. He was an active Christian, ever ready to perform those 
duties which the love of Christ devolved upon him. He had an hypertrophied 
prostate for eighteen years, the pain and other resulting inconveniences of 
which he bore with fortitude and without a murmur. Retention of urine and 
uraemia caused his death on March 22, 1887, at the advanced age of eighty- 
three years. He died as many had predicted, "in the harness," having pre- 
scril^ed for patients up to within forty-eight hours of his death. 

F. C. Larimore. 



SOLON B. ACKLEY. 



One of the progressive young agriculturists of southeastern Knox county 
is Solon B. Ackley. Without much outside assistance, the success he has 
achieved is due largely to his own efforts. Strong determination, persistence 
in the pursuit of an honorable purpose, unflagging energy and keen discrim- 
ination — ^these are the salient features in his career and his life stands in 
unmistakable evidence that success is not a matter of genius, as held by some, 
but is the outcome of earnest and well directed effort. 

Mr. Ackley was born on August 30, 1873, on a farm in Qay township, 
Knox county. He is the son of John and Martha (Woodruff) Ackley. The 
father was bom on a farm in Licking county and the mother in Knox 
county. Grandfather Philetus Ackley came to Knox county from Licking 
county in an early day and settled in Clay township in 1840 and here he 
developed a good farm. The father of the subject also spent his life en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits and he became a large landowner and one of 
the influential men of his community. Politically, he was a Democrat, but he 
was not a man who sought the emoluments of public positions, preferring to 
lead a home life. His death occurred on April 3, 1902, his wife having pre- 
ceded him to the silent land on September 19, 1891. Both are buried in the 
Presbyterian cemetery at Martinsburg. 

Five children were bom to Mr. and Mrs. John Ackley, namely: Eva, 
deceased; Olive married Frank Penn, of Clay township; Lucilla, deceased; 
Solon B., of this review ; Cora is single and is living with the subject. 

Solon B. Ackley was reared on the home farm, where he worked during 



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622 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

his boyhood days, and he received his education in the country district schools 
and the schools of Martinsburg. He has remained unmarried and has al- 
ways devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits. He has an excellent farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres, which he has brought up to a high state of 
improvement and cultivation and on which he is successfully engaged in gen- 
eral farming and stock raising. Nature has signally favored him in that 
there are six producing gas wells on his land, which are sources of no small 
part of his annual income. 

Mr. Ackley is not a member of any church, though he is a supporter of 
the local congregations and, in fact, lends his aid to all movements having as 
their object the betterment of the locality in any way. 

Mr. Ackley was one of the promoters of the Knox-Licking Telephone 
Company, and was president of the company for some time, its large success 
being due in no small measure to his able management and judicious council. 
He has been active in its affairs from the first. He is a public-spirited citizen, 
as already indicated, and is an especial advocate of goc.d roads. He finds 
recreation in his automobile and other outdoor diversions. He is a good mixer 
and is well liked by all who know him. 



CURTIS ELMER McMANNIS. 

Among the citizens of Knox county who have forged their way to the 
front by sheer force of will and individual merit rather than by the influence 
and material assistance of others, no better or worthier example than that of 
Curtis Elmer McMannis, the able and popular superintendent of the Knox 
county infirmary, could be found. He is a man of excellent judgment, pro- 
gressive ideas, high character and straightforward business principles, which 
account for his uniform success. Being thus careful in his calculations, re- 
sourceful in his dealings and eminently honorable in his relations with others, 
people have always reposed confidence in his word and his integrity has ever 
been above criticism. 

Mr. McMannis was bom on January 6, 1869. on a farm three miles east 
of Mt. Vernon, in Monroe township. He is the son of Lenhart and Rel>ecca 
Jane (Laffarrie) McMannis, the father a native of Fayette county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and the mother of Monroe township, Knox county, Ohio. The father 
was about seven years of age when he accompanied his parents to this county, 
and here he grew up and devoted his life to farming, becoming a man of 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 623 

influence in his community, and here he and his wife still reside, engaged in 
farming in Monroe township. 

The son, Curtis E., spent his young manhood days with his father on 
a rented farm, where he assisted with the general work, and he received his 
education in the common schools of his vicinity. He is the eldest of a family 
of eight children. His parents needing his help in raising the family, he was 
compelled to go to work as soon as old enough, consequently his early school- 
ing was somewhat neglected. He remained under his parental roof-tree until 
he was twenty years of age, when he engaged with C. A. Young just east of 
Mt. Vernon for farm work, remaining with Mr. Young and his son for a 
period of twenty years, working by the month. When he was first employed 
there he missed only three days during eleven years and three months from 
his regular work on the farm and that was the occasion of his wedding, and 
during all this time he slept away from the farm but three nights. This is 
indeed a most remarkable record and would be hard to beat. 

Mr. McMannis was married on December 31, 1891, to Angie Houck, 
daughter of William and Rachael (Dial) Houck, of College township, this 
county. This union has resulted in the birth of one daughter, Orpha B., who 
is at home with her parents. 

After his marriage Mr. McMannis continued to work for Mr. Young 
by the month, living on his farm until January, 1909, when he was appointed 
superintendent' of the Knox county infirmary and infirmary farm and he is 
still serving in that capacity, his wife being matron of the institution. He has 
charge of the farm of three hundred and twenty-seven acres for the county 
besides the infirmary institution with its sixty inmates. He engages in gen- 
eral farming and stock raising of all kinds and has met with great success. 

Most of the products of the farm go toward the maintenance of the 
infirmary. Mr. McMannis has placed the farm under a high state of culti- 
vation and improvement and his services in this connection have reflected 
much credit upon himself and to the satisfaction of all concerned, proving 
the wise judgment of those who placed him in charge here. He is recognized 
as one of the most progressive, thorough and painstaking farmers in the 
county, and his management of the inmates is in every way commendable. 

Politically, Mr. McMannis is'a Democrat and he has always been inter- 
ested in public matters and has been active in local aflfairs. He was trustee of 
Monroe township for eight years, filling the office very worthily indeed. He 
has been a frequent delegate to party conventions. He is a member of the 
Knights of the Golden Eagle and the Knights of the Maccabees. His wife is 
a very competent associate in the management of the infirmary and a woman 



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624 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

of fine qualities and tact and her advice and encouragement have been of great 
help to the subject, and they are both held in high esteem by all who know 
them. 



BURCHARD BLAINE FERENBAUGH. 

The life of the subject of this review has been such as to bear aloft the 
high standard which has been maintained by his father, one of. the sterling 
pioneer residents of Knox county and whose life was singularly noble, up- 
right and useful, one over which falls no shadow of wrong in thought, word 
or deed. Such was the type of men who laid the foundation and aided in the 
development of this favored section of the great Buckeye commonwealth, 
and to their memories will ever be paid a tribute of reverence and gratitude 
by those who have profited by their well directed endeavors and appreciated 
the lessons of their lives. Burchard Blaine Ferenbaugh, one of the most suc- 
cessful of the younger generations of agriculturists of Union township, is in 
every respect a worthy son of a worthy sire, having proved to be signally true 
to every trust reposed in him and keeping untarnished the bright escutcheon 
of the honored family name. 

Mr. Ferenbaugh was bom on September 13, 1878, in Harrison town- 
ship, Knox county. He is the son of Leo and Amanda (Doup) Ferenbaugh, 
the father l>om on the farm in Union township, Knox county, Ohio, where 
the son resides ; the mother was also a native of this county. Here they grew 
to maturity, received their educational training in the common schools and 
were married. The father devoted his life principally to the farm implement 
business, with headquarters in Buckeye City, and was an extensive and suc- 
cessful business man, having enjoyed a large trade with a wide territory. He 
was active in public matters, and a Prohibitionist in politics, taking much 
more than a passing interest in his party. He served as a member of the 
township school board for a number of years. Leo Ferenbaugh was born on 
October 20, 1843, ^^^ his death occurred on March 25, 1904. He was the son 
of Fidela and Eliza (Draper) Ferenbaugh. His father emigrated to America 
from Germany in 1830, and was engaged for a time in the manufacture and 
sale of brass clocks. I^ter he was an extensive farmer and fruit grower. 
The father of the subject had two brothers, Joseph and Frank, and a sister, 
Mary, all of whom are living in Union township, this county. The father was 
among the first to sell reapers and mowers in Knox county. He was married 
to Amanda Doup, of Jelloway, whose death occurred on July 19, 1882. This 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 625 

union resulted in the birth of three children, Burchard Blaine, of this sketch; 
Luella Lester and Thomas Ludlow, all of whom live in Union township on 
the old home farm. The father was married a second time, March 23, 1893, 
to Rachel Alice Wheeler, of West Bedford, Coshocton county, Ohio, who is 
still living. Leo Ferenbaugh was widely known and held in the highest 
esteem by all. He was a man of strong convictions and unimpeachable hon- 
esty, far-seeing business ability and a safe counselor. He was always active 
in questions that pertained to his community, liberal with his time and money 
for the promotion of moral causes. He held various public positions, such as 
a member of the board of education. 

Burchard B. Ferenbaugh, of this sketch, was reared on the home farm, 
and he attended the district schools when a boy, later the Danville high 
school and then the State University at Columbus for two years. He had 
long entertained an ambition to enter the legal profession and with this end in 
view he went to the Law School of the University of Chicago, where he made 
an excellent record and from which institution he was graduated in 1907. 
Before going to college he taught school three years in the public schools of 
Gambier. After being admitted to the bar he located in Chicago, where he 
remained one year, and upon the death of his father he returned to the old 
home for the purpose of managing the farm and here he has since remained, 
successfully carrying on the work inaugurated by the elder Ferenbaugh, this 
place having been in the family's ix)ssession ever since the grandfather, Fidela 
Ferenbaugh, secured it upon his arrival from the old country in 1830. and 
they intend keeping it in the family. Although the subject has been kept busy 
looking after the farm, he has found time to continue the practice of the law 
and has enjoyed a good business in this line and has taken a high place at 
the Knox county bar, having met with uniform success as a counselor and ad- 
vocate He has continued his studies and has kept well abreast of the times in 
his profession. He has shown a profound knowledge of jurisprudence and 
is a careful, conscientious and painstaking worker, sparing no pains to secure 
what is right for his client. Politically, he is a Democrat and has always been 
active in public matters and a frequent delegate. to party conventions. Frater- 
nally, he is a Mason, belonging to Antioc Lodge at Danville. 

Mr. Ferenbaugh has never married. He possesses a social nature and 
kindly attitude to those about him. and has won the respect and confidence of 
everyone. He has been very successful, being known as a careful business 
man and one whose integrity of purpose is beyond question. He is a very 
busy man and but few moments pass that do not see him busily engaged with 
the affairs of life. 



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626 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

JACOB MITCHAEL BRYANT. 

It will always be a badge of honor in this country to have it known that 
a person's father, or even his uncle, enlisted in the service of the country 
when the great rebellion broke out, to assist in saving the Union and to eradi- 
cate slavery from our soil. Just as to this day we boast that our grandfather 
or great-grandfather fought in the Revolution to gain independence, or car- 
ried a musket in the war of 1812 to protect our rights on the ocean, so the 
descendants of the gallant soldiers who fought during the Rebellion to save 
the honor of the Stars and Stripes will boast through the coming centuries of 
the bravery and self-sacrifice of their fathers or other relatives. And this is 
as it should be. Slavery was wrong, and although the war was for the sal- 
vation of the Union, it was made the medium at a later stage to free the slaves 
and wipe from our flag the last vestige of reproach. It is a pleasure to write 
of the career of Jacob Mitchael Bryant, well known citizen of Fredericktown. 
Knox county, who was one of the '*boys in blue" who went forth to die on 
the field or in the no less dreadful fever camp, if need be, for the salvation of 
the country. 

Mr. Bryant was born in Wayne township, this county, on October 18, 
1837, o" ^ farm four miles southwest of Fredericktown. He is the son of 
William and Mariah L. Bryant; the father came from New Jersey in 1804 
and the mother's people from Virginia some years later. Grandfather James 
Bryant was a large landowner and was active in the affairs of the early pio- 
neers. The father of the subject devoted his life to farming and he stood 
high with the people of his community. 

Jacob M. Bryant has spent all his life on the old home farm and here he 
still resides, having kept the old place under a high state of improvement and 
cultivation. He received his education in the country district schools. He 
was married in January, 1867, to Jennie Dickey, daughter of Samuel and 
Elizabeth Dickey, a highly respected Wayne township family, both parents 
having died a number of years ago. 

One son has been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Bryant, William P., who is 
married and is living at home, assisting his father w^ith the management of 
the place, which consists of two hundred acres of as good land as the town- 
ship can lx)ast, and which has been so skillfully managed as to retain its ori- 
ginal fertility. In connection with general farming Mr. Bryant has long 
been widely known as a dealer in fine horses for the eastern market and no 
small part of his annual income is derived from this source. He has always 
been a lover of a good horse and no better judge of horses could be found in 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 627 

his locality. Young Bryant is also something of a horseman and takes much 
interest in this phase of their work. They buy in Indiana, Illinois, Missouri 
and Iowa as well as Ohio, and bring them here. They formerly handled road 
horses principally, but since automobiles have become so generally used, they 
now handle only draft horses Although they are well known in the eastern 
markets, the Bryants sell principally at home; owing to the superior quality 
of their stock they never fail to bring fancy prices when offered for sale. 
Most of the horses not sold here go to New York, where they are used for 
heavy trucks. They have been in this business for many years and are widely 
known as a result of the same. The Arbuckle coffee people have taken many 
of their horses, as well as other large concerns. 

Both father and son are Republicans, and while they take an abiding in- 
terest in public affairs they have never sought office. Mr. Bryant belongs to 
the Wayne Grange, Patrons of Husbandry. His commodious, imposing and 
modernly appointed home is one of the most attractive in the county, and 
everything alx)ut the Bryant place indicates thrift, prosperity and good man- 
agement. 

Mr. Br^'ant was but a lx)y at the commencement of the great war be- 
tween the states, but in the fall of 1861 he enlisted in Company A, Twentieth 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in which he served very faithfully for a period of 
three years in the Army of the Cumberland and he saw much hard service 
and took part in many hard-fought engagements. His time had expired w^hen 
Sherman made his march to the sea, so he did not accompany his regiment 
on this campaign. He was taken prisoner at Lafayette, Tennessee, but was 
soon afterwards paroled and was sent home. 

Personally, Mr. Bryant and his son are men of integrity, honest, genial 
and obliging, and they have the good will and respect of their many ac- 
quaintances. 



STEPHEN W. SEVITS. 

The backbone of this country is made up of the families which have 
made their homes; w^ho are alive to the best interests of the community in 
which they reside; who^re so honest that it is no trouble for their neighbors 
to know it, and who attend to their own business, being too busy to bother 
themselves about the affairs of others ; who work on steadily from day to day, 
taking the sunshine with the storm and who rear a self-respecting, law-abid- 
ing family to a comfortable home and an honest life. Such people are always 



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628 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

welcome in any country and in any community. They are wealth producers, 
and Knox county, Ohio, has been blessed with many such, among which is 
the Sevits family, of which the subject of this review is a worthy representa- 
tive. 

Stephen \V. Sevits was born on March 7, 1869, in Tiverton township, 
Coshocton county, Ohio, and he is the son of William and Jane (Workman) 
Sevits, and he is a brother of Irven Sevits, whose sketch appears in another 
part of this work. For a full history of this family the reader is referred to 
that sketch. Suffice it to say here that the family of the subject on both sides 
of the house were influential and highly respected in their communities. 

Stephen W. Sevits was reared on a farm where he spent his youth, en- 
gaged, during the crop seasons, at work in the fields and in the winter time 
he attended the public schools of Tiverton township, also the schools of Mt. 
Vernon and the Danville Academy, thus becoming well educated. He was 
married on December 31, 1891, to Matilla Conkle, daughter of William and 
Sarah (Roof) Conkle, a well known family of Union township, and to the 
subject and wife five children were born, namely: William Howard is a 
student in the Danville high school ; Bernard is deceased ; May, Ruth, Orice 
Pearl. 

Following his marriage the subject engaged in farming in Union town- 
ship, this county, for two and one-half years, then engaged in the mercantile 
business at Cavallo, Coshocton county, for two years, after which he went to 
Zuck, Butler township, Knox county, and there continued merchandising for 
two years. In the fall of 1898 he gave up the store business, although he had 
met with a fair measure of success in the same, and turned his attention once 
more to farming and stock raising, also breeding thoroughbred Delaine sheep. 
In March, 1905, he bought his present farm in Union township, three miles 
southeast of Danville, and here he has since resided, making a success of both 
general farming and stock raising, especially with his sheep, which he raises for 
breeding purposes, and his flocks, being the very finest of their kind in the 
country, attract widespread attention and find a very ready market. There 
are no better in the state. Some ewe fleece will weigh twenty-six pounds and 
some ram fleece as high as thirty-four pounds. These thoroughbred animals 
are shipped to all parts of the state and to other states, wherever breeders 
desire high grade stock, Mr. Sevits' reputation being much more than state- 
wide. The greater part of his farm is devoted to grazing and sheep raising; 
blue grass pasture and alfalfa hay are his ideal feed. His place consists of 
one hundred and thirty acres. He has a commodious, modem home in the 
midst of attractive surroundings, and he has numerous convenient outbuild- 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 629 

ings, large bams and stock sheds, for the proper care of his stock during the 
winter season. 

Politically, Mr. Sevits is a Republican, but prior to the year 1903 he 
was a Democrat. He has always been interested and active in public affairs, 
but he has never been an office seeker. He and his family belong to the Dis- 
ciples church and have always been active in church work and in the support 
of the church. 

The death of the subject's wife and mother of his children occurred on 
June 23, 1909, and burial was made in the Workman cemetery at Danville. 

Mr. Sevits is a gentleman whose high sense of honor and genial bearing 
render him popular with his friends and acquaintances. He is public-spirited 
and withholds his support from no movement calculated to be of general good 
to the public. He is especially interested in good schools, and has given his 
children excellent educational advantages, with the result that they are well 
equipped for life's duties. 



LEE DIAL. 



He whose career is now taken under consideration and to whom the 
reader's attention is respectfully directed is numbered among the progressive 
and successful young citizens of the vicinity of Gambier, Knox county, of 
which he has been a resident all his life, while he has gained prosperity 
through his own honest efforts in connection with the development of the 
natural resources and the subsequent prosperity. Because of his industry, his 
honesty and public-spirit and his loyalty to all movements looking to the gen- 
eral good of the locality long honored by the residence of th^ Dial family, he 
has won the esteem of all who know him. 

Lee Dial was born on September 19, 1869, on a farm one mile southeast 
of Gambier, Ohio, and here his home has always been. He is the son of 
James and Catherine (Lauderbaugh) Dial, a prominent old family of Knox 
county, a complete sketch of whom is to be found on another page of this 
work under the caption, James Dial. 

Lee Dial grew to manhood on the home farm and when old enough 
assisted with the general work about the place, receiving his education in the 
public schools of Gambier. When a lad he began learning the milling busi- 
ness in the old Dial mill on the Kokosing river, near the Dial home, of which 



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630 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

his father was part owner at the time. He was under the tutelage of Jacob 
South, who was head miller. This was one of the earliest mills built in this 
locality, and the subject has been connected with the same ever since, through 
its various ownerships and operations. It was formerly equipped with the 
old-fashioned buhr-process and in 1888 the Kenyon Milling Company, com- 
posed of W. S. Wing, H. C. Wing and Jacob Snider, came into possession 
and equipped it with the new roller process and all modern machinery. It 
then became necessary for Mr. Dial to learn the milling business over again, 
which he did under Jacob Snider, who was a practical and expert roller mill 
operator. In 1902 Mr. Dial, with his brother, Richard P. Dial, bought the 
mill property and operated as Dial Brothers until 1910, when Lee Dial be- 
came sole owner, buying his brother's interest and has since operated it with 
much success. This mill is one of the landmarks in this county and is known 
to everyone for miles around, its patrons coming from remote sections of the 
adjacent territory. It was first established in 1824, but it is yet a modem mill 
in every particular, with a capacity of seventy-five barrels of flour per day. 
It is still run by water-power. (Many maintain that flour ground by a water- 
mill is the best made.) It is a great grain trading center for the farmers of 
this part of the county and it is busy every working day in the year. 

In 1909, because of his expert knowledge of streams and construction, 
Mr. Dial was appointed by the commissioners of Knox county inspector of 
bridge construction, some very important and expensive bridge work then 
being done. After serving only a short time he found that his private affairs 
demanded his attention, so he resigned and was succeeded by his brother, 
Richard P. Dial, whose interest in the milling business the subject purchased. 

Politically, Lee Dial is a Republican and has long been active in public 
matters. For a number of years he has served as a member of the Republi- 
can county central committee, also on the township board of elections, and 
he has been a frequent delegate to party conventions. He has been a trustee 
of College township since 1902 and is one of the progressive citizens of the 
county. He is a member of Kokosing Tribe No. 235, Improved Order of Red 
Men. Mr. Dial has never married. He makes his home with his parents, 
who reside near the mill property. He is very fond of outdoor sports and is 
a recognized crack trap shot. He is also much interested in base ball and is a 
popular umpire with the Kenyon College students and students of other col- 
leges. He likes a good story and is a most enjoyable companion, being genial, 
a good mixer and a man of many worthy characteristics, yet plain and un- 
assuming. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 63 1 

WILLIAM ALLEN SILCOTT. 

If there is one thing which distinguishes the American business man over 
those of any other country it is the faculty with which any and all occupations 
are readily taken up by him and made successful. In the older countries it 
was customary for the son to follow the father's pursuit. It is in such coun- 
tries as the United States that full swing can l)e given to the energies of the 
individual. A man may choose any business or profession he desiies, and he 
is limited only by competition. He must meet the skill of others and give as 
good service as they, or he will not secure the positions. Such adaptation to 
any work has been forcibly illustrated in the life of William A. Silcott, whose 
interesting career shows that he has turned his hand to many things. He is 
a well known citizen of Mt. Vernon, where the major part of his life has been 
spent. 

Mr. Silcott was born on Sunday, January 7, 1849, i" ^he northeast cor- 
ner of Ripley township, Holmes county, Ohio, the son of a highly esteemed 
old family there who were engaged in agricultural pursuits. There he grew to 
maturity, assisted in the general work of the farm and attended the common 
schools of Ripley and Monroe townships until the fall of 1864, when he ac- 
companied his parents to Pike township, Knox county, where the family set- 
tled, and there the subject attended two winter terms of school, later attending 
the Mt. Vernon high school for a term in 1866, when Peter Hayes was prin- 
cipal. 

For some time Mr. Silcott drove a horse and wagon over the country 
*^elling tinware from Fredericktown. He then secured employment as printer's 
"devil" and typo and worked in this capacity in various printing offices. In 
the spring of 1870 he obtained a muscle position as janitor with Probate 
Judge Charles E. Critchfield, and later as ''hired hand" or substitute clerk for 
other offices, from time to time until I*'ebruary, 1882, when he became clerk 
of courts, which position he held six years in a manner that reflected much 
credit upon himself and to the eminent satisfacti(Mi of all concerned. Since 
tlieni he has traveled extensively, his territory being confined to Ohio for a 
period of twenty years to this date, aside from collection trips in Wisconsin 
and Nebraska previously, of four and six months each. He made two visits 
to New York city during the Bryan-McKinley campaign of 1896, but on a 
political mission. In 1867 he made a two months' trip to Indiana and Iowa, 
visiting also Chicago and Mississippi river towns, down to St. Louis, thence 
southw-est to Texas county, Missouri, and returned to St. Louis, where he saw 
his first prize fighter, Mike McCool, just after his victory over Aaron Jones 

(Al) 



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632 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

at Cincinnati. He then went to Indiana and later to Dayton, Ohio, where he 
attended the state fair, then to Columbus for the first time, then home from 
a seventy-seven days' trip. In 1877 he went to Chicago, Kansas City and 
Indian Territory, returning home in August during the great railroad strike, 
as a result of which he was compelled to walk a part of the way. 

At present, owing to age of sixty-three, Mr. Silcott is more or less on the 
retired list, though in good health. He devotes his time to abstracting land 
titles and making collections. He reads considerable of history, politics and 
current events. Of the former he has written much about Ohio, having 
visited every county of the state from two to a dozen or more times. H_as 
some historical and statistical typewritten manuscript for posterity to peruse 
in the future. Mr. Silcott has been married and has but one child, a single 
daughter, and but few relatives. He has been an attendant at Sunday schools 
and churches from boyhood and yet for want of the moving spirit, is not a 
member. He has been a member of but one lodge, in early days, the duties 
and exercises of which are not to his nature and liking. In politics he has 
always been a Democrat, though not lioop tight. 



DAVID W. STRUBLE. 

One of the most noteworthy facts connected with country life in the 
United States is the easy manner in which a vocation may be varied or wholly 
changed. General Grant, in his memoirs, expressed his surprise and gratifi- 
cation at the easy manner in which his soldiers could carry on all phases of 
the art of war from their own knowledge of the various trades. They could 
print a newspaper, build a bridge, cook a meal of victuals to perfection, con- 
duct a flouring mill or saw mill, and in fact could do anything he wanted 
done. It is the custom in the armies of Europe to take with them on their 
war campaigns special artificers to do the specific duty or service likely to be 
required. The truth is that the average soldier of the army of the United 
States is higher up in the scale of intelligence and improvement than his 
European brother. He knows more and hence can accomplish more. This 
fact has been well exemplified in the career of David W. Struble, of Fred- 
ericktown, Knox county, both in his army life and his private affairs, for he 
has ever seemed capable of doing whatever was required of him. Skill like 
his and that of his honored father before him, while often met with, is not 
altogether common. 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 633 

Mr. Struble was born on April 10, 1841, in Fredericktown, Ohio, and 
he is the son of John D. and Mary (Headley) Struble, who grew up in New 
Jersey and were married there in 1822, from which state they emigrated in 
covered wagons of the pioneer type to Fredericktown, this county, in 1832, 
being among the early settlers, their trip over the woody mountains being 
tedious and somewhat dangerous. The father was a blacksmith in New 
Jersey, and after he came to Ohio he followed blacksmithing, milling, farm- 
ing and merchandising, being always a very busy man of affairs, and he met 
with reasonable success in whatever line he turned his attention to and was 
influential in the community in the early days. Politically, he was a Demo- 
crat, but he was not an aspirant for office or leadership. He and his wife 
were members of the Baptist church. His death occurred on May 21, 1875, 
at the age of eighty-two years, his widow surviving until April 4, 1889, 
reaching the age of eighty-six years. Both are buried in Fredericktown 
cemetery. 

The son, David W., has spent all his life in Fredericktown with the ex- 
ception of the years he was in the army during the Civil war. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools here and when a boy assisted his father with the 
work on the farm. He enlisted in defense of the Union on August 5, 1861, 
in Company A, Second New York Volunteer Cavalry, having gone to New 
Jersey on a visit and enlisted from there. He served very faithfully, accord- 
ing to his comrades, in the Army of Virginia, seeing considerable hard ser- 
vice, participating in many important engagements, but he was never wounded 
or taken prisoner. For meritorious conduct he was commissioned a corporal. 
He was discharged on September 14, 1864, having served a little more than 
three years. After his discharge he returned to Fredericktown and resumed 
farming. He also engaged in the mercantile business and the livery business 
with his brother Daniel for about two years. Following this he engaged in 
the drug business alone, which he conducted for several years. For a number 
of years he was in the produce business, also handled general merchandise, 
and finally dealt in. boots and shoes exclusively. His business life has been 
marked with uniform success. 

Politically, Mr. Struble is a Democrat, and during President Cleveland's 
second administration he was postmaster at Fredericktown, serving four 
years. He has also acted as census enumerator. Since leaving the postoffice 
he has been living a retired life, giving some attention to chicken raising by 
modern methods. 

Mr. Struble was married on May 10, 1866, to Anna E. Cummings, 
daughter of James and Christena (McMillen) Cummings, a well known 



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634 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

family of Fredericktown. They have one daughter, Christena, who is living 
at home. 

The subject is a member of the Masons at Fredericktown, also the 
chapter at Mt. Vernon; he belongs to the local post of the Grand Army of 
the Republic. In his father's family there were nine children, only three of 
whom are living, Daniel, a prominent banker and real estate owner at Fred- 
ericktown; William, at Cincinnati, and David W. of this review. The 
Struble family has been prominent in the development of this community 
for the past eighty years, as intimated at the beginning of this sketch, and 
they yet control large interests and are active in the business and civic affairs 
of the county, — in fact, few names are more prominently associated with the 
financial interests and material progress of .this locality. They have ever 
sought to do their full duty in all the relations of life and have tried to keep 
the honor of the familv name untarnished. 



HARRY S. BUNN. 



Conspicuous among tlie representative business men and public-spirited 
citizens of Mt. Vernon. Knox county, is Harry S. Bunn. who has spent most 
of his life in his home community, where he has made his influence felt for 
good, as has his father l>efore him, the history of the Bunn family being 
closely interwoven with that of the county for many decades, whose efforts 
have always been for the advancement of the same as well as for the social 
and moral uplift. He has led a well regulated life, thereby gaining the respect 
and admiration of all his fellow citizens, and he is therefore eminently eligi- 
ble for representation in a biographical work of a scope intended in the 
present volume. 

Mr. Runn was born in the city of Mt. Vernon on August 4, 1870. He 
is the son of Ogden S. and Ella (Crandall) Bunn, the father a native of Mt. 
Vernon also. The Bunn family is of English origin, and they came to Knox 
county from Xew Jersey in the pioneer days. The Crandalls were also an 
early pioneer family and I)oth prominent in the early development of the 
same, living to see its wonderful growth from the primeval womis to one of" 
the foremost sections of the Buckeye state. 

Ogden S. Bunn was a well known painter and decorator contractor, as 
was also his father, the paternal grandfather of the subject, in fact, the Bunns 
have long been known as a family of skilled painters and decorators. The 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 635 

father was a soldier in the Civil war and he had an enviable record as a de- 
fender of the national union. His death occurred in 1875, his widow sur- 
viving until 1890. The father was a Republican in politics and an intelligent 
and highly respected citizen. 

Harry S. Bunn, of this review, spent his childhood and early youth in 
Mt. Vernon and here he attended the public school, receiving a fairly good 
education, which has later ixi life been supplemented with a wide range of 
miscellaneous reading. In the year 1880 he and his mother moved to Em- 
poria, Kansas, where they made their home for a period of three years, when 
they moved to Kansas City. His mother died in Kansas City in 1890. He 
there began the trade of painter and decorator, following thus in the foot- 
steps of his father and grandfather before him. In 1893 he moved to 
Chicago and there remained during the Columbian Exposition, probably the 
greatest world's fair ever held. He returned to Mt. Vernon in 1894. Here 
the subject worked at his trade with his uncle, G. W. Bunn, and the latter s 
son until they went out of business in 1907, in which year the subject em- 
barked in business for himself and he has since continued alone. Having 
won a wide reputaion as a skilled painter and decorator, his services have 
been in great demand and he is kept constantly busy. He does general con- 
tracting in this line and frequently handles some big jobs, his work always 
being not only adroitly but conscientiously done, so that he has the confi- 
dence and good will of all, his work taking him to many surrounding towns 
as well as Mt. Vernon. 

Mr. Bunn was married on June 25, 1897, to Flora Lease, daughter of 
William and Mary (Allen) Lease, a highly respected Mt. Vernon family, 
which originally came from Newcastle, Coshocton county, Ohio. This union 
has resulted in the birth of one son, George. 

Politically, Mr. Bunn is a Republican and, while he takes a good citi- 
zen's interest in public affairs, he has never been an office seeker. 



FRANK L. BENNETT. 

In placing Frank L. Bennett, well known hardware dealer of Mt. Ver- 
non, in the front rank of Knox county business men, simple justice is done 
lo a biographical fact, recognized throughout this locality by those at all 
familiar with his history. A man of rare judgment, sound discretion, keen 
discernment and business ability of a high order, he has managed with tact- 



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636 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

» 

ful success imix)rtant enterprises and so impressed his individuality upon 
the community as to gain recognition among its leading citizens and repre- 
sentative men of affairs. 

Mr. Bennett was born April 17, 1864, in Groveport, Franklin county. 
Ohio, and he is the son of Thomas B. and Anna J. (Patterson) Bennett, both 
natives of Ohio, the father devoting his life to farming in Franklin county, 
never becoming a resident of Knox county ; they cire both now deceased. 

Frank L. Bennett lived on the home farm until he was fourteen years 
of age, and there attended the district schools, then went to Springfield, Ohio, 
entering the shops of William H. Whiteley, remaining there six years; he 
then went to Columbus, Ohio, and for four years was in the employ of the 
Columbus Buggy Company, then after having become very proficient as a 
mechanic, he went to Galloway, Franklin county, and took charge of the 
carriage shop of Edward Courtright, and remained there five years, giving 
his usual high-grade service. He came to Mt. Vernon in 1896 and engaged 
in the hardware business with A. B. Henderson, under the firm name of 
Henderson & Bennett. In December, 1901, he sold his interest and in 
February, 1902, engaged in business for himself at No. 314 South Main 
street, where he built up a very satisfactory trade and remained until March. 
191 1, when he moved to more commodious quarters at No. 307 South Main 
street. He has a neat and attractive store, in which is tastily arranged a 
large, choice and carefully selected stock of all kinds of hardware, farm im- 
plements, tools, plumbers' supplies and builders' supplies, except lumber. He 
carries on a very extensive and lucrative trade, which is constantly growing, 
his customers coming from all over the county, for they here find goods of 
excellent quality, reasonable prices and honest and courteous treatment. 

Mr. Bennett is a stockholder in the Mt. Vernon Ice Company, and as a 
business man he has been very successful. Politically, he is a Republican 
and is always active for reforms and improved conditions whenever possible. 
He has never sought office, but has taken an interest in public matters, regard- 
ing it as every man\s duty to vote and uphold what he believes to be right. 
Fraternally, he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the encampment and the Knights of Pythias, being treasurer of the encamp- 
ment and the Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Bennett was united in marriage on March 22, 1890. to Anna D. 
Martin, daughter of Dariah and Margaret (Webb) Martin, of Troy, Miami 
county. Ohio. Both parents are deceased. The modern, pleasant and neatly 
kept home of Mr. and Mrs. Bennett, on East Hamtramck street, hns been 
blessed by the birth of one child, an interesting daughter, bearing the name 
Bernice, who is still a member of the familv circle. 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 637 

Mrs. Bennett belongs to the Baptist church, while Mr. Bennett affiliates 
with the same, being a liberal supporter and a regular attendant, but not a 
member. Since coming to Knox county he has won a vast circle of friends 
among whom he intends spending the balance of his days. 



LESTER L. WILLIAMS, M. D. 

The county of Khox numbers among its citizens many skillful physi- 
cians, lawyers of state repute, well known manufacturers and business men 
of much more than local reputation, and she is not lacking in men who have 
achieved distinction in almost all callings requiring intellectual abilities of a 
high order, and she is proud of them, as she should be. Among the first class 
mentioned Dr. Lester L. Williams, of Mt. Vernon, occupies a conspicuous 
place. 

Doctor Williams was born on January 15, 1858, near Croton, Licking 
county, Ohio, on a farm, and he is the son of John W. and Sarah (Scott) 
Williams, both parents being of Scotch descent, the father having been born 
in Ohio and the mother in Pennsylvania. About 1869 the family moved to 
Mil ford township, Knox county, where the father engaged in farming and 
also followed threshing grain for many years; he became well established 
there and was a man whom everybody respected: his death occurred in 1882, 
after which the widow and family moved to Mt. Vernon, where the widow 
and mother passed to her rest in 1905. 

Doctor Williams spent his youth on the home farm, where he assisted 
with the general work when not attending the district schools. After coming 
to Mt. Vernon he attended the city schools and the high school for a time, 
but did not graduate. Having long cherished a strong desire to study medi- 
cine, he entered the office of Doctor Robinson, a prominent physician of Mt. 
Vernon. In 1879 he took the course at the Jefferson Medical College at 
Philadelphia, where he made a splendid record and from which he was 
graduated in 1882. Soon afterwards he located at Reedtown, a village in 
Seneca county, Ohio, for the practice of his profession, and he remained 
about eight years, building up a very satisfactory and lucrative practice, 
when, seeking a broader field for the exercise of his talents and desiring to 
return home, he came back to Mt. Vernon upon the death of his old preceptor. 
Doctor Robinson, and here established himself in the practice with his resi- 
dence and office at the corner of Gav and Gambler streets, at which location 



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638 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. ' 

he has remained to the present time, having built up a very large general 
practice and few men in the profession in this section of Ohio stand higher 
than he, in the estimation and confidence of the people. He keeps well ad- 
vised on the newest discoveries in the medical world and he is frequently 
called in consultation with other physicians on important cases throughout 
this locality. 

Politically, the Doctor is a Republican, but, while active and interested 
in public matters, he has never been an office seeker, preferring to devote 
his undivided attention to his profession. Being deeply interested in educa- 
tional matters, he served nine years as a member of the board of education 
at Mt. Vernon. He is a member of the Masonic order and active in lodge 
work, being a member of the Knights Templar and the Ancient Arabic Order 
of N'obles of the Mvstic Shrine. 



WILLIAM MILD. 



Prominent in the business life of Knox county and as a citizen whose 
influence extends throughout the locality, the name of William Mild, of Mt. 
Vernon, stands out conspicuously. Characterized by breadth of wisdom and 
strong individuality, and in all his enterprises and undertakings actuated by 
noble motives ami high resolves, his success and achievement but represent 
the result of fit utilization of innate talent in directing eflFort along those lines 
wliere mature judgment and rare discrimination lead the way. 

Mr. Mild was born June 11, 1850. in Cincinnati, Ohio, and he is the son 
of Christian and Fredrica (Rettig) Mild, both natives of Germany, from 
which country they emigrated to America as young people, first settling in 
St. Louis, Missouri, where they were married. The father proved his loyalty 
to his adopted country by serving through both the Mexican and Civil wars, 
serving in a very faithful manner in the latter for three and a half years in 
the Twenty-eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was a baker by trade and 
followed that line of endeavor for many years in the city of Cincinnati, later 
moving to Hamilton, Ohio, and there he and his wife both died and are buried 
there. 

William Mild was educated in the public schools of Cincinnati and at 
College Hill. When a young man he learned steam engineering and was a 
stationary engineer for ten years in Cincinnati. He then moved to Hamilton. 
Ohio, where he was, for three years, engaged in the galvanized iron business. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 639 

which he sold out and became an employe of the Niles Tool Works in that 
city. He traveled for them through the South and East, establishing ma- 
chinery, remaining with that firm five or six years, then went with the H. C. 
Frick Company of Pittsburg, selling ice plant machinery and remained with 
them eight years, traveling through the Southern and Eastern states. Upon 
leaving this concern he engaged with the Piatt Iron Works of Dayton, Ohio, 
manufacturers of ice plant machinery, as supplemental of the ice machinery 
department of their works and he remained with them until 1900, when, 
owing to ill health, he returned to Hamilton and was retired from business 
two years. He had given the above named firms, all well known throughout 
the United States, eminent satisfaction in every respect and he stood high 
with the officials of the same. In 1902 he came to Mt. Vernon and bought the 
Quail flour mill, known as the Mt. Vernon Milling Company, which he oper- 
ated for one year, then sold out and built the Mt. Vernon Ice and Cold Stor- 
age Company's plant, of which he was a large stockholder and manager, and 
he has continued to the present time. Under his able and judicious manage- 
ment the plant has been very successful and has grown rapidly and a large 
and ever increasing business is carried on. The plant has a capacity of twenty 
tons per day and has been operated to its full capacity from the first. The 
plant is modern in every detail and substantial, equipped with the best and 
latest designed machinery. Mr. Mild gives his undivided attention to the 
business, and he has the good will and confidence of the business men 
throughout the locality owing to his courtesy and his honorable methods in 
all relations of life. 

Politically, Mr. Mild is a Republican and, while he is not an office seeker, 
he keeps well informed on public matters and is interested in his party's wel- 
fare. He is a member of Mt. Vernon Lodge No. 140, Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. 

Mr. Mild and his associates, in connection with their ice plant, conduct 
an extensive coal business, handling all kinds of domestic and steam coals 
and they have a very large trade in the same. They ship large quantities of 
their ice to other places, their output being l^eyond the consumption of Mt. 
\^ernon. 

The domestic life of Mr. Mild began on January 16, 1872, when he was 
united in marriage with Louisa Klinkle, a lady of culture and education, the 
daughter of George and Elizabeth (Imhoof) Klinkle, a prominent family of 
Hamilton, Ohio. They are the parents of eight children, five sons and three 
daughters, namely: Charles L., of Mt. Vernon; William E., of Dayton: 
Edwin G., of Mt. Vernon; Alvin and Irvin, also of Mt. Vernon: the daugh- 



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640 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

ters are Lena, who is at home; Emma married Timothy Osborn, and they 
live at Mt. Vernon; Clara is a member of the family circle. The pleasant 
and attractive home of the MiUis is at No. 1 10 East Chestnut street, in one of 
the best residence districts in the city. 

Mr. Mild is an energetic business man of wide experience and of great 
capacity, which enable him to quickly grasp a situation and make the most 
of an opportunity. He is a pleasant, kind and obliging gentleman who makes 
friends readily. 



WILLIAM McGEE. 



The record of William McGree, of Mt. Vernon, Knox county, is that of a 
man who has worked his way from a modest beginning up to a position of 
considerable prominence by his efforts, which have been practically unaided, 
which fact renders him the more worthy of the praise that is freely accorded 
him by his fellow men. His life has been one of unceasing industry and per- 
severance, and the notably systematic and honorable methods he has followed 
have won him the unbounded confidence and esteem of all who have formed 
his acquaintance, and in looking over the list of Knox county's business men 
who have succeeded in their life work, especially those whose place of resi- 
dence is in the picturesque city of Mt. Vernon, the biographer deems none 
more worthy of representation in a work of this nature than that ef the gen- 
tleman whose name appears above. 

Mr. McGee was born on January 20, 1847, ^" ^^e province of New 
Brunswick, Canada. He is the son of John and Catherine (McCutchin) 
McGee. who came from Edinburgh, Scotland, to Nova Scotia, after a tedious 
voyage in an old-time sailing vessel, landing on the shores of the western 
liemisphere on June 29, 1845. The father was a linen weaver by trade in the 
old country, but after coming to Canada he engaged in farming. His death 
occurred on July i, 1880, his widow surviving until in August, 1892. They 
never came down to the States. 

William McGee, of this sketch, was reared on his father's farm and 
there he assisted with the general work. He had little opportunity to obtain 
an education, but, a student by nature, he became self-educated, his parents, 
who were fairly well educated, assisting him. When he grew to young man- 
hood he was employed in the lumber camps and quarries of Canada. In 
1875 he came to the United States, first settling at Manchester, New Hamp- 
shire, and worked in the lumber camps during the winter months. In the 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 64I 

spring of 1876 he went to Barre, the great granite country of Vermont. The 
granite industry was then in its infancy and Mr. McGee became one of the 
pioneer developers of that great business, which grew to such magnitude as 
to overshadow alLother industries of the commonwealth, giving it the sobri-. 
quet of the ''Granite state.'* He went into the quarries with a determination 
to learn all there was to l)e known alx)ut granite formations and its suscepti- 
bility of being worked, remaining there for some time. He then went into 
the manufacturing department and learned the cutting and designing end of 
the business, becoming very proficient in this line. He engaged in business 
for himself with both a quarry and a factory and became thoroughly identified 
with the industry'. In 1904, on account of climatic conditions, he sold his 
interests in Vermont and came west, locating in the month of April, 1905, at 
Mt. Vernon, Ohio, and opened a factory on South Main street. On Novem- 
l)er 6th of that year he lost his plant by fire, every dollar's worth of property 
he had in the world going up in flames. But, nothing daunted, the sterling 
mettle of His Scotch ancestry (he having inherited many of their sterling at- 
tributes) asserted itself: he was not to be thwarted by a seemingly untoward 
circumstance, although his stock of granite, machinery, horse, wagons — 
everything — was gone, so he forged ahead, and, having in the few months of 
his residence here won the good will and confidence of the people, he was 
encouraged to go to work with a will to win, and they made it possible for 
him to re-establish himself in business. He accordingly opened a new shop 
and factory on North Main street, near Mound View cemetery, and his 
business grew rapidly from the first, and he prospered to such an extent that 
after eighteen months he found it necessary to find a new location, one con- 
venient to the railroad for better shipping facilities and he accordingly 
moved to West Gambier street on the Baltimore & Ohio and the Cleveland. 
Akron & Columbus railroads. There is no better equipped granite monument 
plant in the state, and it is the present intention of the subject to make it one 
of the best in the United States. He has installed all modern machinery and 
devices for rapid and skilled work. He has everything under a superb sys- 
tem and understands the business from the (juarries to the designing, manu- 
facturing and selling. Many of his up-to-date granite-working machines ar^ 
of his own designing. His firm is known as the McGee-Starr Granite Com- 
pany, of which William McGee is president; Charles Colville, vice-president: 
Walter Starr, secretary and treasurer: William H. Robinson, manager. The 
following are also members of the company : Dr. Rol^ert Colville, Cliarles 
Colville, John Colville, of Pittsburg; and A. D. Stokes. This is a strong 
company of representative men. 



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642 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Only the most proficient artisans and most adroit granite workers are 
employed by the firm, hence the superior grade of the work turned out by this 
company. The granite is obtained in the rough from the quarries, the origi- 
nal designs being closely followed and the cutting, polishing and lettering is 
all done in the home shop The business of the company covers a wide area, 
the well known high-grade quality of the work done here bringing the com- 
pany orders from all over Ohio, and from New York, Pennsylvania, Indiana 
and as far west as Nebraska. 

William McGee was married on October 12, 1892, to Elizabeth Patter- 
son, a member of an English family of the province of Quebec, Canada. This 
family later moved to Barre, Vermont. To Mr. and Mrs. McGee four chil- 
dren have been born, two sons and two daughters, namely: Naomi, Ruth, 
William and Herold, all living at home. 

Fraternally, Mr. McGee is a member of the Masonic order and the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, and while living in Canada he belonged to 
the Orangemen. Politically, he is a Republican and a loyal supporter of our 
government and institutions. Religiously, he and his family belong to the 
Presbyterian church and they are active in the work of the same. The family 
home is at No. 716 North Main street. 

Mr. McGee is a man of fine characteristics. Born and reared in an 
humble but honorable and industrious family, he is a man of fortitude, cour- 
age and self-reliance, an obliging, friendly gentleman whom it is a pleasure 
to meet. 



EDWARD C BEGGS. D. D. S. 

Among the earnest men whose professional skill, enterprise and depth 
of character have gained a prominent place in the community and the respect 
and confidence of his fellow citizens is Dr. Edward C. Beggs, a man of de- 
cided views and laudable ambition, his influence having ever made for the 
advancement of society and the general public and in the vocation to which 
his energies are devoted, he ranks among the leading dentists of Knox county 
and this section of the Buckeye state. 

Doctor Beggs, who for a number of years has successfully practiced his 
profession at Mt. Vernon, is a native of Vinton, Gallia county, Ohio, and he is 
the son of George W. and Taphena (McMillin) Beggs, both natives of Ohio, 
and both of Scotch and English descent, their progenitors having come to 
America in the sixteenth century. The father was a newspaper man and he 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 643 

edited and published a newspaper in Gallipolis and Vinton, Ohio, and Charles- 
ton, West Virginia, and became well known to the newspaper fraternity. He 
served in the Civil war, in Company B, Thirty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 
having enlisted in 1861 and he served as a private until the close of the war. 
He was wounded during a skirmish while on picket duty on Gauly mountain. 
West Virginia. He saw much hard service, participating in forty-eight bat- 
ties and skirmishes, some ranking as the greatest of the war, and he was a 
very faithful soldier through it all. Returning from the army, he resumed 
newspaper w^ork. His death occurred in April, 1877, his wife having pre- 
ceded him to the grave in May. 1875; they are buried in the cemetery at 
Vinton, Gallia county. 

Dr. Edward C. Beggs, of this review, grew up in a newspaper environ- 
ment and he was educated in the public schools of Gallia county. Ohio, also 
attended Ewington Academy there, later attending the I^banon Normal Col- 
lege at Lebanon, this state, from which he was graduated in 1888. Then he 
began life for himself by clerking in a hardware store in Jackson, Ohio, 
where he remained three years. He then l)egan the study of dentistry with 
Dr. T. W. Jackson, of Jackson, Ohio, then entered the Ohio College of 
Dental Surgery at Cincinnati, from which he was graduated in 1892 with 
an excellent record. Soon afterwards he located in the city of Columbus and 
worked at the dental office of Houghton & Price for three years. In Novem- 
ber, 1894, he came to Mr. Vernon and opened an oflfice and has been success- 
fully engaged in the practice here ever since, maintaining a well equipped 
and neatly arranged office in the Columbia building for the past fourteen 
years. Everything in his office is thoroughly up-to-date, for he has been a 
close student and has kept abreast of the times in everything pertaining to 
his profession, and he has I)een very successful, his patients coming from all 
parts of the country and numbering many hundreds. 

Doctor Beggs was married on March 6, 1895, to Martha Newvahner, 
(laughter of Henry and Mary (Pryor) Newvahner, of Jackson, Ohio. Her 
parents came from Germany and they are both deceased. To the Doctor 
and wife four children have been lx)rn, namely: Mary T., John E. and 
Martha Jane, all living at home: Ida May, the second child, is deceased. 

Politically, Doctor Beggs is a Republican and lie has been active in 
public matters for some time. He has served in the city council and as a 
member of the Republican county committee and has been a frecjuent delegate 
to district, county and state conventions, where he never failed to make his in- 
fluence felt for the good of the party. Fraternally, he belongs to the Masons, 
the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He 



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644 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

has filled the chairs in the local Masonic order and he was a lieutenant in the 
Uniform Rank of the Kjnights of Pythias. 

The family home is in South Vernon, just outside of the corporation; 
they have a beautiful and pleasant dwelling in the midst of a splendid grove 
and own six acres of valuable ground there. The trees are of natural growth 
and the lawns are well kept. This was the home of General Coxey while he 
resided in Mt. Vernon, and it is a fine old place, one of the most desirable, 
in fact, in the county. 

Doctor Beggs is a member of the Christian church and his wnfe belongs 
to the Presbyterian church, and they havx long been active in church and 
Sunday school work. Mrs. Beggs is a musician of ability, talented both as a 
vocalist and pianist, and she is a member of the local musical club and is 
popular with the best society of the city, as it also the Doctor. The daughter 
Mar>' is also popular in musical circles ; as are also all the children. 

Doctor Beggs is a member of the Ohio State, also the Knox County 
Dental Societies, being secretary and treasurer of the latter. 



ALMANZA R. SIPE. 

This utilitarian age has been especially prolific in men of action, clear- 
brained men of high resolves and noble purposes, who give character and 
stability to the communities honored by their citizenship, and whose influence 
and leadership are easily discernible in the various enterprises that have added 
so greatly to the high reputation which Knox county enjoys among her sister 
counties of the great Buckeye commonwealth. Conspicuous among this class 
of men whose place of residence is in Mt. Vernon is Almanza R. Sipe, the well 
known and progressive merchant to a brief outline of whose long, industrious 
and interesting career the biographer is pleased to address himself. 

Mr. Sipe was born on December 6, 1846, at Shelby, Richland county, 
Ohio, the son of Daniel and Florilla (Rogers) Sii>e, both natives of Pennsyl- 
vania, the father bom in Adams county and the mother in Luzerne. They 
spent their childhood in the Keystone state, but left there when young and 
were married in Ohio. The father was a merchant tailor in Shelby, Ohio, 
where he spent his life after coming to this state, he and his w^ife both being 
deceased at this writing. 

The son, Almanza R., spent his youth in his native town and was edu- 
cated in the Shelby public schools. Upon leaving high school he entered the 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 645 

tailoring establishment of his father and learned the trade, and remained in 
business with his father until in September, 1878, when he came to Mt. 
Vernon and was here employed by James Rogers in the tailoring business 
for alx)ut four years. In 1882 he formed the fimi of A. R. Sipe & Company, 
his partner being John M. Ewalt. They continued successfully until 1887, 
when Mr. Sipe bought Mr. Ewalt's interest and continued in business as A. R. 
Sipe until 1903, when he took William H. White as partner, the firm becom- 
ing Sipe & White and so continues to the present time. In 1887, when Mr. 
Sipe began managing his business alone, he added men's furnishings to his line 
and in 1903 a stock of hats and caps were added. Mr. Sipe has been longer 
in the merchant tailoring business than any man in Mt. Vernon and he has 
been very successful, having enjoyed a liberal patronage all the while, and 
being highly skilled in the work and honest in all his dealings with his fellow 
men he has had no trouble in retaining his customers and in winning their 
good will and friendship. His place of business is at No. 135 South Main 
street, where he has been since 1904, a modem store in every respect, neatly 
kept, well arranged, equipped with every modern convenience and always fully 
stocked with goods which have been most carefully selected, and he com- 
mands the best trade of the community. In addition to his tailoring business 
and men's furnishings, Mr. Sipe has been connected with other lines of busi- 
ness. He is a stockholder and director of the Reeves Engineering Company, 
manufacturers of gas engines, which is doing an extensive and rapidly grow- 
ing business. He is also a director in the Home Building and Loan Company 
and has always been interested and active in all movements that have for 
their object the advancement of Mt. Vernon, with which city he became very 
much enamored the first day of his arrival and his faith in the place has con- 
tinued to grow, for he believes in the city and her people and has done his 
full share in supporting her interests whenever occasion presented itself. 

Mr. Sipe was married on May 25, 1869, to Helen Virginia Stimmell, 
daughter of Henry and Margaret (Snyder) Stimmell, a highly respected 
family of Shelby. Ohio. Mrs. Sipe was called to her rest on November 26, 
1900. This union was without issue. In September, 1902, Mr. Sipe was 
married to Carrie McMillin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John F. McMillin, 
well known family of Martinsburg, in an early day. The father was a sol- 
dier in the Union army during the Civil war, was taken prisoner and- died in 
Libby prison a few months before the birth of his daughter, Carrie. 

Politically, Mr. Sipe is a Republican, and while he is always interested 
and well informed on public matters he has never been an office seeker, but 
he has ever done his full share in promoting public interests, being active and 



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646 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

liberal in his supix)rt of all enterprises for the public good in the vicinity 
where he has lived so long and the interests of which he has had at heart. 

Mr. Sipe became a member of the Masonic order in 1868 at Shelby, 
Ohio, and still retains his membership. He and his wife belong to the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which he has been a member of the board of 
stewards for a number of years, and- he has long been an active Sunday school 
worker, having been superintendent and he has been a teacher in the school 
for a number of years. The pleasant and substantial family home is at No. 
306 North Main street. 



THURMAN L. ELEY, M. D. 

It is with a great degree of satisfaction that reference is made to the life 
of one whose career has been characterized by untiring perseverance, who 
has attained success in any vocation requiring definiteness of purpose and 
detennined action. Such a life, whether it be one of calm, consecutive en- 
deavor, or of sudden meteoric accomplishments, must abound in both lesson 
and incentive and prove a guide to the young men whose fortunes are still 
matters for the future to determine. For a number of years Doctor Eley 
has directed his efforts toward the goal of success in Knox county and his 
patient continuance has been very adequately rewarded. 

Dr. Thurman L. Eley, of Mt. Vernon, was born August 30, 1869, in 
Harrison township, Knox county, Ohio, and he has spent his life in his native 
community, his boyhood home standing two miles east of Gambier. He is 
the son of Peter W. and Martha J. (Barcus) Eley, l)oth of whom were born 
and reared in Knox county, where they still reside, being now advanced in 
years, having devoted their lives to farming on the old homestead east of 
Gambier. They have Ix^en prominent in Harrison township for a half cen- 
tury and have a host of friends there. 

The son. Thurman L., grew up on tlic home farm, which he worked 
when a boy and in the winter attended the country district schools, later at- 
tending the high school at Gambier and also at Martinsburg. He then began 
teaching in the district schools of Harrison township and continued success- 
fully foK three years. In 1890 he and his older brother, Carey B. Eley, went 
to Kiansas City, Kansas, and there they were in the employ of the Union 
Pacific Railroad Company and there Carey B. succumbed to an attack of 
typhoid fever. Thurman L. returned to Ohio with the body and here he 
remained and took up the study of medicine under Dr. J. F. Shrantz. of 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 647 

Martinsburg, Knox county, in whose office he remained one year, then en- 
tered the Indiana Medical College, at Indianapolis, where he took a three 
years' course, making an excellent record and graduating in March, 1894. 
He soon afterwards located in Martinsburg, where he remained a year, and 
in 1896 he came to Mt. Vernon, where he has since remained. He was suc- 
cessful from the first and has enjoyed a very lucrative patronage with the city 
and county, having been very successful as a general practitioner and keeping 
fully abreast of the times in everything pertaining to his profession. He is 
an eclectic in the practice and the only one in Mt. Vernon. 

Doctor Eley was married on September 19, 1894, to Lura E. Smith, 
daughter of William J. and Susanna (Baker) Smith, of Pleasant township, 
this county, she having been reared and educated near Gambier, where her 
family have long been well known and highly respected. Mr. Smith was a 
native of New Jersey, where he spent his early life, coming to Knox county, 
Ohio, in an early day and engaged in farming here, where his death occurred 
in 1904; his widow survives. One son, Forest W., has been bom to Mr. and 
Mrs. Eley. 

Politically, the Doctor is a Democrat and, while he is always interested 
in the success of his party, he is not active. He has served as a member of 
the city board of health, resigning after several years of faithful service. He 
is a member of the Knox County Medical Society and of the Ohio and Na- 
tional Medical Associations. He and his family are members of the Gay 
Street Methodist Episcopal church, the Doctor being a member of the official 
board and active in church and Sunday school work. The Doctor's home and 
office is at No. 202 East Front street, Mt. Vernon. He has an excellently 
equipped office, everything up-to-date and, being a man of fine attainments 
and pleasing address, he is always kept busy, having the confidence and good 
will of all classes. 



JUDSON VINCENT. 



The biographies of the representative men of a county bring to light 
many hidden treasures of mind, character and courage, well calculated to 
arouse the pride of their family and of the community and it is a source of 
regret that the people are not more familiar with the personal history of such 
men, in the ranks of whom may be found tillers of the soil, mechanics, 
teachers, as well as lawyers, physicians, bankers and members of other voca- 
tions and professions. Judson Vincent, of Mt. Vernon, is distinctively one 
(42) 



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648 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

of the representative citizens of Knox county, and as such has made his in- 
fluence felt among his fellow men and earned a name for enterprise, integrity 
and honor that entitles him to worthy notice in a work of the province of 
the one at hand. 

Mr. Vincent was born May 23, 1859, in Howard township, Knox county, 
Ohio, and he is the son of Alexander N. and Mary J. (Buchanan) Vincent, 
both natives of Washington county, Pennsylvania, but who early in life 
moved to Knox county, Ohio. Grandfather Alexander Vincent came to 
Knox county with his family in 1837 and settled in Howard township, where 
he engaged in farming and was influential among the pioneers there. Alex- 
ander N. Vincent, his son and the father of the subject, was also a farmer, 
and in 1868 he moved to Brown township, Knox county, where he purchased 
a farm on which he prospered through general farming and extensive dealing 
in live stock. He became well known throughout the county and, like his 
father, he was a man whose character w^as above reproach. He was a Re- 
publican, but not active in party affairs. His death occurred in March, 1904, 
having been preceded to the grave by his wife in October, 1896, and they 
are both buried in Jelloway cemetery, Howard township. 

Judson Vincent grew to maturity on the home farm, where he worked 
diligently during his boyhood, attending the common schools during the 
winter months. Applying himself closely to his text-books, he was enabled 
to begin teaching in the district schools when nineteen years old. During 
vacations he attended a si)ecial school in Danville, Knox county, and he after- 
wards taught in the graded schools of the county, giving eminent satisfaction 
as an instructor and his services were in great demand. 

Mr. Vincent has always been interested in politics and public affairs, and 
he is a Republican of the old school. In 1892 he was appointed deputy 
county treasurer under S. G. Dowds, serving four years, and at the expira- 
tion of Mr. Dowds' term of office, Mr. Vincent was elected county treasurer 
at a time when the county was Democratic, and he served four years. After 
his term of office had expired he engaged in the mercantile business in Mt. 
Vernon, purchasing the interest of John M. Myers in the firm of Myers & 
Laudenbaugh, and six months later also purchased the interest of Mr. Hugh 
Laudenbaugh. He was so engaged for four years, or until 1905, during 
which time he was elected to the city council, and under the new municipal 
code, in 1902, he was elected a member of the lx)ard of public service, serving 
two terms and an extended term, in all about five years. In June, 1904, he 
was appointed a member of the board of managers of the Ohio State Re- 
formator\' at Mansfield, by Governor Herrick, and he performed his duties 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 649 

SO faithfully and acceptably, as he had done in all his positions of public 
trust, that he was re-appointed to this position in 1908 by Governor Harris 
for a full term of six years and served until August 20, 191 1, at which time 
the Ohio state board of administration took over all the institutions of the 
state. He has served as a member and as chairman of the Knox county 
Republican committee and has frequently been a delegate to county, district 
and state conventions, where he made his influence felt for the good of his 
party in whose councils he has always been prominent. During the years he 
has been connected with the development of the gas and oil interests of Knox 
county. He is also a stockholder and director in the Knox Lumber & Coal 
Company, and has always been active in promoting the general interests of 
Mt. Vernon and community. 

Fraternally, Mr. Vincent is a member of Mt. Zion Lodge No. 9, Free 
and Accepted Masons, and Timon Lodge, Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. Vincent was married on January i, 1884, to Jennie M. Dowds, 
daughter of Samuel Newell- and Eliza A. (Popham) Dowds, of Pike town- 
ship. Knox county, one of the pioneer families of the county. To this union 
four children were born, namely: Mabel, Dwight D., Ethel and Lucile, all 
at home. The son is connected with the Cooper Engine Company, of Mt. 
Vernon, as bookkeeper. All are graduates of the Mt. Vernon high school 
except the youngest, who is still a student. 

Mr. Vincent affiliates with the Disciples church, but his family are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church and are active in its affairs. The 
family home is a pleasant and attractive one, situated at No. 724 East High 
street, Mt. Vernon, and this household is prominent in the best social life of 
the city and county. 



ALVA A. DOWDS. 



The best history of a community or state is the one that deals most with t 

the lives and activities of its people, especially of those who, by their own en- ; 

deavor and indomitable energy, have forged to the front and placed them- 
selves where they deserve the title of progressive men. In this brief review 
will be found the record of one who has outstripped the less active plodders 
on the highway of life and achieved a career surpassed by few of his con- 
temporaries, a career of marked success in the mercantile world, and a name 
which all who know him delight to honor owing to his upright life and habits 
of thrift and industry. 



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650 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Alva A. Dowds, one of Mt. Vernon's most progressive merchants, who, 
while yet a young man, has achieved marked success in the material affairs 
of life, was bom on April 6, 1875, i" Democracy, Knox county, Ohio, the son 
of Elijah W. and Mary E. (Barber) Dowds and a brother of S. G. Dowds, 
a sketch of whom appears in another part of this work. 

Alva A. Dowds was educated in the public schools of his native town 
and at the age of eighteen, in 1893, he came to Mt. Vernon, ostensibly to 
attend school, but he spent only one day in the school room, for he was anxious 
to enter the business arena, so he secured a clerkship in the clothing store 
of A. M. Stadler, but remained there only a short time when he went with 
L. A. Quail in the same business, remaining with him three years, then 
went with W. D. Browning as a clerk in his dry goods store. He learned 
the various phases of the mercantile business in these several positions and 
gave his employers eminent satisfaction. He then formed a partnership 
with F. E. Kiirby, under the firm name of Kirby & Dowds, in the wall paper 
china and queensware business. This partnership continued successfully 
for four years when Mr. Dowds formed a partnership with his former em- 
ployer, W. D. Browning, in the dry goods business as Browning & Company, 
which continued about two years, or until the death of Mr. Browning, where- 
upon Mr. Dowds organized the A. A. Dowds Dry Goods Company, as suc- 
cessor to Browning & Company. From the organization of this company, 
Mr. Dowds has been the president and general manager of the same. As- 
sociated with him in the active conduct of the business is J. W. Ruden, vice- 
president and assistant manager, he being formerly of Columbus, Ohio: 
also Edward L. Beldin, secretary and treasurer of the company, formerly 
of Buffalo, New York, he having come to Mt. Vernon about four years ago. 
The company first began business in the room at the southwest corner of 
Main and Gambier streets, but later moved to its present commodious, at- 
tractive and well-arranged quarters at Nos. 211-213 South Main street. They 
conduct a real department store, including everything kept in an up-to-date 
dry goods store, all kinds of ready-to-wear suits and garments for women, 
carpets and all kinds of floor coverings, window hangings and a full line of 
china and (fueensware, always carrying a large and carefully selected stock 
which is tastefully stored in their large double frontage building of four 
stories, occupying the entire space. The building is modern, equipped with 
elevators and all conveniences. The store rooms, store eciuipment and 
quantity and quality of goods carried would be creditable to a citv manv 
times the size of Mt. Vernon, and their very large and ever increasing trade 
evidences that the public appreciates the efforts of these enterprising gentle- 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 65 1 

men along these progressive business lines. Here customers gather from 
remote parts of the county, making this splendid estaWishment a sort of 
headquarters while in the county seat, and here they always find a generous 
welcome, courteous and considerate clerks and obtain full values for their 
expenditures. 

Mr. Dowds also has various other business interests, including a valu- 
able, well improved and highly productive farm to which he gives consid- 
erable of his time and attention. He is also interested in the Kelser-Dowds 
Company, wholesale grocers, doing an extensive business in Mt. Vernon; 
also other interests and enterprises have his support. With duties that 
would greatly confuse, if not distract outright the ordinary man, Mr. Dowds 
has his affairs under such a superb system that he experiences no difficulty 
in their successful management. He has rare innate business acumen and 
foresight and is easily one of the leading business men of this section of the 
state. 

Politically, Mr. Dowds is a Republican and, while not an active partici- 
I>ant in party affairs, he is always interested and keeps thoroughly informed 
on the questions of public importance. While he has never been an office 
seeker, he is at present a member of the Mt. Vernon city council, and a wide- 
awake member, always on the alert for the interests of the city and the peo- 
ple of this community and always ready to assist in any movement having 
as its object the general good of the locality honored by his citizenship. 

Mr. Dowds is an active member of the Mt. Vernon Citizens Association, 
and for some time was a member of the executive committee of this organiza- 
tion, which has for its object the betterment of business conditions and the 
advancement of the city commercially and along all lines that are for the 
betterment of conditions. Fraternally, he belongs to the Masonic order, the 
Knights Templar and the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine; he is also a member of the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen 
of America and the Royal Arcanum. 

Mr. Dowds was married on February 5, 1901, to Olive Clark, a lady of 
culture and refinement, the daughter of Walter and Mary (Baily) Clark, 
formerly a well known Mt. Vernon family, both parents being now deceased. 
This union has been graced by the birth of two children, Mary E. and Alva 
A., Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dowds are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
he being a steward of the same. They have a beautiful and neatly kept home 
at the comer of North Gay street and Wooster avenue, Mt. Vernon. 

Personally, Mr. Dowds is a man of pleasing address, kind, generous, 
obliging, commanding the respect and good will of the entire community. 



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652 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

CHARLES M, GRAY, D. D. S. 

In a locality ranking high for its professional talent, whose dentists take 
conspicuous places among their colleagues throughout the state, is Dr. Charles 
M. Gray, who is located at Mt. Vernon, Knox county, where he is enjoying 
a lucrative practice and, although a young man, is rapidly taking his position 
as one of the representative citizens of this locality whose interests he seems 
to have at heart. 

Doctor Gray was born April 23, 1879, ^" Muskingum county, Ohio, the 
son of James and Medolia (Hicks) Gray, both natives of Muskingum count}', 
where the father was a successful farmer and prominent in public affairs, 
being an ardent Republican. For many years he served as justice of the 
peace. He stood high in the county and his character was above reproach. 

Charles M. Gray grew to maturity on the home farm, which he worked 
during the crop seasons, and attended the district schools in the winter time, 
remaining under the parental roof until he was twenty years of age, when he 
took a position as foreman of the decorating department of the J. B. Owens 
Pottery Company at Zanesville, Ohio, where he remained three years, having 
as many as forty men under him, and his services were eminently satisfactory- 
to the management. In 1904 he left this establishment, and, having always 
had a desire and ambition to become a dentist, he entered the office of Eh-. J. 
J. Hill, of Zanesville, and later that of Dr. Charles Hill, of Wheeling, West 
Virginia, having spent a year in the office of the former and a year and a 
half in that of the latter. In the fall of 1906 he entered the dental depart- 
ment of the Starling Medical College, at Columbus, Ohio, to complete his 
dental course, and he remained a student there three years, graduating there 
with a splendid record in the spring of 1909. Soon afterward he located at 
Mt. Vernon, opening a neat office for the practice of his profession at Xo. 
Ill 1-2 South Main street and he has since remained in the same location. 
His office is admirably arranged, modern in every appointment and all equip- 
ment is thoroughly up-to-date, his apparatus being of the best and latest 
models. Notwithstanding the fact that he has been in Mt. Vernon a com- 
paratively short time. Doctor Gray has built up a very large and lucrative 
patronage which is continually growing, he and his assistant being kept con- 
stantly busy. 

Personally, Doctor Gray is a genial and affable gentleman and, being 
skilled and honest in his work, he has no trouble in securing and retaining 
patients. 

Adhering to the political faith of his father. Doctor Gray is a Republi- 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 653 

call, but is not active in political affairs, though he is always interested and 
well informed on public matters. Fraternally, he is a member of the Masonic 
order and has attained to the Knight Templar degree. He' affiliates with the 
Methodist Episcopal church. He has remained unmarried. 



CHARLES ALBERT BECK, D. D. S. 

Occupying a conspicuous place among the leading dentists of Knox and 
adjoining counties. Dr. Charles Albert Beck, of Mt. Vernon, enjoys the 
confidence and esteem of all who know him. His record demonstrates that 
where there is a will there is a way and that obstacles to success may be over- 
come by courage and self-reliance. 

Doctor Beck was born July 28, 1879, two miles east of Mt. Vernon and 
is the representative of an excellent old family of this county, being the son 
of James C. and Elizabeth (Fox) Beck. The father was bom in Gaston 
county, Michigan, and the mother in Zanesville, Muskingum county, Ohio. 
James C. Beck came to Knox county, Ohio, with his parents in 1855 and as a 
young man learned the carpenter's trade, becoming one of the leading car- 
penters and contractors in this locality, many of the substantial business 
houses and dwellings of the county standing as monuments to his skill as an 
architect. He married Elizabeth Fox in 1876. Politically, he was a Demo- 
crat and was past noble grand of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He 
helped organize the local lodge; he was the first presiding officer of the car- 
penter's union of Mt. Vernon and was active in many local matters. He 
moved to Mt. Vernon about 1880, where he spent the balance of his life, 
actively engaged as a contractor. His death occurred on July lo,- 1906; his 
widow, five sons and one daughter survive; the children are Melvirt, of Fred- 
ericktown; Charles A., Mary L. ; Harry C. is married and lives in Mt. Ver- 
non; Earl C. and George F., all of Mt. Vernon. 

' Dr. Charles A. . Beck was educated in the Mt. Vernon public schools, 
graduating from the high school in 1900. He then entered the dental de- 
partment of the Ohio State University at Columbus, where he made an ex- 
cellent record, graduating with the class of 1903 with the degree of Doctor 
of Derital Surgery. Immediately after his graduation he opened an office at 
No. 14 South Main street. Mt. Vernon, for the practice of his profession 
and he' has been in the same location ever since. He. has a thoroughly 
equipi:)ed office, all instruments and office supplies known to modern dentistrv 



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654 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

being at his command. He has been very successful and now enjoys a very 
lucrative and extensive practice with the city and surrounding country. He 
owns several pieces of valuable real estate and is among Mt. Vernon's most 
substantial young men. He is a past master of Mt. Zion Lodge No. 9, Free 
and Accepted Masons, and is a member of the Knights Templar, and is very 
active in lodge circles. He has been recording secretary of Quindaro Lodge 
No. 316, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, for eight years and is still in 
that office. He is also a member of the Homestead Club, composed of young 
men of Mt. Vernon. Politically, he is a Democrat and takes an active interest 
in public affairs. In 1908 he was elected a member of the Mt. Vernon board 
of education for a term of four years, being the first Democrat ever elected a 
member of that board. 

Doctor Beck was married on June 30, 1909, to Faith Willison, daughter 
of William B. and Alberta (Green) Willison, of Croton, Ohio, a highly re- 
spected family there. The Doctor and wife are earnest members of the Con- 
gregational church and active in church and Sunday school work; they have 
a pleasant and neatly kept home at No. 304 North Gay street, and they are 
both popular with the best social circle of the city. 



ISABELLE B. NIXON. M. D. 

From the remote age of Pericles, when Aspasia and the poetess Sappho 
startled the world by a display of brilliancy of intellect that had never been 
known before that period and has never been equalled, women have been 
playing a more important role in the drama of civilization, though for cen- 
turies their progress was indeed slow. It has been during only the past few 
decades that they have proven themselves capable of filling almost any posi- 
tion and doing about everything that men do. They have become factors in 
the political world and are holding some of the highest offices within the gift 
of the people ; in literature, they have long ranked among the top-notchers, 
each succeeding year bringing out their names among the "best sellers \* on 
the stage they have been leaders throughout the world for a long time ; and in 
the realm of the sciences they have displayed remarkable tact and made help- 
ful experiments and discoveries ; they have invaded the professions and women 
lawyers, dentists, doctors, etc., are to be found in almost every great me- 
tropolis. This, of course, is confined more to America than any where else 
on our planet, for here everybody is given a "fighting chance'* at everything. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 655 

In the above class Mt. Vernon, Ohio, has a most creditable and worthy 
representative and the medical profession an advocate of which it may well 
l)e proud in the person of Isabelle B. Nixon, one of the best known and 
most popular of Knox county women. She was born in Lima, Allen county, 
this state, and is the daughter of Michael and Clara (Beaty) Nixon, both 
parents natives of Ohio, the father's birth occurring in Holmes county and 
the mother first saw the light of day in Morrow county. For a time Mr. 
Nixon was landlord of the Lima hotel in Lima, and in 1877 the family came 
to Mt. Vernon and the father engaged in the dry goods business, in which he 
remained for a period of thirty years, retiring to private life in April, 1910. 
He built up an extensive patronage and was one of the best known merchants 
in the county, and he is a highly respected and well known citizen of Mt. 
Vernon, whose interests he has never hesitated to promote. 

John Beaty, the subject's maternal grandfather, was a pioneer of this 
state, coming here from Washington county, Pennsylvania. He was a man 
of unusual industry, courage and fortitude, and he became influential in the 
affSiirs of Knox county, which he served as treasurer for four years. He 
was also engaged in the mercantile business and was a land owner of con- 
siderable proportions. He was widely known and highly respected. In 
politics he was a Republican and in church affairs was a devoted Congrega- 
tionalist and was one of the founders of the church in Mt. Vernon. 

Michael Nixon, mentioned above, was a loyal Democrat, but he had no 
aspirations to be a public man and never held office. He is also a Congre- 
gationalist and active in church work and a liberal supporter of the same. 
He has only one child, Isabelle Beaty Nixon, the immediate subject of this 
sketch. She was educated in the public schools of Mt. Vernon, from which 
she was graduated with the class of 1893, ^^^^ which she entered the Cleve- 
land Homeopathic Medical College, where she made a splendid record and 
was graduated with a class of fifty-one in 1899, she being the honor member 
of the class. After her graduation she took a rest of six months, then opened 
an offke in Mt. Vernon for the practice of her profession, and remained here 
two and one-half years, having a splendid start; but, desiring a broader field 
for the exercise of her talents, she then went to the city of Cleveland, and 
there, for nineteen months, she had charge of the children at the "infant's 
rest," remaining in the Lake City two and one-half years, during which time 
she took a course of special work, covering a period of twenty-two months. 
Then she returned to Mt. Vernon, where she opened on office and where she 
has since remained and has been very successfully engaged in practice. She 
makes a spedahy of the ailments of children and women and she has met 



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656 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

with pronounced success, building up an extensive and ever-growing practice 
and gaining the confidence and good will of the public. She is an indefatiga- 
ble student and keeps thoroughly up-to-date in all phases of the profession, 
in which she ranks high and has an honored standing. Her office and resi- 
dence is at No. 403 East First street. It is remarkable that after a practice of 
twelve years she has signed only three death certificates. She is a member 
of the Congregational church and an active church worker. She belongs to 
the Woman's Christian Association and the Mt. Vernon Humane Societ>% 
her parents also both belonging to the latter. 

The Doctor is a woman of broad intelligence and liberal education, 
thoroughly trained in her profession, takes an active interest in all move- 
ments calculated to uplift her sex and, Ijeing of a pleasing, genial and at- 
tractive address, she is popular with a wide circle of friends and admirers. 



WILLIAM A. BOUNDS. 

There are no citizens of Knox county who are more highly respected 
and whose genuine worth is more widely recognized than that of William A. 
Bounds, president of the Knox Mutual Insurance Company of Mt. Vernon, 
who, although advanced in years, is active and hale as the result of a life of 
clean living and pure thinking. His worthy career has been such that the 
younger generation in the locality of which this history treats can emulate it 
with profit to themselves and their fellow men, owing to the fact that his life 
has been successful from a material standpoint and singularly free from all 
that would deteriorate from the highest standards of living and he has shown 
what the life of a good citizen should be socially and in the sphere of material 
business as well as a patriotic supporter of those moverrients having for their 
aim the general good and upbuilding of the country. ' 

Mr. Bounds is the scion of a sterling old Southern family, he himself 
having l>een born in Brooke county, Virginia, January 28, 1^28, and he is 
the son of James and Rachael (Browning) Bounds, who came to Ohio in 
1840 and settled in Licking county, where they spent the rest' of their lives, 
the father being a carpenter by trade, and he was well known and Tilghlv re- 
spected in his community which he helped develop in those early days. 

William A. Bounds obtained a very limited education in the- public 
schools of his native locality, and when fourteen years of age he began learn- 
ing the carpenter's trade under his father and he has followed the same all his 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 657 

life, being a very skilled workman, so that his services have ever been in great 
demand. 

On May 3, 1849, M'"- Bounds was married to Mary Jane Simmons, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Tilman Simmons, of Homer, Licking county, 
Ohio. In October, 1849, Mr. Bounds brought his young wife to Mt. Vernon, 
Knox county, and began working at the carpenter's trade and contracting, and 
thus for over sixty years he has been identified with the growth of this city, 
having erected many of the best and most important public buildings, busi- 
ness blocks, machine shops, concrete buildings, besides many of the most sub- 
stantial and attractive residences of this city and surrounding country and 
cities, which will long stand as monuments to his skill as an architect, which 
is second to none. He is one of the directors of the Knox Mutual Insurance 
Company and, as above indicated, is now president of the company, which 
was organized in 1836 and has long been doing a most successful insurance 
business all over the state of Ohio. Its recent rapid growth in importance 
and popularity has been due to the able and judicious management of Mr. 
Bounds. 

Politically, the subject is a Republican and he has long been active in 
public matters, his services having been especially effective in the campaign 
of 1884, when James G. Blaine was the Republican presidential candidate. 
At that time Mt. Vernon had the banner Blaine and Logan club, Mr. Bounds 
having been prominent in its organization and general work of the club. 
Blaine's defeat was a sore disappointment to him. He served in the city 
council for three terms; he was fire chief for fifteen years and a member of 
the fire department for twenty-five years. He served as a member of the 
board of health for three terms and as a member of the board of public ser- 
vice for three terms. In all positions of public trust he performed his duties 
in a most satisfactory manner. Although he never sought office, offices 
sought him and he always responded to the public duty. He has been a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias lodge since 1876. 

One daughter, Eva, was born to Mr. and Mrs. Bounds; she married X. 
\V. Allen, a carpenter, who was at one time sheriff of Knox county. 

The wife of Mr. Bounds passed away on May ly, 1910, after traversing 
the royal road of life with him for sixty years, sharing his joys and sor- 
rows, his victories and defeats, at all times proving to be a most helpful and 
genial companion. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church for 
fifty-two years and a women of strong Christian faith. The religion of Mr. 
Bounds is founded upon the Golden Rule and his life has been characterized 
by carrying its sublime precept into his e very-day affairs. 



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658 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

The family home, a large, pleasant dwelHng, is at No. 119 East Burgess 
street, where he has lived since May 3, 1852, the anniversary of his wedding, 
and he has lived here continuously ever since. The impress that he has left 
upon this community will continue to bear fruit throughout the generations 
to come. 



AMAZIAH H. SIMMONS. 

It is a well authenticated fact that success comes as the result of legiti- 
mate and well applied energj% unflagging determination and perseverance. 
She is never known to smile upon the idler or dreamer, she never courts the 
loafer, and only those who have diligently sought her favor are crowned with 
her blessings. In tracing the history of Amaziah H. Simmons, well known 
colored man of Mt. Vernon, Knox county, it is plainly seen that the prosperity 
which he enjoys has been won by commendable qualities and it is also his 
personal worth that has gained for him the high respect of those with whom 
he has come into contact. 

Mr. Simmons was born August 2, i860, in Morgan county, Ohio, the 
son of Jonathan P. and Rhoda (Jones) Simmons. This family moved to Mt. 
Vernon in 1870 and have since resided here, the parents now being deceased. 
Their family consisted of five children, one dying in infancy; Jemima J., now^ 
Mrs. Charles Jackson, of Youngstown, Ohio; Rilla J. is deceased; Samuel J. 
lives in Mt. Vernon, and Amaziah H., of this review. 

The subject received his education in the public schools of Mt. Vernon 
and he spent one year in the high school. When ten years of age he went 
into the family of Morgan Rowe, a lawyer of Mt. Vernon, with whom he 
lived two years, then went to the home of Mrs. Robert Thompson, where he 
remained a year. In the spring of 1874 he went to live with Dr. F. C. Lari- 
more and remained there for over six years, during which time he attended 
the public schools, and, being a diligent student, he made the eight years' 
grades to the high school in six years. Following this he found employment 
with John Denney, proprietor of the Curtis House, as night clerk and here 
he remained one winter. In the spring of 1881 he went to live with Frank L. 
Fairchild as a houseman for the summer, when he was taken sick, which 
caused him to give up his place and he was sick all winter. During the 
summer of 1882 he worked at whatever he could get to do. In the spring of 
1883 h^ w^^^ w^^h ^^^ ^^^ ^^ Armstrong & Miller, grocers, driving a de- 
livery wagon for them for ten years. In the spring of 1893 he engaged in 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 659 

the restaurant business for himself at No. 6 South Main street, Mt. Vernon, 
which he continued three years. In 1896 he sold his restaurant and engaged 
in the fish and poultry business for three years, when he sold out and entered 
the employ of Mrs. Gen. George W. Morgan, remaining with her six years. 
Since 1905 he has been engaged in looking after his real estate holdings, 
which are extensive; he has also engaged in handling real estate for others. 
He has been very successful in his real estate investments and has accumu- 
lated considerable property and is now one of the financially solid men of his 
city. This has been done through his individual efforts in the face of all 
kinds of discouragements, but he has been persistent and has managed well. 

Politically, Mr. Simmons is a Republican, but has never been active in 
the ranks. He is a member of the Grand United Order of Odd Fellows, also 
the Knights of Pythias and the Household of Ruth. He has filled all the 
chairs in these lodges and has been representative to the grand lodges. In 
1892 he was the representative to the biannual movable committee of the 
Grand United Order of Odd Fellows, which met in Washington, D. C. He 
has represented the Knights of Pythias lodge in the grand lodge. He has 
long been an active lodge worker and stands high in fraternal circles. 

Mr. Simmons was married on July 23, 1883, to Sarah J. Ramsey, of 
Mt. Vernon, who passed to her rest on October 16, 1907, without issue. He 
is a member of the African Methodist Episcopal church and is a member of 
the church's official board. He has been superintendent of the Sunday school 
for fifteen years, and has been an ardent church and Sunday school worker. 
He has a modem, well furnished residence at No. no East Front street. He 
is a man of whom his race may well be proud, and he has done a great deal of 
good for his people in this vicinity. 



LEGRANI) BRITTON. 

Wherever Legrand Britton, farmer and stock man of Howard town- 
ship, Knox county, is known his word is as good as his bond, and his reputa- 
tion for truth and veracity has never been impeached. It is such men as he 
that give stability and character to a community and, although their names 
may not adorn national or state history, their deeds cause them to be num- 
bered among the best citizens in the true sense of the word ; they are worthy 
because humble, for greatness consists largely of humility. He has not de- 
pended upon the labor of others to place him where he is, but has worked 



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66o KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

diligently all his life, earning his bread by the sweat of his brow and led an 
upright career, so that he has the respect of his neighbors and friends. 

Mr. Britton was born on August 28, 1856, on the farm in Howard town- 
ship, this county, where he has spent practically all his life. He is the son of 
Lewis and Elizabeth (Critchfield) Britton, the father a native of MillwocKl, 
this county, being the first child born in the village of Millwood, and he was 
the first postmaster of the same. Grandfather James Britton came from 
Marjland to Knox county in a very early day and he built the first house in 
Millwood. He was a blacksmith by trade. The log cabin home which he 
built there still stands. He lived there until about 1840, when he moved to 
Iowa, making the overland trip in a **prairie-schooner," camping along the 
way. He was a typical pioneer and when civilization crowded too close 
around him he sought a new country, spending his last years in Iowa, dying 
there in 1878. 

Lewis Britton, father of the subject, maintained a store in Millwood for 
a number of years, later moving to Mt. Vernon, where he was in business 
many years. In 1876 he was elected treasurer of Knox county, serving one 
term. While in business in Mt. Vernon he lived on his farm in Howard 
township, three miles west of Howard, and there he spent the latter years of 
his life in retirement, his death occurring on September 28. 1901, his wife 
preceding him on April 17, 1897, and both are buried in Pleasant Valley 
cemetery. His wife, Elizabeth Critchfield, was a member of an early pioneer 
family, prominent in the aflfairs of the township. The farm where. the subject 
lives was entered from the government by her father, Isaac Critchfield, who 
came from Pennsylvania very early, and who here became prominent and 
prosperous. The farm has remained in possession of the family to the 
present time. 

Four children were bom to Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Britton, namely: Le- 
grand, of this sketch; Samuel H., a physician of Marion; Eva, who married 
James Berry, of Howard township; Nannie, now Mrs. Columbus D. Mc- 
Cullough, of Elyria, Ohio. 

Legrand Britton was reared on the home farm and educated in the 
country district schools, and he remained with his parents until his marriage, 
on August 24, 1876, to Ella Critchfield, daughter of Harris and Sarah Jane 
CMcCarty) Critchfield, and to this union four children have been born, 
namely: Lewis H., a physician of Marion, Ohio; Bertha, who married James 
Mitchell, of Marion; Tamsey is deceased; Carl H. is married and is at home. 

Mr. Britton farmed on the home place for some time and in 1883 he 
engaged in the general mefrcantile and grain business with George W. Mc- 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 66l 

Nabb in Howard for two years. In 1885 he moved to Marion county, Ohio, 
and there engaged in the general mercantile business and was postmaster at 
Adelaide, that county, for some time. He remained in Marion county about 
eight years and in 1895 he returned to the home farm in Howard township, 
where he was born and here he has since remained, successfully engaged in 
general farming and stock raising, his fine farm consisting of over one hun- 
dred acres of well improved land and he has a good home. 

Politically, Mr. Britton is a Democrat and he has been active in public 
matters since reaching maturity. For a number of years he served as a 
member of the Democratic county central committee as chairman and has 
been a frequent delegate to county, district and state conventions. He served 
as trustee of Howard township for thirteen years in succession prior to mov- 
ing to Marion county, resigning when he left the county, and he proved to be 
a most faithful official. He has been township assessor for four years and 
was land appraiser of Howard township in 1910. He has served as a mem- 
l>er of the township board of education for a number of years, being presi- 
dent of the board. In the fall of 1910 he was elected a member of the county 
board of commissioners, and he took office on September 18, 191 1, and is 
discharging the duties of the same in a very able and conscientious manner. 
He is a member of the Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of 
America. He and his family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
of Howard and he was trustee of the church for some years. He has been an 
active church and Sunday school worker, and is a public-spirited, broad- 
minded man who believes in progress and right living. 



HOMER C. SMITH. 



The present age is essentially utilitarian and in the life of every suc- 
cessful man carries a lesson which, told in contemporary narrative, is pro- 
ductive of much good in shaping the destiny of others. There is, therefore, 
a due measure of satisfaction in presenting, even in brief resume, the life and 
achievements of such men, and in preparing the following history of the suc- 
cessful young business man of Centerburg whose name initiates this para- 
orraph, it is with the hope that it may prove not only interesting and instruc- 
tive, but also serv^e as an incentive to those who contemplate a business career. 
Mr. Smith possesses concentration of purpose and energy that laughs at re- 
straint, excellent judgment and the executive ability that makes everything 
undertaken accomplish the purpose for which intended. 



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662 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Mr. Smith was born in Centerburg, this county, on October 5, 1877. He 
is the son of William and Esther (Hopkins) Smith, both natives of Greene 
county, Pennsylvania, where they grew up, were educated and married, com- 
ing to Bloomfield, Morrow county, Ohio, in 1867, where they remained until 
1875, when they moved to Centerburg, where Mr. Smith engaged in the 
grain business and afterward the clothing business until his death, on April 
16, 1896. He did a large business and was one of the leading men of the 
community, well known and highly respected. Politically, he was a Republi- 
can and for years was active in local political affairs. He filled the office of 
mayor of Centerburg in a most commendable manner and for some time was 
a member of the town council, also of the board of education. Fraternally, 
he belonged to Bloomfield Lodge No. 422, Free and Accepted Masons, and 
he was a member of the Methodist Episco]>al church and superintendent of 
the Sunday school for a period of twenty-two years. He was a devout man 
and active in church affairs, and a man of unquestioned integrity. During 
'the Civil war he proved his loyalty to the Union and made a faithful soldier in 
Company H, One Hundred and Twenty-third Regiment Pennsylvania Volun- 
teer Infantry. His widow survives, making her home at Centerburg. 

Homer C. Smith, of this sketch, was reared in Centerburg — in fact, has 
always lived here. He was educated in the public schools and was graduated 
from the local high school in 1894. T^ollowing his graduation he engaged in 
the grocery business from 1894 until 1907, enjoying an excellent trade with 
the town and surrounding country. He next turned his attention to the shoe 
and the produce business, the latter growing to large proportions. In Jan- 
uar>% 191 1, he established the Arch City Produce Company at Columbus for 
the purpose of handling butter and eggs to jobbers, and it proved to be most 
successful from the first, an extensive trade soon l)eing established. He still 
maintains his shoe store in Centerburg, which is one of the Ijest known in 
the county, customers from a wide radius coming here, for they always find 
a large, up-to-date and carefully selected stock and courteous and obliging 
clerks. The very best shoes are handled and this splendid store would do 
credit to a town much larger than Centerburg. 

Mr. Smith was married on June 24, 1908, to Feme Miller, daughter of 
William and Mary (Payne) Miller, her father being a prominent dry goods 
merchant of Centerburg. 

Politically, Mr. Smith is a Republican and he is active in public affairs, 
endorsing and sup[)orting all progressive movements. He has filled many of 
the local offices and is at present a memlx^r of the town council and school 
board. As a public servant he has discharged his every duty in a faithful 
and conscientious manner, to the satisfaction of all the people. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 663 

Fraternally, Mr. Smith is a member of Bloomfield Lodge No. 422, Free 
and Accepted Masons, and he and his wife are members of Manila Chapter 
No. 100, Eastern Star. He is a member of Hawthorne Lodge No. 228, 
Knights of Pythias, and the Sons of Veterans. He and his wife belong to 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and he has been superintendent of the Sun- 
day school for a number of years, succeeding his father. He is also a mem- 
ber of the official board of the church.^ He and his estimable wife are prom- 
inent in local social circles. They have a pleasant home and are most affable 
and hospitable, numbering their friends only by the limits of their acquaint- 
ance. 



ARTHUR W. BROWN, D. D. S. 

To attain a worthy citizenship by a life that is always honored and 
respected even from childhood deserves more than mere mention. It is no 
easy task to resist the many temptations of youth and early manhood and 
plant a character in the minds and hearts of associates that will remain an 
unstained figure for all time. One may take his place in public life through 
some vigorous stroke of public policy, and even remain in the hearts of 
friends and neighbors, but to take the same position by dint of the practice of 
an upright life and without a craving for exaltation and popularity is worthy 
of the highest praise and commendation. Arthur W. Brown, of Centerburg, 
recognized throughout Knox county as one of the leading dentists of the 
younger professional fraternity in this locality, has won the honor and respect 
of the people here since casting his lot among them a few years ago, not be- 
cause of the vigorous training of his si>ecial talents, but because of his daily 
life, passed upon in the light of real true manhood. 

Doctor Brown was born on September 5, 1881, in Maple Rapids, Michi- 
gan. He is the son of D. D. and Isabelle (Frazier) Brown, both of Scotch 
ancestry; neither ever became residents of Ohio. The father is deceased, 
having died when his son, Arthur W., was only seven years old. The mother 
survives. 

Dr. Arthur W. Brown was educated in the schools of Maple Rapids, 
Michigan, and was graduated from the high school in 1898. He then entered 
the University of Michigan in 1901, department of dentistry, in which he 
remained one year. In the fall of 1902 he entered the dental department of 
the Ohio Medical College at Columbus, Ohio, and was graduated from the 
same in 1904, having made an excellent record, winning the admiration of 

(43) 



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664 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

his colleagues and the praise of the instructors. Thus well equipped for his 
chosen life work he located the year of his graduation at Centerburg, Knox 
county, this state, and here he has continued to successfully practice his pro- 
fession, having enjoyed a large and ever-growing patronage from the first 
and taking his place in the front rank of dentists in this and adjoining coun- 
ties. He has a neat, well arranged and modemly equipped office, in fact, 
every approved appliance for the prompt, safe and skillful performance of 
all phases of dental work. 

Doctor Brown was married on June 5, 1907, to Edna Florence Faraba, 
daughter of Marion and Claude (Brentlinger) Faraba, a highly respected 
family, and this union has been graced by the birth of two children, Faraba 
Devon and Marian Isabelle Brown. 

Fraternally, Doctor Brown is a member of the Masonic order and the 
Knights of Pythias, and politically he is a Republican. He belongs to the 
Ohio State Dental Society, and while in college he was a member of the Xi 
Psi Phi fraternity. He and his wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He is at present clerk of the town council at Centerburg. 

The Doctor is fond of athletics and was well known in this field while 
in school. Since coming to Centerburg he and his wife have made a host of 
warm personal friends and they take an active part in local social affairs. 



L. TATE CROMLEY. 



One of the best known of the younger professional men of Knox county 
is L. Tate Cromley, of Mt. Vernon, for many years a national figure in 
athletics. Combined with the excellent personal and official qualities of the 
successful attorney, he is infused with the genius of enterprise and is a man 
of enlarged public spirit. He always stands ready to identify himself with 
his fellow citizens in any good work and extends a co-operative hand to ad- 
vance any measure that will better the condition of things, that will give 
l)etter government, elevate mankind, insure higher standards of morality 
and the highest ideals of a refined, ennobling, intellectual culture. 

Mr. Cromley was bom on March 14, 1880, at Paulding, Ohio. He is 
the son of Joseph B. and Anna J. (Tate) Cromley, both natives of this state, 
the father born in Defiance county and the mother in Paulding county. The 
father devoted his business life to merchandising and he served two terms 
as clerk of courts of Paulding county. In politics he was a Republican and 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO.- 665 

was always active in party affairs. He was a member of the Republican 
county executive committee, and was a frequent delegate to party conventions. 
He was an admirer and breeder of fine horses in Paulding county, and was 
long a prominent man there in both private and public affairs. Fraternally, 
he belonged to both the Masonic and Independent Order of Odd Fellow 
lodges. His death occurred on November 6, 1891, and his widow subse- 
quently married Capt. O. G. Daniels, of Mt. Vernon, Ohio. 

Mr. Cromley, of this sketch, was reared in Paulding county, and he was 
graduated from the Paulding high school, class of 1897, then, coming to Mt. 
Vernon, he took an additional course in the high school here, and ifi the fall 
of 1899 he entered Kenyon College, from which he was graduated in 1903, 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, having made an excellent record, While 
in college he was a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon college fraternity 
and the honorary fraternity Phi Beta Kappa as a reward of high standing as 
a student. He was a member of the college athletic teams during his college 
course and was captain of the- baseball club for three years and manager of 
the club one year. He also acted as secretary to President Pierce of the 
college during his entire course, and while in school there he was elected 
justice of the peace of College township, in which capacity he served with 
much credit to himself and to the satisfaction of all concerned until leaving 
college, discharging his duties faithfully and in a fair and unbiased manner. 
He was salutatorian of his class at the commencement exercises. In the fall 
of 1905 Mr. Cromley entered Georgetown University at Washington for the 
course in law, remaining there one year. During his stay there he was a 
member of the baseball and football teams. During Easter week of 1904 
he shut out Princeton, Yale and Harvard baseball nines, one after the other, 
a feat never accomplished before or since. In the three games only ten hits 
were made off his pitching. In the fall of 1904 he joined the Indianapolis 
team of the American Association, as pitcher and he played with them four 
seasons. In the latter part of 1907 he finished up with the Kansas City team 
of the same league and in 1908 he played with the Rochester, New York, 
team of the Eastern league and closed his baseball career with the Toledo, 
Ohio, team of the American Association in the fall of 1908, having become 
one of the popular American players and widely known to the fans through- 
out the country, his record being a most enviable one. 

Mr. Cromley then turned his attention exclusively to the law, returning 
to the offices of H. H. & R. W. Greer, of Mt. Vernon, where he had really 
been a law student during the intervals and vacations for ten years. During 
his baseball career he was admitted to the bar in 1906 on examination at 



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666 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Columbus. During the winter of 1907 and 1908 he was bookkeeper in the 
First National Bank of Mt. Vernon, where he gave eminent satisfaction to 
officials, stockholders and patrons, leaving the same to resume baseball in the 
spring of 1908. 

Since then his attention has been given exclusively to his profession and 
has met with a large measure of success. As a lawyer he ranks deservedly 
well at the Knox county bar. His habits of study, research, ability to analyze 
and comprehend the law, to deduce and apply it, make him an informed, re- 
liable and certain lawyer, and necessarily popular. In his practice before the 
court he is characterized by fairness in stating the position of an adversar>% 
and strong enough and broad enough to desire no undue advantage. His ut- 
terances are expressive of a calm dignity, a tolerant spirit, but a fixed purpose. 
In his discussion of the law he is clear, precise and incisive, and to the jur\^ 
he is clear and deliberate. In his active practice of the law^ his character for 
personal and professional integrity has been fully recognized and appreciated. 
He has escaped the suspicion of ever having* knowingly failed to fulfill all 
proper obligations of his profession. 

Politically, Mr. Cromley is a Republican, but he has not been especially 
active. In the fall of 191 o he was elected prosecuting attorney of Knox 
county, the county giving the head of the Democratic ticket a majority of 
four hundred and ninety-nine, and Mr. Cromley received a majority on the 
Republican ticket of seven hundred and ten, a difference of twelve hundred 
votes. This is certainly criterion enough of his popularity and high standing 
in Knox county. He has discharged the duties of this important office in a 
manner that has reflected much credit upon his ability and to the satisfaction 
of all concerned, irresf)ective of party alignment. 

Fraternally, Mr. Cromley is a member of the Masonic order and the 
Knights of Pythias. In religious matters he belongs to the Presbyterian 
church. He has remained unmarried. Personally, he is a good mixer, genial, 
obliging and unassuming and is universally liked. 



FRANK O. PADGETT. 

Whether we are more indebted for the improvement of the age to the 
men of study or the men of action, these two classes being the most in- 
fluential in promoting the advancement of society and in giving character to 
the times in which they live, is a question of honest difference in opinion. 
Since neither can be spared, both should be encouraged to occupy their sev- 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. (>67 

eral spheres, zealously and without mutual distrust, spreading their influence 
and prosecuting their chosen labors. In the following paragraphs are briefly 
outlined the leading facts and characteristics in the career of a gentleman 
who combines in his makeup the elements of the energy of the studious, 
public-spirited man of affairs, a man who has made his influence felt for the 
upbuilding of the town of Danville and the county of Knox, and is not un- 
known to the wider field of journalism of the state, occupying, as he does, a 
prominent place in his profession. 

Frank O. Padgett, publisher of the Tri-Connty Leader, was born on 
February 12, 1875, in Columbus, Ohio. He is the son of Pius J. and Sarah J. 
(Weaver) Padgett, both parents natives of Ohio, and here they grew up. 
received their education in the public schools and were married. The father 
was a newspaper man of considerable reputation in various Ohio cities and a 
man of high standing. His death occurred in September, 1894. at his home 
in Zanesville. His widow is still living. 

Frank O. Padgett was eight years old when he moved with his parents 
to Zanesville and there he grew to manhood and was educated in the public 
schools. His first employment was a reporter on the Zanesville Signal, 
during the school vacations, and after leaving school he was regularly em- 
ployed as reporter on that paper. He was a senate page at Columbus while 
Hon. D. H. Gammer, the editor of the Signal, was a state senator. He went 
from Zanesville to Marion, Ohio, as reporter on the Daily Mirror. During 
the Spanish-American war Mr. Padgett was active in the field, having en- 
listed in Company G, Fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and he saw service in 
Porto Rico as a private. After the war he went to Delaware, Ohio, where he 
worked as reporter on the Daily Herald, of which paper his brother, George 
L. Padgett, was editor. He had achieved an envied reputation as an able 
news gatherer and writer, having possessed all the qualifications of the suc- 
cessful reporter — tact, diplomacy, untiring energy, perseverance and a genial 
address. 

In January, 1902, Mr. Padgett left Delaware and came to Danville, 
Knox county, and purchased the Danville Citizen, which he named the Tri- 
County Leader, with a view of covering the field in Knox, Coshocton and 
Holmes counties, the town of Danville being located near the borders of all 
these counties. He was successful here from the first and soon the circulation 
of the paper was increasing at a rapid rate, w^hich it has kept up, and he has 
made this one of the leading papers of its type in the state, brightened its 
mechanical appearance, rendered it a newsier and more valuable advertising 
medium, while its editorial page carries much weight in the affairs of the 



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bbS KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

three counties. It is independent in politics and fearlessly advocates what- 
ever seems to be for the best interests of the community which it so ably 
serves. He also conducts a large, modernly equipped job office in connection 
with his paper, prompt and high-grade work being his aim, and this depart- 
ment is extensively patronized. 

Mr. Padgett was married on February 28, 1901, to Anna Mary Dodd, 
daughter of James F. and Ruth E. (Murray) I>odd, a highly esteemed family 
of Delaware, Ohio. This union has been blessed by the birth of one daugh- 
ter, Ruth Ann. 

Politically, Mr. Padgett is a Democrat, but he is not a biased partisan. 
He is a public-spirited man and uses his paper for the general betterment of 
the community. He has never been an office seeker or an office holder. He 
and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



ORANGE H. ELLIOTT. 

The respect which should always be accorded the brave sons of the 
North who left homes and the peaceful pursuits of civil life to give their 
services, and their lives if need be, to preserve the integrity of the American 
Union is certainly due Orange H. Elliott, a venerable farmer and respected 
citizen of Monroe township, Knox county, where his long and industrious 
life has been spent. He proved his love and loyalty to the government on the 
long and tiresome marches in all kinds of situations, exposed to summer's 
withering heat and winter's freezing cold, on the lonely picket line, a target 
for the missile of the unseen foe, on the tented field and amid the flame and 
smoke of battle, where the rattle of the musketry mingled with the terrible 
concussion of the bursting shell and the deep diapason of the cannon's roar 
made up the sublime but awful chorus of death. All honor to the heroes of 
the early sixties. To them the country is under a debt of gratitude which it 
cannot pay, and in centuries yet to be posterity will commemorate their 
chivalry in fitting eulogy and tell their knightly deeds in song and story. To 
the once large but now rapidly diminishing army that followed "Old Glory'* 
on many bloody fields in the sunny South, crushed the armed host of treason 
and re-established upon a firm and enduring foundation the beloved govern- 
ment of our fathers, the subject of this sketch belonged. Like thousands of 
comrades equally as brave and patriotic as himself, he did his duty nobly and 
well and retired from the service with a record unspotted by a single vv- 
soldierly act. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 669 

Mr. Elliott was born in Monroe township, this county, on June i6, 1838. 
He is the son of James and Hannah Reed (Berry) Elliott, the father born 
in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and the mother in Knox county, 
Ohio. When eight years of age James Elliott came with his parents to 
Knox county. Grandfather William Elliott was a miller by trade and he 
built a mill on Owl creek, this being one of the very first mills in this locality. 
The father of this subject was also a miller and in addition an operator in a 
woolen mill. He worked for Orange Hollister, who conducted an early busi- 
ness establishment here. James Elliott later in life turned his attention to 
farming and became the owner of considerable land and was an active man 
of affairs. Politically, he was a Democrat in early life, but after i860 he 
voted the Republican ticket. He took considerable interest in public matters, 
and was a man of upright character and sound judgment. His death oc- 
curred in February, 1887, his wnfe preceding him to the grave about twelve 
years. 

To James Elliott and wife ten children were born, only four of whom 
are now living, Orange H., of this sketch, being the eldest of the serviving 
children. The others are Elizabeth, who has remained single; Alice Mary, 
who married Leander Farquar, of Gambier, died November 8, 191 1; Alex- 
ander lives in Mt. Vernon. 

Orange H. Elliott, of this sketch, was reared on the home farm, on 
which he worked hard when a boy during the crop .seasons, receiving such 
education as he could in the old-time schools of his neighborhood. 

Mr. Elliott enlisted in Company C, Thirty-second Ohio Volunteer In- 
fantry, in the fall of 1861 and he served over two years in the Army of 
Western Virginia, taking part in many hard-fought engagements and trying 
campaigns, finally being discharged for disability. He was taken prisoner at 
Harper's Ferry in 1862, the entire command of nearly twelve thousand men, 
including his whole regiment, l>eing captured. He was immediately paroled 
and exchanged in due time, returning to his company and regiment. He re- 
turned home and, after regaining his health, he resumed farming, remaining 
at home until his marriage, on March 17, 1865, to Emily J. Hartsook, daugh- 
ter of William and Amy (Ganoe) Hartsook, a pioneer family of Monroe 
township. To the subject and wife was born one daughter, Amy R., who 
married John W. Totman, a farmer of Monroe township, this county. 

After his marriage Mr. Elliott lived one year in Milford township, 
then returned to Monroe township, where he located about two miles north 
of Gambier and engaged in general farming and stock raising of all kinds, 
and here he has continued to reside. He has a fine farm and has laid bv a 



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670 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

competency for his old age. He has always been a Democrat and is a great 
admirer of William J. Bryan, the great commoner. He has served as town- 
ship trustee and as a member of the school board. He has always been 
deeply interested in public matters. He has been a frequent delegate to 
county and district conventions. He and his family are members of the 
IXmkard church, in which he is a deacon and is active in church and Sunday 
school w^ork. 



ROLLIN S. CLEMENTS. 

Those who belong to the respectable middle class of society, being early 
taught the necessity of relying upon their own exertions, will be more apt to 
acquire that information and those business habits which alone can fit them 
for the discharge of life's duties, and, indeed, it has long been a noticeable 
fact that our great men in nearly all walks of life spring from this class. The 
subject of this sketch whose life history is herewith delineated is a worthy 
representative of the class from which the true noblemen of the republic 
spring. He is the present able and popular chief of police of Mt. Vernon. 

Rollin S. Clements was born July 26, 1875, on a farm four miles north 
of Mt. Vernon, Knox county, and he is the son of George W. and Paulina 
(Scott) Clements, both natives of this county, where they grew up, were 
educated and married and here the father engaged as a stone mason and 
farmer. Politically, he was a Democrat and he ver)^ ably served as justice of 
the peace in Monroe township for more than twelve years. He was a man 
of exemplary character and highly respected: his death occurred on May to. 
1900; his widow survives, making her home in Mt. Vernon. 

Rollin S. Clements grew to maturity in Monroe township, this county, 
and attended the district schools. He came to Mt. Vernon when fifteen 
years of age and attended the public schools for two years. In 1894 he 
began clerking for A. F. Sauffer in the clothing business, remaining with 
him until October 5, 1905, giving entire satisfaction. In the fall of that year 
he was appointed sheriff of Knox county to fill an unexpired term, and he 
performed his duties in such a capable and praiseworthy manner that in the 
fall of IQ06 he was elected to the office of sheriff, which term continued until 
January 4. 1909, having made a record that reflected much credit upon him- 
self and gave eminent satisfaction to all concerned, irrespective of party 
alignment. Upon the expiration of his term of office he engaged in the 
liverv business in Mt. Vernon for over a vear: then he went with the Ohio 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 67 1 

Fuel Supply Company in the leasing department and operated in Ohio and 
West Virginia and he continued with this company until April i, 191 1, when 
he was appointed chief of police of Mt. Vernon, which office he is holding in 
his usual satisfactory manner, giving it his closest attention and discharging 
his every duty with fidelity and a public spirit that elicits the hearty approval 
of the people. Politically, he is a Republican and he has been active in party 
affairs since attaining his majority. He was a member of -the city council 
from the sixth ward in 1902, serving one term, and wrfs city treasurer in 
1903 and 1904. He has always been regarded as a faithful and efficient pub- 
lic official. 

Fraternally, Mr. Clements is a member of the Knights of Pythias, the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, of which he has been exalted ruler: 
he also belongs to the Woodmen of the World, standing high in all these 
orders. 

Mr. Clements was married on June 25, 1896, to Mary C. Chase, daughter 
of O. C. and Jerusha (Holt) Chase, a highly honored family of Mt. Vernon, 
who came from Morrow county, Ohio. Mr. Chase is a tinner and is engaged 
in business in this city. Mr. and Mrs. Clements have the following children : 
Mildred B., Margaret, George W. and Marian E. 

The family home is at No. 201 East Hamtramck street. Mr. Clements is 
a man of high character and standing in the community and is faithful to 
every trust that has been reposed in him, seeking to do the right at all times 
as he sees and understands the right. 



LYMAN WORKMAN. 

Among those who first braved the wilds of Knox county when the 
Indians were still here and wild animals were everyday sights in the dense 
woods, was the progenitor of Lyman Workman, well known carpenter and 
builder of Brown township. At the time all of southern Ohio was an almost 
unbroken wilderness, with a general covering of heavy timber, but here and 
there interspersed with small open tracts or prairies. When the first Work- 
man arrived here the wigw^ams of different tribes of red men dotted the 
banks of every stream in the country. They fished and hunted and always 
brought in many kinds of game they killed. Joseph Workman, the subject's 
paternal grandfather, came from Maryland with his family in 1812, leaving 
his home in company with other emigrants for Ohio, but while enroute he 



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672 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

was drafted for service in the war of 1812, thus, leaving his family and teams, 
he returned to Maryland, secured a substitute, later rejoining his family and 
proceeded to Ohio. He first settled in Union township, south of Danville, 
Knox county, there entering one hundred and sixty acres of land from the 
government. This was wholly in the deep woods and the trees and brush 
had to be cleared off before a crop could be raised. Here he erected a log 
cabin and began to experience the hard work and privations of the life of a 
first settler. But there were many pleasures in the woods for all that, the 
pleasure of rearing his large family being not the least, for in such environ- 
ment a happy household may be established easier than in the midst of 
populous surroundings, for reasons too evident to recite here. There were 
eight sons and six daughters in Joseph Workman's family, a remarkable 
thing about this large family being that they all grew to manhood and 
womanhood and lived useful lives. Here the parents, Joseph and Sarah 
Workman, spent .the balance of their lives, becoming leaders in Union and 
adjoining townships, known for their integrity and hospitality, Joseph Work- 
man dying at the age of. sixty-six years, his widow surviving to quite an old 
age. 

Joseph Workman, Jr., father of Lyman Workman, the immediate 
subject of this sketch, was the first child of this large family to be bom after 
coming to Knox county. He grew up amid pioneer conditions and worked 
hard on the home place, in fact, he devoted his life to farming, married 
Christine Ross, who was bom in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, from which 
the Ross family came to Knox county, Ohio, alx)ut 1835. 

To Joseph, Jr., and Christine (Ross) Workman four sons and two 
(laughters were born to grow to maturity, others dying in infancy; those who 
survived were Elizabeth, now Mrs. Irvin Armstrong: Solomon R., of Brown 
township, this county: Lyman, of this review: Marilla married Jobe Grant, 
of Pike township; Channing lives in Seattle, Washington. The parents of 
these children are both deceased, the father having died in August, 1881, and 
the mother at an earlier date, in October, 1864. 

Lyman Workman, of this sketch, was born in Brown township, Knox 
county, Ohio, on July 16, 1845, <^" the home farm four miles north of Dan- 
ville, and there he grew to manhood, assisting with the general work about 
the place, and he received his education in the common schools during the 
s time that he was not assisting with the crops on the farm. He was married 
on November 15, 1874, to Victoria Vincent, daughter of S. M. and Rosanna 
(Lybarger) Vincent, a highly respected family of Brown township, this 
countv, and this union has resulted in the birth of four children, namelv: 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. G^T^ 

William V. is married and lives on the home farm; Myrtle is now Mrs. 
Albert J. Young, of Akron, Ohio; Samuel J. lives in Brown township, this 
county; Charles is single and is living at home. 

Early in life Lyman Workman learned the carpenter's trade and this he 
has followed to the present time, being one of the most efficient and popular 
carpenters and builders of this part of the county. Most of the best farm 
residences and large barns, also many public buildings in this locality, stand as 
monuments to his skill as a builder. He is one of the busiest contractors in 
the county. He also has a farm four miles north of Danville, where he has 
always resided, overseeing the operation of the same, which is a valuable, 
productive and well improved place, and here he has a substantial and pleas- 
ant home. 

Politically, Mr. Workman is a Democrat and he has long manifested an 
interest in public affairs. Something of the confidence in which he is held by 
the people of his community may be seen from the fact that he served as 
trustee of Brown township for a period of twenty years. He was also a 
member of the township school board for many years. His friends have, 
frequently urged his candidacy for county commissioner, but he has per- 
sistently refused. He is a progressive citizen, favoring all legitimate public 
improvements in so far as they are consistent to the public good. 



JOHN J. PFOUTS. 



Optometry has become within the past two or three decades a distinct 
and, indeed, an indispensable branch of science and those who have selected 
it as their life work and have taken the proper pains to prepare themselves for 
its successful application are meeting with gratifying results and are to be 
found in nearly every city. We of the present generation seem to be much 
more in need of their services than were our fathers and grandfathers. Young 
people in the days of the early settling of this country had no trouble, gen- 
erally or abstractly speaking, with their eyes, but for various reasons, which 
we would be presumptuous to attempt to explain or to account for here, the 
human race, as a whole, is not blessed with the perfect sight known in former 
epochs. 

A man of marked capacity and capability in this special profession is 
John J. P fonts, of Mt. Vernon, Knox county. He was bom on April 9, 
1883, near Wilmot, Stark county, Ohio, and he is the son of John and 
Samantha (Beidler) Pfouts, both natives of Stark county, and there they 



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674 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

grew up, were educated in the early schools and were married and there they 
s|)ent their lives engaged in agricultural pursuits, both being now deceased. 

Doctor Pfouts grew to maturity on the home farm, where he made 
himself useful in his boyhood days, and in that vicinity he attended the dis- 
trict schools. He was a very assiduous student and mastered the various 
branches quickly and easily, so that at the early age of sixteen years he began 
teaching school. Later he attended Wooster University at Wooster, Ohio, 
for tw^o years and there made an excellent record, after which he resumed 
teaching, w^hich he followed successfully for six years in all, and he ranked 
high among his contemporaries in this field of endeavor; but finally, tiring 
of the school room, he entered the Bradley Polytechnic Institute at Peoria. 
Illinois, from which he was graduated in optometry in 1907, with an ex- 
cellent record. He then went to Pittsburg. Pennsylvania, where he was em- 
ployed in a jewelry and optical store for one year, at the expiration of which 
he came to Mt. Vernon, Ohio, and opened jewelry and optical parlors at No. 
6 Vine street, where he has a neat, attractive and thoroughly and modemly 
equipped place of business. He gives his special attention to optical work 
and is a recognized expert and he has a large and rapidly growing clientage, 
his patrons coming from remote distances. His work has proven eminently 
satisfactory in every respect. 

Mr. Pfouts is a member of Mt. Vernon Lodge No. 140, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. He was married on September 28, 1910, to Susie 
Willaman, the accomplished daughter of J. S. and Sarah (Shick) Willaman, 
of New Berlin, Stark county, Ohio, where the father is one of the commun- 
ity's prosperous and highly respected fanners. The mother is also still living. 

Mr. Pfouts is a young man of pleasing address, makes and retains friends 
easily, is highly educated and is always a student, especially in the branches 
that pertain to his profession and he has won the respect of a large circle of 
acquaintances and friends since casting his lot in Mt. Vernon. 



SAMUEL H. ISRAEL. 

Prominent in the business life of Mt. Vernon and this locality, pre- 
eminently distingiu'shed for his splendid ability in carrying to completion im- 
portant enterprises and enjoying marked prestige in many things, aside from 
his pronounced financial talents, far beyond the limits of the community 
honored by his citizenship, Samuel H. I-srael stands out a clear and conspicn- 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 675 

ous figure among the successful men of a part of the great Buckeye state 
noted throughout the commonwealth for its high order of intelligence and 
business talent. 

Mr. Israel is the scion of one of the leading and most influential pioneer 
families in Knox county, and his birth occurred in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, on 
December i6, 1846, fn the same house where he has ever since resided, for 
he has never cared to leave "the roof that heard his earliest cry'' for any other 
place of abode, knowing well that **home is best." Here, at No. 208 North 
Main street, long lived his parents, Samuel and Elizabeth (Harper) Israel, 
and a brother of James Israel, a complete sketch of whom appears elsewhere 
in this work. 

Samuel H. Israel was educated in the public schools of Mt. Vernon and 
soon after leaving the school room he was engaged with his father in securing 
rights-of-way for the extension of the Cleveland, Akron & Columbus railroad 
from Millersburg, in Holmes county, through Mt. Vernon to Columbus. When 
these rights-of-way had been secured and the building of the road made possi- 
ble, he was engaged in contract construction work of the line, which work 
occupied him for two or three years, from 1871 to 1873, inclusive. Following 
this he was one of the promoters and organizers of the Knox County Savings 
Bank in 1873 and he became its first cashier, in which position he continued 
successfully until 1906, when he succeeded to the presidency of the bank, 
which position he now fills, and it is safe to say that the widespread popu- 
larity of this safe and conservative institution has been due very largely to 
his able and judicious management, until today its prestige stamps it as one 
of the sound financial institutions of this part of the state. From a rather 
small beginning it has grown to one of the leading banks in Knox county. It 
was first located at No. 8 North Main street, and there it continued to do 
business until 1906, when it moved to its present handsome and commodious 
quarters at No. 26 Public Square. A general banking business is carried on 
under the latest and most approved methods and its patrons are constantly 
increasing. 

Mr. Israel has also been treasurer of the Home Building and Loan Com- 
pany, another of the popular, solid and successful financial institutions of Mt. 
Vernon, he having held this position continuously since its organization in 
1885. With the growth, development and successful management of these 
two institutions Mr. Israel has been connected in a leading capacity since 
their organization and they have had his entire business attention and best 
thought and ability. He is known to be a careful, conservative and energetic 
business man, his methods always consistent with best banking methods. He 



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676 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

is by nature an organizer and promoter, a man of keen discernment and wise 
foresight, straightforward and honest to the letter in all his dealings, con- 
sequently he has ever enjoyed the confidence and good w^ill of those with 
whom he has come into contact. 

Mr. Israel was born and bred a Democrat and he did not depart from 
his raising until 1896, when he voted for William McKinley for President. 
He has never been an active partisan, but is well informed on public topics 
and campaign issues, and has always stood ready to lend his support to all 
measures looking to the general advancement of his county and state. While 
not a member of any church, he has always afiliated w^ith the Episcopal 
church, the choice of his parents. 

Mr. Israel has never married. Personally, he is a man of pleasing ad- 
dress, genial, generous and a good mixer, always unassuming. 



CHARLES K. SALISBURY. 

One of the most evident things to the thoughtful men of affairs is that 
life at no stage is a bed of roses. There are thorns, and many of them, along 
the pathway of every one, and the lucky ones are those who are pierced by 
the few^est and avoid the most. It will probably not be disputed that all 
persons should keep in view the important duty of pulling out the thorns from 
the feet of those who are less fortunate. They may thus not only lay up 
treasures for themselves, but help strew the pathway of some less fortunate 
mortals with roses. After a short time this important duty will become a 
pleasure and then the whole world, in all its harshness and with all its thorns, 
will begin to blossom in real earnest. Charles K. Salisbury, well known real 
estate, loan and insurance dealer of Mt. Vernon and one of the progressive 
and public-spirited citizens of Knox county, is one who believes in the motto, 
"Live and let live." He does not care to rise if he has to trample over the 
rights of others to do so. He believes in honest emulation and fair competi- 
tion and is willing to march side by side with his fellow creatures and take' 
his chances with the rest, giving them their dues and taking his own. And 
because of these and other commendable attributes he has won and retained 
the unlimited confidence and respect of all with whom he has come into con- 
tact, either in a business or social way. 

Mr. Salisbury was born in Morrow county, Ohio, in 1875. He is the 
son of Judson A. and >rora D. Salisbury, a highly respected family of that 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 677 

county, and successful farmers. The subject spent his early boyhood on the 
home farm, where he assisted with the various chores in the summer and at- 
tended the district schools in the winter, remaining on the farm until he was 
fifteen years of age. Then his father died and the mother and rest of the 
family subsequently moved to Mt. Vernon, Knox county, where they have 
lived since about 1890. 

In 1903 Mr. Salisbury engaged in the real estate, loan and insurance 
business in Mt. Vernon, and this has been his chief line of endeavor ever 
since, having built up a large and ever-growing business. He is well in- 
formed on the values of real estate in Mt. Vernon and Knox coimty and he 
is kept very busy with his various lines of work. 

Mr. Salisbury was married in June, 1899, ^^ Nellie M. Robinson. She 
was bom in Mt. Vernon, where she grew to womanhood and was educated. 
She is the daughter of William S. and Mary E. (Lane) Robinson. Three 
children have been bom to the subject and wife, namely: Mary E., Charles 
W. and Louise D. 

Mr. Salisbury is a member of the Baptist church and his wife belongs 
to the Methodist Episcopal church. Politically, he is a Republican and takes 
an active part in public affairs, lending his support to all measures looking to 
the good of the community whose interests he has at heart. He is a member 
of the Mt. Vernon city council. 



LEWIS B. HOUCK. 



Whether the elements of success in life are innate attributes of the 
individual or whether they are quickened by a process of circumstantial 
development, it is impossible to clearly determine. Yet the study of a success- 
ful life, whatever the field of endeaver, is none the less interesting and 
profitable by reason of existence of this same uncertainty. One of the well 
known citizens of Mt. Vernon, Knox county, who deserves distinctive 
prestige among the enterprising men of affairs is Lewis B. Houck. He has 
earned the right to be called one of the progressive men of this locality, 
having fought his way onward and upwards to a prominent position in the 
circles in which he has chosen to move, and in every relation of life his 
voice and influence are on the side of right as he sees and understands the 
right. 

Mr. Houck was bom on April. 19, 1867, in Bladensburg, Knox county. 



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678 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Ohio. He is the son of Washington and Avaline (Bebout) Houck. Grand- 
father William Houck was a resident of Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
and was a Revolutionary soldier. His son, Washington Houck, father of 
the subject of this sketch, was born in that county and in 1822 he came with 
the early settlers to Knox county, Ohio, locating in Jackson township, having 
made the entire journey from his old home in the Keystone state on foot. 
Here he became very well established, and later laid out the town of Bladens- 
burg on his farm and built the first home there. In connection with general 
farming Mr. Houck conducted a general store in Bladensburg for a number 
of years, being regarded as an enterprising and public-spirited citizen of 
that community, filling many offices of trust and responsibility there. In 
1822 he organized a Disciples church in his own home in Bladensburg, which 
was the first Disciples congregation in Ohio, and he was later made an elder 
in that church. His uncle, Jacob Houck, laid out the town of Centerburg, 
Knox county, in 181 7, and thus the family was active and prominent in the 
progress and development of this locality. Mrs. Houck's parents, Lewis and 
Elizabeth Bebout, came from Greene county, Pennsylvania, to Clay township, 
Knox county, in 1826. 

Lewis B. Houck, of this review, spent his childhood and youth in his 
native village of Bladensburg, and there attended the public schools, later 
entering the nomal school at Martinsburg, then Oberlin CoHege, at Oberlin, 
Ohio. With this broad and liberal foundation, he took up the study of law 
in the office of H. D. Critchfield at Mt. Vernon, who afterwards became 
general counsel for the United States Telephone Company at Cleveland. 
In 1892 Mr. Houck was admitted to the bar and immediately opened offices in 
Mt. Vernon. Well grounded in the principles of jurisprudence and with an 
industry which knew no bounds, he immediately began to acquire a good 
practice, his clientage soon embracing those whose business was of most 
important character and his practice extending to all the courts of the district 
and state. A safe counselor and an able advocate, he has won many notable 
cases, has kept fully abreast of the times .in all matters pertaining to his 
profession and won a place in the front rank of the legal lights of this section 
of the state, being an earnest, painstaking, far-seeing and cautious lawyer 
who always has the interests of his clients at heart and spares no pains in 
furthering their interests. 

Before Mr. Houck began his career as an attorney he engaged success- 
fully in teaching in the district schools of the county for a period of eight 
years, and for nine years, from 1888 to 1897, he was a member of the 
county board of school examiners for Knox county, this being a longer time 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 679 

than that of any other official in the same office. In 1898 he was elected to 
the Mt. Vernon city council and was re-elected in 1890 and 1892. He has 
always been active in the Democratic party, making his influence felt in local 
and state politics. He served on the county central committee and as chair- 
man of the executive committee of the county and for years he has rendered 
efficient service to the Democratic cause. He was elected to the Ohio State 
Senate in 1903 and while a member of that distinguished body he made his 
influence felt for the good of his native community and the state in general. 
He served on many important committees, including the judiciary, taxation, 
labor, fees and salaries and various others, eleven in all. It was during his 
term that the Ohio state sanatorium for tuberculosis patients was authorized 
and its location secured for Knox county. In the state campaign of 1905 
he was nominated by his party as its candidate for lieutenant-governor, and 
while John M. Patterson, the candidate for governor, was able to overcome the 
great Republican majority, the remainder of the Democratic state ticket was 
defeated. When Governor Patterson was inaugurated he selected Mr. Houck 
as his private secretary, which responsible and difficult position he filled with 
such ability and fidelity that it brought much credit to himself and the hearty 
commendation of the governor, continuing his duties in this capacity until 
after the death of his chief, who was succeeded by Lieutenant-Governor 
Andrew L. Harris, a Republican, and Mr. Houck retired. 

In fraternal circles Mr. Houck is a member of the various Masonic 
bodies and he is past chancellor of Timon Lodge No. 45, Knights of Pythias; 
past grand of Quindaro Lodge No. 316, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; 
and he is regent of Mt. Vernon Council No. 11, Royal Arcanum. He 
served as grand master of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows in 1908 
and 1909, and has been representative to the grand lodge of both the Odd 
Fellows and Royal Arcanum. He is also a member of the Improved Order 
of Red Men. He has long been prominent in fraternal circles of this section 
of the state. 

Few men are more generally known throughout the state than Mr. Houck 
through his fraternal and political acquaintances, and he has won the con- 
fidence and esteem of all who know him. 

In religion Mr. Houck's views are in harmony with the doctrines and 
teachings of the Disciples church, in which he was reared. 

Mr. Houck was married on December 12, 1894, to Aria B. NichoHs. 

the refined and talented daughter of Daniel and Caroline (McCamment) 

Xicholls. Grandfather Thomas Xicholls was a soldier in the war of 1812 

and he came from Brooke countv, Virginia, to Knox countv. Ohio, in the 

(44) 



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68o KNOX COrNTY, OHIO. 

very early history of this county, alx)ut 1810. The maternal grandfather, 
John S. McCamment, was also a pioneer here, having come from Greene 
county, Pennsylvania, in the early years of the last century and here both 
families became well established and known. The elder McCamment took 
considerable interest in public affairs and served as county commissioner 
in the early days and for three terms as infirmary director. For thirt}' 
years he was a justice of the peace in Jackson township and won high regard 
for his equity and justice. 

One son has been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Houck, Lewis Daniel, now 
thirteen years of age and a pupil of the Mt. Vernon high school, where he 
is making a splendid record. 

Mr. Houck has won an enviable place among men, a leader in his pro- 
fession and in the political party to which he has ever been loyal, also in 
fraternal and social circles. He has little time for leisure, always being busy 
with some important matter. He has been faithful to every trust reposed 
in him, is systematic in his work, painstaking and untiring, accomplishing 
what would astonish many men. He is pronounced in his views, always 
having the courage of his convictions, but is fair and considerate to his 
opponents. His pleasant, hospitable home is one of the most imposing in 
the city, located at No. 107 North Main street, and here the many friends of 
the family frequently gather, never failing to find here good cheer and old- 
time friendliness. 



DR. CHARLES KIXSEY COXARD. 

Doctor Conard was lx)rn on April 19, 1865, at Utica, Licking county, 
Ohio, and is the son of Cyrus M. and Sarah (Kinsey) Conard. The family 
name is of German origin and was originally spelled Conrad. Early in the 
sixteenth centur)\ the traditional three brothers of this name emigrated from 
Holland and located in Germantown, Pennsylvania, where one of the number. 
Cyrus M. Conard's great-grandfather, was killed by Indians. Nathan Con- 
ard, grandfather of Doctor Conard, came from Virginia to Ohio in 1808. 
He made a business of dressing mill-stones. On one of his mill-stone expedi- 
tions to Mt. Vernon, he saw his first saw-mill, which had just started and 
he carried home a sawed board on horse-back, a distance of thirteen miles, 
as a curiosity. He located near Utica, where he established a home, became 
prominent among the pioneers, and was the owned of a large tract of valuable 
land and he gave farms to all of his children. One of his grandchildren 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 68l 

has the original farm that has been in the Conard family over a hundred 
years. 

The mother of Cyrus Conard was a Butcher and her people came from 
England. The Kinsey family settled in the eastern part of Knox county 
at what was called Rochester, below Millwood. The ancestors of the subject 
figured prominently in the early history of the county, and from the pioneer 
epoch to the present the name has been an honored and well known one. The 
Doctor grew to maturity on the home farm where he assisted with the general 
duties about the place during the crop seasons and attended the public schools 
at Utica, and then, turning his attention to the art of healing, he began 
studying medicine under Dr. M. F. Cole. He then attended the Cleveland 
Homeopathic Medical College at Cleveland, Ohio where he made a splendid 
record and from which he was graduated in 1890. He came at once to Mt. 
Vernon, where he has been successfully engaged in the practice, enjoying 
a wide and ever-increasing patronage. Always a student, he has kept well 
abreast of the times and has been very successful. Since locating here he 
took post-graduate courses at the New York Post-Graduate Medical School 
and also at the New York Polyclinic School. 

Doctor Conard married Eva B. Jackson, daughter of Isaac L. Jackson, 
a well known citizen living northwest of Mt. Vernon, their wedding occurring 
on June 27, 1889, and this union has resulted in the birth of two children, 
Carroll D. and Cora Marie. The son, now twenty years old, is attending 
the medical college at Cleveland from which his father was graduated; the 
daughter is a student in Mt. Vernon. 

Fraternally, the Doctor is a member of the Knights of Pythias and Ben 
Hur, and he and his family belong to the Methodist Episcopal church. He 
is medical examiner for several insurance companies and fraternal organiza- 
tions. The family lives in a picturesque and historic old building which 
was used for the Mt. Vernon postoffice in 1835. 



ELLSWORTH VV. BREECE. 

So much in excess of those of success are the records of failures or 
semi-failures, that one is constrained to attempt an analysis in either case 
and to determine the measure of causation in an approximate way. But in 
studying the life record of Ellsworth W. Breece, well known business man 
and public spirited citizen of Mt. Vernon, Knox county, we find many quali- 



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682 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

ties in his makeup that always gain definite success in any career if properly 
directed, as his has evidently been done, which has resulted in a life of good 
to others as well as in a comfortable competence to himself. 

Mr. Breece was born in Fredericktown, Knox county, Ohio, on January 
II, 1867. He is the son of Edson J. and Ruth (Snow) Breece, the father 
born in Knox county and the mother in Lake county, Ohio. The father of 
the subject was a painter and paper-hanger and he spent all of his active life 
in Fredericktown, spending the last few years of his life in Mt. Vernon, 
his death occurring there on September 15, 1907. His widow died April 2, 
1910. 

Ellsworth W. Breece spent his childhood and youth in Fredericktown 
and was educated in the public schools there, graduating from the high 
school in 1885. After leaving school he worked with his father at the 
painting and decorating business, and on January i, 1889, he secured employ- 
ment with the Bell Telephone Company as inspector, his first work being 
done in Mt. Vernon. Five months later he went to Mansfield, thence, a 
month later, to Lancaster as manager for this company. We find him nine 
months later at Newark as manager of the same company and there he 
remained four years. In 1894 he was appointed superintendent of 
cable construction for the Bell Telephone Company for the states of Ohio 
Indiana and Illinois, which position he held with his usual success for three 
years, all the while perfecting himself in every detail of the business. He 
then gave up his position with the Bell people and returned to Fredericktown 
and followed his trade as painter and decorator. On Septeml:)er 15, 1898. 
he engaged with the Mt. Vernon Telephone Company as an inspector. He 
has filled every position up to that of superintendent, to which he was 
appointed in October, 1900, the duties of which he has discharged in such an 
able, conscientious and faithful manner as to reflect much credit upon him- 
self and to the entire satisfaction of officials, stockholders and directors as 
well as the public, proving by his high grade service that he not only under- 
stands every phase of the business, but also that he desires to so direct its 
aflfairs that the system will be of the greatest power in the upbuilding of the 
community. 

The Mt. Vernon Telephone Company commenced business on July i, 
1895, and it has since had a steady growth. When Mr. Breece became super- 
intendent the firm had only three hundred and forty subscribers. They had 
the Mt. Vernon exchange and one at Fredericktown with eighteen telephones. 
Under Mr. Breece's management the business of the company has grown to 
forty-five hundred telephones with eight exchanges, with long distance con- 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 683 

nections to all points north, south, east and west. In 1907 the company 
erected the splendid three-story brick building for the accommodation of 
business and exchange in Mt. Vernon, the entire building being occupied 
by the company's offices, exchanges, supplies, and in the rear of the building 
are the stables for the horses and wagons of the company. Every modem 
appliance and equipment for the highest possible efficiency has been installed. 
The record of calls shows that a service of an average of three seconds has 
l)een made, Jhis probably not being surpassed by any exchange in the state. 
To Mr. Breece more than to anyone else is due this remarkable development 
of the company and its splendid service. The people at Mt. Vernon and 
Knox county heartily indorse Mr. Breece and his telephone company. The 
subject does not give his entire attention to this business now that it has 
been firmly established and in good shape. He is heavily interested in the 
R. G. Brock & Company's meat market at No. 18 North Main street. He 
has been interested in the oil and gas development in Knox county, being one 
of the promotors and stockholders of the Ankenytown Oil and Gas Company. 
He has met with large success in a financial way, due to his individual efforts. 

Mr. Breece was married on January 30, 1887, to Esta M. Phillips, 
daughter of Jacob and Mariah (Painter) Phillips, a highly esteemed family 
of Utica, Licking county, Ohio. This union has resulted in the birth of three 
sons and three daughters, namely: Dema married Ralph G. Brock, who is 
in the meat business with Mr. Breece; Edson lives in Mt. Vernon; John, 
Robert and Marie are all attending school ; Helen is the youngest child. 

Fraternally, Mr. Breece is a member of the Knights of Pythias, the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the National Union, and Henr\' Ban- 
ning Camp, Sons of Veterans, he being eligible for membership in the latter 
by virtue of the fact that his father, Edgar J. Breece, was a soldier in the 
Federal army during the Civil war, having enlisted in Company H, One 
Hundred and Forty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in which he served 
with much credit until the close of the war, in the Army of the Potomac, 
participating in many of the greatest battles of the war. The subject regards 
his membership in the Sons of Veterans as a high privilege and is much inter- 
ested and active in the work of the local camp, being past commander of 
the same. Politically, he is a Republican, having long taken much interest 
in party matters. He has served both as secretary and treasurer of the 
Republican county executive committee and as a frequent delegate to county, 
district and state conventions, in all of which he has made his influence felt 
for the good of his community and the party. He affiliates with the Metho- 
dist church, of which his wife is a member. He has a pleasant, modern 



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684 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

and attractive home at No. 122 North McKenzie street. Personally, he 
is a pleasant, genial and obliging gentleman whom everybody likes and whom 
it is a pleasure to know. 



WILLIAM LANE ROBINSON. 

While yet a young man, William Lane Robinson, of Mt. Vernon, has 
achieved a splendid record at the Knox county bar, having brought the 
qualifications and forces of a drilled, disciplined and well-nigh brilliant intel- 
lect, to the active practice of the law, when he entered upon its complex duties 
and responsibilities. He has not entered the ranks unarmed or ill equipped, 
to be worsted in an unequal contest with the grim old veterans of the local 
bar. His force and effectiveness is strongly emphasized in his preparation 
of cases and in his arguments to the jury, quickly grasping their minds by 
the compass of his own. The calm and masterly manner in w^hich he dis- 
posed of the preliminary considerations is a reminder of the experienced gen- 
eral, quietly arranging his forces and preparing to press down in overwhelming 
force upon a weak point. His manner becomes aroused, his action animated. 
In the careful work of preparation, the minute construction of sentences 
and marshaling of arguments, he is not surpassed by any of the younger 
attorneys of this section of the Buckeye commonwealth. 

Mr. Robinson was born in Mt. Vernon, this county, on April 15, 1880, 
the son of William S. and Mary E. (Lane) Robinson, the father lx)rn in 
Messingham, Lincolnshire, England, and the mother in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, 
this family being an old and honored one here. Oren Lane, his great-grand- 
father, came to this county from Noble county in 1826 and became prominent 
among the pioneers : he originally came from Connecticut. He established a 
good home a short distant west of the present town of Gambier, and devoted 
much of his life to school teaching. During vacations he assisted in build- 
ing old Kenyon College, and threw out the first shovelful of dirt there. He 
was a personal friend of Bishop Chase, who was instrumental in inducing 
him to come to this county. The early records of the Lane family show that 
three brothers emigrated to America from England in 1630, and ever since 
they have been leaders in whatever community they have located. Oren Lane, 
mentioned above, was a soldier in the war of 18 12. He is buried in the 
college cemetery back of Ross hall at Kenyon College. His son, James A. 
I^ne, was a soldier in the Civil war. He was a brick and stone mason and 
built several of the large smokestacks for the big manufacturing concerns 
of Mt. Vernon. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 685 

In 1884 the parents of Willam L. Robinson took him to California, 
where they lived until 1887, then moved back to Mt. Vernon, and here the 
boy grew up and attended the public schools, graduating from the high school 
in 1898. The next four years he attended the Ohio Wesleyan University 
at Delaware, Ohio, where he made an excellent record and from which 
institution he was graduated in 1902. Soon afterwards he earnestly took 
up the study of law in the office of Cooper & Moore, of Mt. Vernon. In 
1903 he entered the law department of Harvard University and was graduated 
with a very creditable record in 1906. Following his graduation, he was 
admitted to the bar in Ohio, then spent a few months in the office of Waight 
& Moore. In April, 1907, he opened an office and began the practice of his 
profession in Mt. Vernon and has remained here to the present time, building 
up a very satisfactory and ever-growing clientage. 

Mr. Robinson was married on September 12, 1910, to Lora A. Howe, 
daughter of William and Harriet A. (Lester) Howe. She was born and 
reared at Tuscola, Illinois, her grandparents having been the first settlers 
in Douglas county. 

Mr. Robinson is a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity, also the 
Phi Beta Kappa society. He belongs to the Methodist Espicopal church, 
while his wife is affiliated with the Presbyterian. Politically he is a stanch 
Republican. He is a well educated, cultured and refined gentleman, and the 
future no doubt holds much in store for him. 



SCOTT D. KERR. 



There is a great deal in being born under a good eye — one that watches 
and guards oflf the error and folly that overtake so many young men. The 
father and the mother who are able to infuse into their children the spirit 
of the Spartans — the spirit that can meet any fate and make the most of the 
world — will see their children grow to years of maturity with excellent 
habits and splendid principles and see them become exemplary- citizens. 
Scott D. Kerr, one of Jackson township's able tillers of the soil, was 
fortunate in having an excellent father and mother, honest, high-minded 
and solicitous of the welfare of their family and kind to their neighbors, 
and the result of their pains in rearing their children is seen today in the 
wholesome lives of their offspring, thus bearing out the admonition of Holy 
Writ, **Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will 
not depart from it." 



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686 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Mr. Kerr was born about one-half mile from his present home in Jack- 
son township, Knox county, on May 27, i860. He is the son of Isaac and 
Elizabeth (Holmes) Kerr, and the grandson of Joseph and Elizabeth Kerr, 
natives of Pennsylvania, who came to Knox county very early and settled 
in Jackson township where they developed a good farm and spent the 
balance of their lives, Mr. Kerr having entered land from the government 
when the country was new and neighbors were the exception rather than 
the rule. The subject's maternal grandparents, Charles and Sarah (Swahlen) 
Holmes, were also natives of Pennsylvania, and early settlers of Coshocton 
county, Ohio, where they spent the rest of their lives. 

The father of the subject was born in Knox county and the mother 
first saw the light of day near Spring Mountain, Coshocton county. They 
were married here and spent their active lives on a farm, Mr. Kerr finally 
becoming the owner of two hundred and fifty acres, and one of the progres- 
sive agriculturists of his community. He lived a quiet and retired life, 
devoting his attention to his farm and family. He met with misfortune by 
losing an eye, which was struck by a flying chip, and nearly went blind as a 
result of it. He was always highly esteemed by those who knew him well, 
for he was a man of fine character. His death occurred on June 16, 1869. 

Nine children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Kerr, four of whom are 
still living, four having died in infancy, and a daughter died on February 25, 
1909. 

Scott D. Kerr was reared on his father's farm and there assisted with 
the general work in his boyhood. He was educated in the Front Royal 
school house. He began farming for himself by renting the home place 
for five years, then bought thirty-three and one-third acres, in addition to 
his own share, later adding thirty-nine acres, then bought seventy-five acres, 
his mother's interest (the mother having died on January 10, 1894), and he 
is now the owner of about one hundred and eighty-three acres of excellent 
land in Jackson township, which he has kept well cultivated and well 
improved, and where he carries on general farming and stock raising success- 
fully, making a specialty of short horn cattle. Merino sheep and Poland- 
China hogs. He has a splendid set of buildings on his place and, in fact, 
ever^'thing is in shipshape, showing that a gentleman of industry and good 
taste as well has its management in hand. 

Politically, Mr. Kerr is a Democrat, and he takes much interest in public 
afi^airs. He and his wife are members of the Dennis church. 

Mr. Kerr was married in January, 1883, to Alpha Hall, a native of Knox 
county and the daughter of Jehu and Phoebe Hall, both bom in this county, 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 687 

also, and the paternal grandparents, Elijah and Matilda Hall, were also old 
settlers here. The maternal grandparents, Abijah and Eliza McLean, were 
natives of Greene county, Pennsylvania, spending their childhood in the vicin- 
ity of Rice's Landing. Both families moved here in early days and here the 
parents of Mrs. Kerr became very comfortably established. The father was 
a tailor, and his death occurred on July 24, 1865 : the mother died on August 
16, 1896. 

One daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. Kerr, namely: Ada Lee, who 
married M. N. Ross, on December 2^, 1905; they live in Jackson township, 
Knox county, and are the parents of two daughters, Pauline Elizabeth and 
Helen Thelma. 



WILLLAM F. SEMPLE, D. D. S. 

Concentration of purpose and persistently applied energy rarely fail 
of success in the accomplishment of any task, however great, and in tracing 
the career of Dr. William F. Semple, a well-known dentist of Mt. Vernon, 
Knox county, it is plainly seen that these things have been the secret of his 
rise to a prominent position in the professional world and in winning the 
confidence and esteem of a wide circle of friends and acquaintances. More- 
over, he possesses genuine love for his work and regards it as a privilege 
to carry comfort and aid to the suffering. 

Doctor Semple was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, in the 
town of Canonsburg. He is the son of Alexander W. and Mary (Finley) 
Semple. These parents moved to Steubenville, Ohio, when their son, Will- 
iam F., was only a child, and there the father practiced his profession of 
dentistry and there he and his wife spent the rest of their lives. 

Doctor Semple was educated in the public schools of Steubenville and 
Grove Academy, of Steubenville, under Dr. John W. Scott. After leaving 
the academy he began the study of dentistry in his father's office and he 
remained with his father until 1858. At that time there were no dental 
colleges, but in 1868 he appeared before the Ohio state board of dental 
examiners, stood a satisfactory examination, and has a diploma that he is 
very proud of. In 1858 he came to Fredericktown, Knox county, and opened 
an office there. In 1867 he came to Mt. Vernon and opened an office and 
here he has been continuously engaged in practice to the present day, enjoying 
a liberal patronage from all over this locality. In point of years of practice 
he is now the oldest practicing dentist in Mt. Vernon and has been one of the 



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688 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

most successful, keeping fully abreast of advancing methods and ever remain- 
ing a close student of all that pertains to his profession, known all over Knox 
county as a skilled practitioner and he has always enjoyed a wide clientage. 
He has a w-ell arranged office equipped with the most modern and best im- 
proved instruments and appliances known to the profession. His office is 
located at Vine and South Main streets. 

Doctor Semple was married m September, 1859, to Abbie Young, 
daughter of Nathaniel M. and Belinda (Shurr) Young, a well known family 
of Fredericktown, Knox county, and to this union three children have been 
born, one of whom died in infancy; Jennie married William C. McFadden, 
of Fargo, North Dakota, where he is president of the Commercial Bank; 
Carl Y.. who lives in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is president of the Citizens 
State Bank at Coalgate, that state, and he is engaged in business in Oklahoma 
City. 

Politically, Doctor Semple is a Republican and while always interested 
in public matters, he has never Ijeen an office seeker. He has been a member 
of the Masonic order for more than fifty years. He and his wife belong 
to St. Paul's Episcopal church and have always been active in church work. 
Personally, he is a polished, genial, broad-minded and companionable gentle- 
man. 

In 1905 Doctor Semple formed a partnership with Albert \V. Crumley 
for the practice of dentistr\'. A sketch of Dr. Crumley appears on another 
page of this work. 



ALBERT W. CRUMLEY, D. D. S. 

One of the skilled and popular practitioners of dental surgery in Mt 
Vernon, Knox county, is Dr. All^ert \V. Crumley, in partnership with Dr. 
William F. Semple, whose record is elsewhere set forth in this history. The 
former is a man of such industry, adroitness and integrity as to render him 
popular with the masses and with the esteem and confidence of all concerned. 
He has succeeded despite the obstacles encountered on life's rough highway, 
and has never permitted adverse circumstances in any relation of life to 
dampen his ardor in material things or turn him into a misanthrope or cynic. 

Doctor Crumley was Ix^rn on May 3, 1858, near Cooperdale, Coshocton 
county, Ohio, and is the son of Samuel and Catherine (Stevens) Crumley, 
The father was a carpenter by trade and was known as a very skilled work- 
man. In 1874 the family moved to Mt. Vernon where the father has since 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 689 

been engaged as a carpenter and a contractor, having been fairly successful 
in a business way, and here he and his wife still reside. 

Doctor Crumley was educated in the district schools of Coshocton 
county, and when the family moved to Mt. Vernon, he entered the office of 
his uncle. Dr. Robert Stevens, for the purpose of studying dentistry and he 
remained with his uncle until Doctor Stevens left Mt. Vernon for Lima, 
Ohio. The subject was then, in 1880, employed in the office of Dr. William 
F. Semple, mentioned above, remaining in the capacity of assistant until 
1895, ^vhen these two gentlemen formed a partnership, which has continued 
most successfully to the present time, this firm becoming one of the best 
known and most successful in this section of the country. The subject has 
kept thoroughly abreast of the best methods and appliances known to the 
profession. 

Doctor Crumley was married on May 3, 1893, to Lillian Scott, daugh- 
ter of J. Foster and Frances (Elliott) Scott, a highly respected family. To 
the Doctor and wife one daughter, Ellen K., has been born. 

Doctor Crumley in his fraternal relations is a member of Mt. Vernon 
Lodge No. 140, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and religiously 
he affiliates with the Presbyterian church, of which his wife and daughter 
are members. He is a Republican in politics, but has never taken an active 
interest in public affairs. He is a very pleasant gentleman to meet and his 
reputation for honesty has remained unassailed. 



CASSIUS B. MOREE. 

Berlin township, Knox county, can claim many progressive agriculturists, 
but it is doubtful if Cassius B. Moree is surpassed by any of them, as only a 
cursory glance at his well tilled, well improved farmstead will show, for he 
has always believed it wise to do thoroughly whatever was worth attempting 
at all. and he was never known to go at his tasks half-heartedly, neither has 
he depended upon others to either lay his plans or execute them. His life has 
been led along conser\^ative lines and modulated according to the Golden Rule, 
so that he has always had the respect of his fellow men. 

Mr. Moree was born in Richland county, Ohio, Ma\' 31, 1864. He is the 
son of Christopher and Maria (Leedy) Moree. The paternal grandparents, 
Rudolph and Ann (Biederman) Moree, were natives of Switzerland, and in 
1826 the family came to America, and after leaving his family at I^ncaster 



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690 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

the grandfather came on foot to Richland county, Ohio, and there bought one 
hundred and sixty acres, which he cleared and improved, brought his family 
here as soon as he had prepared a shelter for them, and here he spent the 
balance of his life. Upon coming to America he sailed from Havre, France, 
the voyage requiring fifty days in an old-fashioned sailing vessel. The mater- 
nal grandparents, Samuel and Catherine (Lett) Leedy, were natives of 
Pennsylvania and Maryland, respectively, and they came to Ohio and located 
in Richland county, near Ankenytown, and he got land in both counties, 
and there he and his wife spent the balance of their lives. 

The father was born in Switzerland on February 9, 1823, and he came to 
America as a child with his parents and located at Lancaster, Ohio, and later 
moved to Richland county where he was reared and married. The mother 
of the subject was born in Richland county, Ohio, on February 26. 1826, and 
there was reared, educated and married. The father was a cabinetmaker 
and wa» a skilled workman. Later in life he worked at the carpenter's trade 
and in the furniture business and he made coffins. He moved to Knox county 
about 1873 and here spent the rest of his life. Politically, he was a Republi- 
can, but was not an office seeker. He and his wife belonged to the Brethren 
church. 

Nine children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Moree, all living 
at this writing. The father's death occurred on May 9, 1908; the mother 
survives. 

Cassius B. Moree was educated in the public schools and when a boy 
he learned the carpenters trade, which he followed for two years, and he 
was employed as bridge caipenter for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Com- 
pany. In 1873 ^^ ^^^ his father bought twenty-five acres and since then he 
has added to his place until he now has ninety-nine acres in partnership with 
his brother and he has enjoyed a very comfortable income as a general farmer 
and stock raiser. 

Politically, Mr. Moree is a Republican. He belongs to the Progressive 
church, while his wife is a member of the Disciples church. He has been a 
merrrt)er of the Knights of Pythias for about twenty-one years. 

Mr. Moore was married on October 7, 1895, ^^ Verda May Izer, who 
was born May 27, 1871, in Richland county, Ohio. She is the daughter of 
Joseph and Susan Izer. The father was killed by falling oflf a straw-stack, 
and the mother died on January 19, 1906. Mr. Izer was born in Maryland 
and his wife in Pennsylvania. They were married in the latter state. Mr. 
Izer devoted his life to farming and owned ninety acres at the time of his 
death. He came to Ohio about 1866 and settled in Richland county and there 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 69 1 

spent the rest of his life. They were the parents of ten children, seven of 
whom are living. The mother was a member of the Disciples church. 

Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Morse, namely : Mazie May 
died when seven months old; Reta is a student in the home schools; Grace 
died when seven months old ; Glenn is a school boy ; Hobart, Goldie Fay and 
Bessie Alverna. 



FRANK M. COCHRAN. 

There is no positive rule for achieving success, and yet in the life of 
the successful man there are always lessons which might well be followed. The 
man who gains prosperity is he who can see and utilize the opportunities that 
come in his path. Frank M. Cochran, well known business and real estate 
man of Mt. Vernon, Knox county, seems to be one who has had the ability and 
initiative to seize the right opportunity at the right time ^and triumph over 
obstacles where less courageous spirits would have yielded and gone under. 

Mr. Cochran was born December 21, 1856, in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, and he 
has been content to make this his home, believing that no better place could 
be found for the exercise of his talents. He is the son of William and La- 
vila (Young) Cochran, each representing fine old pioneer families. The 
mother was one of a family of eleven daughters and four sons. The father 
was a plasterer by trade, which he plied successfully in Mt. Vernon and sur- 
rounding country for many years, or during his active life, his death occurring 
in 1 899,. his wife having preceded him to the grave about fifteen years. 

Frank M. Cochran attended the public schools of Mt. Vernon when a 
boy, but when only twelve years of age he left school to return no more and 
entered the business world. He began carrying a hod for the plasterers un- 
der his father and later learned the plasterer's trade and when sixteen years 
of age was earning three dollars per day. He followed this trade with un- 
varying success until about 1900. Being skilled in his chosen line of endeavor 
and honest in all his dealings with his fellow men, his services were in great 
demand. He followed the line of contracting plasterer from the time he 
reached his majority until the year last mentioned, when he turned his atten- 
tion to the real estate business. He plastered many of the best business blocks, 
public buildings and private residences in this locality. He has lx)ught and 
sold a great number of fanns and city property since engaging in the real 
estate business, and it is safe to say that no man in this vicinity is l>etter in- 
formed on the value of local real estate. He has a pleasant and substantial 



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- 692 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

home and at Xo. 106 South Main street he has a well arranged and neatly- 
kept office. 

Politically, Mr. Cochran is a Republican and has always been deeply in- 
terested in public afifairs, but has never been an office seeker or holder. He is 
a member of the American Insurance Union. 

Mr. Cochran was married twice, first in 1877 ^^ Alice Church, daughter 
of Ball and Margaret Church of Mt. Vernon, which union resulted in the 
birth of one son, Walter, who makes his home in this city. The wife and 
mother passed to her rest in 1881, and in 1883 ^^' Cochran was married to 
Clara S. Dunlap, daughter of William and Martha Dunlap, of Knox county. 
To this union one daughter, Martha Virginia, was l)orn ; she is now a student 
in the Mt. Vernon schools. 

Mr. Cochran and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
This family is highly respected throughout the city and vicinity. 



PETER J. PARKER. 



There is no positive rule for achieving success, and yet in the life of the 
successful man there are always lessons which might well be followed. The 
man who gains prosperity is he who can see and utilize opportunities that 
come in his path. This seems to have been done by Peter J. Parker, the present 
able and popular sheriff of Knox county, a man who has long figured more 
or less conspicuously in business and public life in Mt. Vernon, and who, for 
many reasons, is eminently entitled to specific mention in the history of his 
section of the Buckeye state, not the least of which is the fact that he is the 
worthy representative of a sterling old pioneer family whose excellent repu- 
tation he has ever sought to keep untarnished. 

Mr. Parker was born May 2, 1867, at Gambier, College township, Knox 
county. He is the son of Peter and Mary (Esterbrook) Parker, both born 
in England, having emigrated to America when young, the mother with her 
parents at the age of eight years, the father being twenty-one years of age 
when he came, unaccompanied. He first permanently settled at Gambier, 
Ohio, was married in that place and spent the remainder of his life there. By 
trade he was a stone mason and stone cutter and contracted stone bridge 
work. He was a man of exemplary character and could claim a very wide 
circle of friends throughout the county. His death occurred in January, 1910; 
his widow still resides in Gambier, where she has a pleasant home. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 693 

The son, Peter J. Parker, spent his childhood and youth at Gambier where 
he attended the public schools. When a young man he learned telegraphy in 
the railroad office at Gambier, and his first employment was in November, 
1888, as agent and operator at Condit, Delaware county, Ohio, for the Cleve- 
land, Akron & Columbus Railroad Company, remaining there until April ii, 
1890, when he went to Warsaw, Coshocton county, as agent and operator, re- 
maining at Warsaw until August, 1892, when he became the agent of the 
Adams Express Company at Mt. Vernon, filling this position with his usual 
pronounced success and general satisfaction until November i, 1895, when 
he went to Brink Haven, Knox county, as agent for the Cleveland, Akron 
& Columbus railroad and remained in Brink Haven until August, 1907, when 
he gave up the railroad position and entered the Brink Haven Banking Com- 
pany as cashier, which he held in a manner that reflected much credit upon 
himself and to the entire satisfaction of the stockholders, other officials and 
all concerned until December i, 1908. Having always been active in political 
aflfairs, he had made the race for sheriflf of Knox county that year and had 
been elected at the polls in November, consequently gave up his position with 
the bank in order to assume his duties as sheriff, which he did in January, 
1909. He handled its affairs with such consummate skill and fairness and 
proved to be such a popular official that his constituents gladly returned him 
to this office in the November election of 1910 and he entered upon his second 
term as sheriff on January 2, 191 1, and is now discharging the duties of the 
same in a manner that has elicited the hearty approval of all concerned, irre- 
spective of party alignment- 

Politically, Mr. Parker is a Democrat and has always been regarded as 
a reliable party man. While a resident at Brink Haven he served as village 
clerk for two years. In w-hatever position as public . servant he has been 
called upon to fill he has been found to be obliging, courteous, capable, ever 
painstaking and alert to serve the people in the best possible manner. 

Mr. Parker was married on September 27, 1900, to Ida McDonnold. the 

accomplished daughter of and Isabelle (Winslow^) McDonnold, a 

highly respected family of Brink Haven. This union has resulted in the 
birth of one son, Thurston Parker. 

Fraternally, Mr. Parker is a member of the Masonic order, the Knights 
of Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. He was reared and baptized an Episcopalian and 
he adheres to that faith, though not a member of the church. Mrs. Parker 
belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church. 



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694 KNOX COUNTY, Orih). 

CHARLES W. HAYES. 

In the daily laborious struggle for an honorable competence and a 
solid career on the part of a business or a professional man there is little 
to attract the casual reader in search of a sensational chapter; but to a mimi 
thoroughly awake to the reality and meaning of human existence there are 
noble and imperishable lessons in the career of an individual who, with 
little other means than a clear head, true heart and a determined will, directed 
and controlled by high ideals, surmounts the common obstacles of life and 
gains the heights of even mediocre success and also the esteem of his fellow 
men. Such a one is found in the person of Charles W. Hayes, one of the best 
known and most successful educators of Knox county, Ohio. He is now 
county clerk. 

Mr. Hayes was bom October 20, 1873, ^^ Morrow county, Ohio, the 
son of Jacob and Matilda (Lauderbaugh) Hayes, both natives of Knox 
county, Ohio, where they grew to maturity, were educated and married. 
After their marriage they moved to Morrow county, later moved to Morgan 
township, Knox county, where they now reside on a farm, being yery com- 
fortably established. They have lived on the farm all their lives. Jacob 
Hayes is a Democrat and has been more or less active in public matters, hav- 
ing filled the office of township trustee, township treasurer, township clerk 
and he was justice of the peace for a period of eighteen years in Morgan 
township, this county, and in Harmony township, Morrow county. In 1870 
he was real estate appraiser in Harmony township. Morrow county, and in 
1880 and 1890 he was real estate appraiser in Morgan township, Knox 
county. He is a man of exemplary character and is thoroughly informed 
upon all public questions, and at the age of eighty-five years he is still hale 
and hearty and active for a man of his years. He is living on the farm en- 
tered from the government by his father, James R. Hayes, who came to 
Knox county with the early pioneers from Greene county, Pennsylvania. 
The farm has remained in the family ever since. His grandfather, the great- 
grandfather of the subject, came from Ireland to America in early colonial 
days and was married in Philadelphia on April 4, 1759, and later moved to 
Greene county, Pennsylvania, where he si>ent the remainder of his life. 
Jacob Hayes is a member of the Universalist church and his wife belongs 
to the Methodist Episcopal church. 

The son, Charles \V. Hayes, spent his childhood and youth until eighteen 
years of age on the home farm, assisting with the general work about the 
place, attending the country district schools. He then entered the Martins- 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 695 

burg high school, from which he was graduated in 1894. Following this 
he attended the Northwestern University at Ada, Ohio, and the Central 
Normal College at Danville, Ohio. While attending the two latter he 
taught school at intervals, and after leaving school he continued to teach 
for twelve years in all, in the district schools of Knox county and the Bran- 
don village schools. Being universally recognized as an able, painstaking, 
up-to-date instructor, his services have been veiy satisfactory and in great 
demand and he ranks as second to none of his contemporary teachers in 
this locality. He has always l)een a close student and in the school room is 
both an instructor and entertainer and is popular with both pupils and 
patrons. 

Politically, Mr. Hayes is a Democrat and a man thoroughly informed 
on public questions. While a resident of Miller township, Knox county, he 
served as township treasurer for two terms. In 1906 he gave up teaching 
and on September 12th of that year he entered the office of the county 
clerk as deputy and in that capacity he made such a favorable impression 
on the public that in the fall of 1 910 he was elected county clerk, both com- 
mon pleas and circuit, and entered upon his duties August 7, 191 1. 

Mr. Hayes was married on August 30, 1900, to Hattie E. Squires, 
daughter of Timothy and Emma (Evans) Squires. Her father is a promi- 
nent farmer of Miller township, this county, where he and his wife are 
highly respected. 

No children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hayes. Fraternally he 
is a member of the Knights of Pythias Lodge No. 555, of Utica, Ohio; 
Mt. Vernon Lodge No. 170, Knights of Maccabees, and Clinton Grange, 
Patrons of Husbandry. He is also a member of the Order of Owls, Mt. 
Vernon Nest. He belongs to the Christian church, w^hile his wife affiliates 
with the Baptists. The family home is in South Vernon. Mr. Hays is 
regarded as a progressive, honest, public-spirited citizen and is regarded as 
one of the best clerks the county has ever had. 



CHARLES L. BERMONT. 

A man who is eminently deserving of a place in this work is Charles 
L. Bermont, the present able and popular clerk of the courts of Knox county, 
partly because he is the representative of an excellent old family, and partly 
because of his pronounced success in life in the face of obstacles and diffi- 

(45) 



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696 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

culties that would have made many another man falter in despair; but with 
rare fortitude and courage he has pressed forward with his face set toward 
the end of the rainbow, i>ermitting nothing to deflect or thwart him in his 
course, which has been such as to gain not only material success, but, what 
is of more importance, the good will and confidence of his fellow men who 
have been pleased to entrust to his guidance the afifairs of important public 
office, and in every instance he has more than met their fullest expectations. 

Mr. Bermont was born December 30, 1877, in Richland county, near 
Lexington, Ohio, and he is the son of Daniel and Retta (Riley) Bermont, 
the father a native of Franklin county, Pennsylvania, and the mother of 
Delaw^are county, Ohio. Daniel Bermont devoted his life to fanning and in 
1890 he moved to Wayne township, Kjnox county. His death occurred on 
March 15, 1905: his widow still survives and makes her home in Frederick- 
town. 

The son, Charles L. Bermont, spent his youth on the farm, assisting 
in the general work and he attended the country district schools, latter grad- 
uating from the high school at Fredericktown in 1897. In March of that 
year he met with a railroad accident at Fredericktown, in which he lost his 
left arm, but after recovering he completed the high school course and was 
graduated with his class. He was a good student and prepared himself 
for teaching, which he followed successfully in the district schools of Knox 
county for seven years, being regarded as a capable and progressive educa- 
tor. The accident by which he lost his arm changed his whole course, 
though it did not daunt him. He had intended devoting his attention to 
agricultural pursuits, being greatly interested in farming and the oppor- 
tunities it offered. 

Mr. Bennont is a Democrat in politics, as was also his father, and he 
has always taken an active part in public matters. In 1899 he was elected 
corporation clerk of Fredericktown, and, although that town is a Republi- 
can stronghold, he was elected mayor there in 1902, and he enjoyed the 
distinction of being the youngest mayor in the state up to that time. He 
served one term and an extension under the law, making three years in all. 
He did much for the permanent good of that town and won the hearty ap- 
proval of all, irrespective of party alignment. In the fall of 1905 he was 
elected clerk of the courts of Knox count>' and he filled this responsible po- 
sition so ably that he was re-elected for a second term in the fall of 1908, 
his term expiring August 7, 1911, serving in that capacity in a manner that 
elicited the hearty approval of all concerned, being regarded as one of the 
best clerks the county ever had, being not only a competent, but courteous 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 697 

and obliging^ public servant. For a number of years he has been a law stu- 
dent in the office of L. C. Stilwell, ex-prosecuting attorney of Knox county, 
and it is his intention to be admitted to the bar, whereupon he will enter 
the active practice in Mt. Vernon. Eminent success no doubt awaits him in 
this field. 

Mr. Bermont was married on October 25, 1905, to Zada M. Studor, 
daughter of J. B. and Ada (Rinehart) Studor, of Fredericktown, Ohio. 
Both parents are still living and are highly respected in their neighborhood. 
One daughter, Sarah, now four years old, has been bom to Mr. and Mrs. 
Bermont. Religiously, Mr. Bermont belongs to the Methodist Episcopal 
church, while his wife is a member of the Baptist church. They have a 
pleasant home at No. 507 North Main street. 

Mr. Bermont is a splendid and popular young man, courteous and 
obliging; being widely and favorably known throughout Knox county, he 
is held in high esteem. 



ALFRED R. McINTIRE. 

Rising above the heads of the masses are many men of sterling worth 
and value, who, by sheer perseverance and pluck, have conquered fortune 
and by their own unaided eflforts have risen from the ranks of the common- 
place to positions of eminence in the professional world, and at the same 
time have commanded the trust and respect of those with whom they have 
been thrown in contact. Among the earnest men of a past generation in 
Knox county whose depth of character and strict adherence to principle 
excited the admiration of their contemporaries was the late Alfred R. Mc- 
Intire, of Mt. Vernon. He was widely recognized as one of the leading 
lawyers and public men of this locality and in his death the community 
suflFered a distinct loss. 

Mr. Mclntire was bom in Holmes county, Ohio, on July 14, 1840, 
the son of John Mclntire and wife, who came to Knox county, Ohio, when 
their son, Alfred R., of this review, was twelve years of age, and here they 
became well established on a farm and the elder Mclntire was prominent in 
the early affairs of the county, having been justice of the peace for many 
years. His son, Alfred R., was reared to manhood on the home farm, which 
he worked during the summer months when he became of proper age. He 
received a limited schooling in the old-time log cabin school houses in his 
district, but he was a diligent student and he prepared himself for a teacher. 



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698 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

which profession he followed in diflferent districts of the county for some 
time. Later he attended Ohio Wesleyan University at Delaware, Ohio, and 
was a student there when the Civil war broke out, and he threw down his 
text-books and enlisted in defense of the national union as a member of the 
Ninety-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry and he saw considerable hard service, 
including the siege of Vicksburg. While his regiment was encamped in the 
swamps of that vicinity he fell seriously ill and was discharged for physical 
disability and returned home. After recovering he re-enlisted and again 
entered the army as first lieutenant of Company B, One Hundred and Forty- 
second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and he served until the close of the war, 
being advanced to the rank of captain for meritorious service and he led 
his company in a gallant manner, winning the hearty approval of his su- 
perior oflficers. After the war he returned to the Ohio Wesleyan University 
and finished his course, graduating in 1866. Ex-Senator Foraker was a 
student at the university at the same time and the two were members of the 
same college fraternity, the Phi Kappa Psi. After leaving college he was 
superintendent of the public schools at Fredericktown for two years and at 
the same time he was reading law, and in the fall of 1869 he took the law 
examination and was admitted to the bar. He began practice in Mt. Vernon, 
where he was an honored member of the profession until his death, in 
September, 1903. He was, for a time, a partner of Hon. Rollin C. Hurd, 
which partnership continued until the death of Mr. Hurd in 1874. He 
then became a partner of Desault B. Kirk, which partnership was terminated 
in 1882, when Mr. Kirk gave up active practice and became associated with 
the Cooper Foundry and Machine Company. Mr. Mclntire then practiced 
alone until 1901, when his son Rollin R. (mentioned in a separate sketch 
in this work) l)ecame associated with him, under the firm name of Mclntire 
& Mclntire. He easily ranked among the leading lawyers of his day and 
generation in this section of the Buckeye state. 

Mr. Mclntire was decidedly a man of afifairs. He was active in the 
organization of the original Mt. Vernon Bridge Company and was the first 
vice-president of the same. He was also greatly interested in the Ohio 
Archeological Society and gave the work and efforts of the society much 
time and helpful attenhon. He was a Republican in politics until the last 
years of his life. He was active in party and public affairs and was one 
of the prominent public men of the state. He was a candidate for state 
senator several times in a strong Democratic district, and was, of course, 
defeated. In 1898 and 1900 he was the candidate for supreme judge on 
the Union Reform ticket. He was a man of strong convictions and stead- 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO 699 

fast purpose, honest and popular with the masses. Fraternally, he was a 
member of the Knights of Pythias, and he was a regular attendant of the 
Presbyterian church, of w^hich his wife and family were members. He had 
been reared in the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Mclntire was married on October 25, 1869, to Helen Richards, 
daughter of Daniel and Clarissa Richards, an excellent old pioneer family. 
She was born in Fredericktown, Ohio, and her death occurred on February 
14, 1910, having survived her husband eight years. Two children were 
born to this union, Rollin R., mentioned above, and Alfred Heber, editor 
and manager of the Electric Journal, oi Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 



WILLIAM A. HOSACK. 

The career of William A. Hosack at the Knox county bar has been 
emphasized by persistent industry, strict attention to business, unswerving 
integrity, the closest application and study, and a degree of care, prudence 
and promptitude in the disposition of responsibilities intrusted to him, 
worthy of imitation. Punctuality he observes as a professional maxim. 
With him appointments once made become debts. He always aims to do 
things at the right time; and thus, it is punctuality by which men testify 
their personal respect for those whom they are called upon to meet in 
affairs of business. 

Mr. Hosack was born April 30, 1874, in Fredericktown, Knox county, 
Ohio, the son of Cyrus and Honor Abiah (Foote) Hosack, both natives 
of this county, and they spent their entire lives in Fredericktown and vi- 
cinity. The father was a prominent physician and was also actively identi- 
fied with various industries and business enterprises of Fredericktown. He 
was distinctively a man of affairs and took a conspicuous part in all enter- 
prises and movements that had in view the advancement of the community. 
He was always regarded as a man of unshrinking integrity, strict honesty, 
technical in his definitions of morality and unbending in his fidelity to them. 
His life was a busy and useful one. His death occurred in 1889 and he 
was preceded to the grave by his wife in 1880. They are buried in the 
cemetery at Fredericktown. 

The son, William A. Hosack, spent his childhood and youth in Fred- 
ericktown and he attended the public schools there, and later he studied two 
years at the University of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio, being a member of the 



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700 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

class of 1897, after which he entered Adelbert College at Cleveland. In 
May, 1897, he began the study of law in the offices of Col. W. C. Cooper, 
of Mt. Vernon, and he was admitted to the bar on examination in December, 
1900. Early in 1901 he opened an office in the McDermot building, Mt. 
Vernon, for the practice of his profession and he has been successfully en- 
gaged in the same here ever since, enjoying a large and ever growing cli- 
entele and figuring very conspicuously in all the local courts. He practices 
in all the courts of the state and in the United States district courts. He 
is known to be an industrious, painstaking, studious attorney, ever vigilant 
of the interests of his clients. He not only has the reputation of doing 
things, but of doing them well. In June, 1908, he moved his office from the 
McDermot building to the First National Bank building, where he is now 
located, having a neat suite of offices, well supplied with up-to-date law 
books. 

Politically, Mr. Hosack is a Republican and he maintains a keen in- 
terest in public affairs, being well informed on all issues, and in discussions 
is well able to defend and maintain his position. He very acceptably filled 
the office of city clerk during 1900 and 1902. 

Mr. Hosack was one of the promoters of the Citizens Building and 
Loan Association and he has been its secretary since its organization in 1907. 
It is regarded as one of the solid and successful financial institutions of Mt. 
Vernon. 

On August 21, 1902, Mr. Hosack was united in marriage with X. 
Lucile Parrott, the accomplished daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Benton 
Parrott, a highly respected family of Mt. Vernon, and this union has 
resulted in the birth of three children, Elizabeth, Cyrus and Margerite. The 
family home, at Xo. 800 East Gambier street, is a pleasant one, in a de- 
lightful suburban section of the city. 



JAMES L. LEONARD. 

In the respect that is accorded to men who have fought their own 
way to success through unfavorable environment we find an unconscious 
recognition of the intrinsic worth of a character which can not only en- 
dure so rough a test, but gain new strength through the discipline. The 
gentleman to whom the biographer now calls the reader's attention was 
not favored by inherited wealth or the assistance of influential friends, but 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 7OI 

in spite of this, by perseverance, industry and wise economy, he has at- 
tained a comfortable station in life, making his influence felt for good in 
Knox county, where he has long maintained his home, and because of the 
honorable career he has known here, and also because he has filled worthily 
positions of public trust, he is eminently worthy of a place in this book. 

James L. Leonard, the present able and popular city solicitor of Mt. 
Vernon, was bom October 29, i860, in Columbiana county, Ohio, the son of 
Abner E. and Rebecca (Fitzsimmons) Leonard, both parents natives of Colum- 
biana county, Ohio, later in life moving to Coshocton county, this state, 
locating near Spring Mountain in 1872 and engaged in farming, which he 
made his life work. The family moved from there to Holmes county, Ohio, 
in 1889, where the parents spent the remainder of their lives, the father 
dying in September, 1905, having been preceded to the grave in January of 
that year by his wife. They were highly respected people and industrious 
throughout their lives. 

The son, James L. Leonard, was reared on the fami and he assisted 
with the general work on the home place when a boy and in the winter 
months he attended the common schools, later attended Northwestern Uni- 
versity at Ada, Ohio, where he made a splendid record and from which in- 
stitution he was graduated in 1890, with the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Before entering the university he had begun teaching, and in order to se- 
cure funds to gain a higher education he practiced alternating a year of 
teaching with one in the university. While teaching in Millersburg he be- 
gan reading law in the office of Judge Maxwell & Sharp of that city. The 
year following he entered the law department of the Ohio State University 
at Columbus, from which he was graduated in June, 1893, ^"d the same 
year he opened an office at Mt. Vernon and has been here ever since, having 
enjoyed a large and gradually increasing clientele and taking a high rank 
among the attorneys of the county, figuring conspicuously in the local 
courts for eighteen years. He is regarded as an able, careful, conscientious 
and energetic lawyer who ever has at heart the interests of his clients and 
who has remarkable success in the trial of cases. 

Politically, Mr. Leonard is a Republican and he has ever been loyal 
to the tenets of his party. He was elected justice of the i>eace soon after 
coming to Mt. Vernon and served in this capacity for eleven years in a 
manner that reflected much credit upon himself and to the entire satisfac- 
tion of all concerned. In the fall of 1910 he was elected city solicitor and 
is now serving as such. Fraternally, he belongs to the Masonic order, in 
which he stands high. 



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702 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Mr. Leonard was married on January 27, 1904, to Mrs. Ida Sweet- 
Gilinore, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a lady of many winning traits. This 
union has been without issue. 

Mr. Leonard is a studious man and is well versed, not only on all mat- 
ters of the law, but on public, scientific and literary topics, and he is a gen- 
tleman of high character and stands well in the community. His pleasant 
home is at No. 302 South Gay street. 



ROLLIN R. McINTIRE. 

The well known Mt. Vernon attorney, RoUin R. Mclntire, is regarded 
by all classes as one of Knox county's enterprising, progressive, public- 
spirited citizens, quick to see, to seize, to act and aid in any project that 
means prosperity and growth to his locality and cherishing a deep interest 
in all movements for the general good. Pleasant and impressive in address, 
he is kind, generous, straightforward, genial and companionable. He has 
achieved an honorable record in his profession, and, in fact, in all circles, 
being a worthy son of a worthy sire and esteemed for the many qualities 
that go to make up the inherent and finer qualities of a refined gentleman. 

Mr. Mclntire was bom in Mt. Vernon. Ohio, on March i, 1871, and 
he is the son of Alfred R. and Helen (Richards) Mclntire, the former born 
in Holmes county, this state, and the mother in Knox county. Grandfather 
John Mclntire came to Knox county with his family when the father of the 
subject was twelve years of age and became one of the influential pioneers 
here, engaging in farming on an extensive scale. Grandfather Mclntire 
and grandfather Richards were justices of the peace in adjoining townships 
for several years and both were able dispensers of justice and well known 
and popular in their townships. A complete sketch of Alfred R. Mclntire 
and wife, parents of the subject, is to be found on another page in this 
volume. 

Rollin R. Mclntire was educated in the Mt. Vernon public schools, 
from which he was graduated with the class of 1887. He then attended 
the Ohio State University at Columbus one year ; later entered Oberlin College, 
where he made a splendid record and from which he was graduated in 
1894. Upon leaving college he began traveling for the Mt. Vernon Bridge 
Company and the Groton Iron Works, continuing successfully with them 
for about three years. He also went into the works of the Mt. Vernon 
Bridge Company and was employed as a workman, in order to learn the 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 703 

business thoroughly. But notwithstanding his excellent start in the busi- 
ness world, he took up the study of law in 1898 with his father and was 
admitted to the bar in 1901 and he practiced with his father until the latter's 
death in 1902. He then formed a partnership with D. B. Grubb, which 
continued until Mr. Grubb moved to Columbus in 1906; since then he 
has practiced alone. He makes a specialty of abstract work and has done 
a great deal of abstracting for coal comoanies in southern Ohio and Ken- 
tucky and is widely known as an expert in his line. As an attorney he 
stands high among his contemporaries at the bar. keeping well advised on 
all phases of the profession, being accurate, with an analytical mind, 
well balanced and always actuated with fairness and fidelity to his 
duty. 

Politically, Mr. Mclntire is a Republican and he has long been active 
in public aflfairs. He has served as a member of the council of Mt. Vernon, 
also as city solicitor for four years, and in January, 19 10, he was elected 
city clerk, which office he yet holds, giving his usual high grade and com- 
mendable service. 

Mr. Mclntire was married on December 6, 1898, to Laura L. Stone, 
daughter of Dan C. and Delilah (Martin) Stone, a highly respected family 
of Mt. Vernon, the father being the local representative 6f the Standard Oil 
Company; the mother's death occurred in November, 1903. 

Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Mclntire, both of whom 
are deceased. He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church 
and are both popular with the best society of the city and county. Their 
neatly arranged and tastily kept home is at No. 505 East Vine street. 

Personally, Mr. Mclntire has ever been popular with a wide circle of 
friends and acquaintances and is regarded as one of the worthy native sons 
of Knox county. 



OLIVER C. HAGAN. 



It is the progressive wide-awake men of aflfairs that makes the real 
history of a community, and his influence as a potential factor of the body 
politic is difficult to estimate. The examples such men furnish of patient 
])urpose and steadfast integrity strongly illustrate w-hat is in the power of 
each to accomplish, and there is always a full measure of satisfaction in 
adverting, even in a casual way, to their achievements in advancing the 
interest of their fellow men and in giving strength and solidity to the 



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704 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

institutions which make so much for the prosperity of the community. Such 
a man is the worthy gentleman whose name forms the caption of this bio- 
graphical review, and as such it is proper that a resume of his eminently 
commendable career be accorded a place among the representattive citizens 
of the city and county in which he resides. 

Oliver C. Hagan, well known gas and oil man of Mt. Vernon, was 
bom May 17, 1853, '" Clarion county, Pennsylvania. He is the son of 
William and Mar>' Jane (Rairden) Hagan, the father a farmer and lum- 
ber man, who never became a resident of Ohio. 

Oliver C. Hagan grew up on the home farm and when old enough 
assisted with the work there and in the lumber business, attending the dis- 
trict schools in the mean time. When .seventeen years of age he became 
interested in the oil business and first secured employment with operators 
at Parker's Landing, Pennsylvania. Later he went to northern \ew York 
and operated in that locality for some years. In the intervening years up to 
1894 he operated in the fields of Pennsylvania, northern New York and 
West Virginia, gaining a vast amount of information and experience along 
all the diflferent lines of the business from field man to operator. In 1894 
he came into the Ohio field, locating at New Lexington, Perry county, oper- 
ating in all the counties of that section of the state both as a contractor and 
oil producer. For about two years he operated independently and met with 
considerable success. In 1896 he realized the practicability and saw the 
advisability of co-operation and with this idea he became one of the pro- 
moters and organizers of the Ohio Fuel Company as one of the first stock- 
holders and directors of the company. The organization of this company 
resulted in the consolidation of a number of small companies and individual 
interests in the southern Ohio oil field, and Mr. Hagan has been actively 
connected with the management and operation of the company from its or- 
ganization and has charge of all the drilling department of the company in 
its Ohio territory. The company organized with a capital stock of seven- 
teen thousand dollars and with one or two producing wells; today it is capi- 
talized at fifteen million dollars, with over six hundred producing wells and 
supplies most of the principal cities of southern Ohio with fuel gas. Mr. 
Hagan is also a stockholder in the United Fuel Company, operating in West 
Virginia with about three hundred producing gas wells and one hundred and 
fifty producing oil wells. In 1906 Mr. Hagan became a resident of Mt. Ver- 
non and has since resided here, being nearer the center of the company's 
field of operations. As superintendent and manager of the producing depart- 
ment of the Ohio Fuel Company, Mr. Hagan has drilled over four hundred 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 705 

wells up to March i, 191 1. since coming to Mt. Vernon and fully seventy-five 
per cent, of these are producing wells, working sometimes as high as twenty- 
five diflferent drilling outfits and employing only the best expert operators. 

In May, 1896, the Hagan Drilling Company was organized with Mr. 
Hagan as president and general manager, operating all over southern Ohio 
for lx)th gas and oil, and, like the other concerns with which he has been 
connected, has grown rapidly and been very successful under his able man- 
agement and judicious counsel. Mr. Hagan is a recognized oil and gas 
expert and has probably done more than any other single individual to de- 
velop the Ohio field and he has extensive and valuable holdings. The Ohio 
Fuel Company has the largest pumping station in the world, located at 
Homer, just over the Knox county line in Licking county and this has been 
largely constructed and equipped during Mr. Hagan's management in this 
field. 

Mr. Hagan's entire life since he was seventeen years of age has been 
wholly given to gas and oil development and production and he has a most 
accurate knowledge of formations and conditions that are likely to produce 
oil and gas, which makes him a valuable asset in any field. He is an or- 
ganizer and promoter by nature, a man of keen discernment, rare business 
acumen and foresight, being enabled to foresee with remarkable accuracy 
the future outcome of a present transaction and he ranks with the leading 
business men of the state. 

Politically, Mr. Hag^n is a Democrat, but has never been active in party 
aflfairs, yet always interested in the welfare of his community and state and 
has kept w^ell informed on public matters. Fraternally, he is a thirty-second- 
degree Mason. Personally, he is pleasant, genial, courteous, makes and re- 
tains friends without eflfort, and, being honest and straightforward in his 
business relations, he has the good will and confidence of all who have come 
into contact with him. 

Mr. Hagan has been twice married, first, on October 12, 1872, at Boli- 
var, New^ York, to Catherine Albaugh, daughter of William and Mary Al- 
baugh, which union resulted in the birth of four children, namely: Minnie, 
who married Robert Dailey, of New Lexington, Ohio; Axie Olwilda mar- 
ried John Minesinger, of Granville, Ohio ; Luemma Gertrude married Arthur 
Denman, of Sedan, Kansas; William H., of Granville. Ohio. The wife and 
mother passed to her rest on August 12, 1890. Mr. Hagan*s second marriage 
was solemnized on October 12, 1892, to Ocie Oleta Hagerson, daughter of 
Asa and Elizal)eth Hagerson, of Bolivar, New York. This union has been 
without issue. The familv home, a modern, commodious and beautiful dvvell- 



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706 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

ing, is located on East Gambier street, Mt. Vernon, in one of the most de- 
sirable sections of the city, and here the many warm friends of the family 
frequently delight to gather, finding an old time hospitality and good cheer 
ever prevailing. 



MORTIMOR E. LYTLE. 

The essential conditions of human life are ever the same, the surround- 
ings of individuals differ but slightly, after all ; and when one man passes 
another on the highway of life to reach the goal of prosperity before others 
who perhaps started out before him, it is because he has. the power to use 
advantages which properly encompass the whole human race. Such thoughts 
are prompted by a study of the career and characteristics of Mortimor E. 
Lytle, of Mt. Vernon, Knox county, one of the leading oil and gas ex- 
perts in the Buckeye state, who has achieved his envied position solely 
through individual efforts, with many obstacles against him, but he has sur- 
mounted them one by one and his efforts have been crowned by success. 

Mr. Lytle was born on August 18, 1855, in Venango county, Pennsyl- 
vania, the son of William and Sarah (Fleming) Lytle. The father was 
born November 25, 1814, and died November 12, 1865: the mother's birth 
occurred on February 14, 181 5, and she died March 6, 1898. William Lytle 
was a carpenter and farmer, a man of sterling character : neither he nor his 
wife ever lived in Ohio. 

Mortimoi: E. Lytle spent his youth in his native county and attended 
the district schools. When only nine years of age he began work in the oil 
fields of his neighborhood and at the age of fifteen he was a competent 
driller. During his youth and young manhood he si>ent in the oil fields of 
Pennsylvania and New York, becoming proficient in all the departments of 
the work, being a keen observer by nature and having an insatiable desire 
to master all the ins and outs of this special field of endeavor. About 1881 
he became interested in gas development and was active in the gas fields. 
On account of failing health he went to Kansas in 1897 ^"d worked in the 
gas fields of that state until April, 1900, when he went to Los Angeles, Cal- 
ifornia, and took charge of a lease for the California Oil Company in that 
section of the state and materially assisted in its development. After a few 
months with this company he went to San Francisco and took charge of 
the drilling for an oil company whose fields were located about fourteen 
miles north of San Francisco. In February, 190T, he returned east and in 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. JOJ 

May of that year located at Martinsville, West Virginia, having found the 
West Virginia field an excellent one. He there assumed charge of a com- 
pany's business, both in the field and the distribution in cities, operating 
largely in West Virginia and southeastern Ohio. He remained with this 
company until the formation of the Ohio Fuel Supply Company, he being 
one of the promoters and organizers of the company, which was a combina- 
tion of a number of small companies operating in the same field. From the 
organization of this company, Mr. Lytle has been a stockholder and director 
and actively connected with its operations and management, and it is safe 
to say that its rapid growth and almost phenomenal success has been due 
in no small measure to his judicious counsel and able management. Upon 
the organization of the Ohio Fuel Supply Company, Mr. Lytle moved to 
Mt. Vernon and assumed charge of the oil and gas field development. The 
comi)any operates from Lorain county in the north to Hocking county in 
the south and has sunk about six hundred and fifty wells, fully eighty per 
cent, of which are producing wells. Mr. Lytle has spent his entire life in 
the gas and oil fields and is a recognized expert in the business. His wide, 
varied and successful experiences make him familiar with every phase of the 
business and he is now prominent in the aflfairs of one of the largest produc- 
ing companies in the oil and gas districts. A man of splendid business ca- 
pacity, keen discernment and rare foresight, coupled with fine executive 
ability, he is a tower of strength in any business concern and his name con- 
nected with any enterprise is enough to insure its success. 

Politically, Mr. Lytle is a Republican, but has never been active in party 
matters or a seeker after the honors or emoluments of office, yet he believes 
it the duty of every man to familiarize himself with public questions that 
he may be an intelligent voter, and he has ever stood ready to support any 
movement having as its object the upbuilding of his locality and state. Frater- 
nally, he is a thirty-second-degree Mason, with all the subordinate degrees. 

The domestic life of Mr. Lytle began on April 24, 1889, when he was 
united in marriage with Lillian S. Williams, a lady of many estimable 
traits, being the daughter of a highly honored New England family, Dwilly 
and Sarah (Brown) Williams, the father being a direct descendant of 
Roger Williams and the mother of General Mott, both famous colonial 
characters. Mrs. Lytle is a member of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Lytle three children have been born: Frederick, 
whose birth occurred on February 20, 1890, was graduated from the Ten- 
nessee Military Academy with the class of 1910 and is now a student of 



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708 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

the Ohio State University at Columbus, preparatory to a course in law; 
Lillian died in infancy; Gertrude May, born January 5, 1896, is a student 
in the Mt. Vernon high school. Mr. Lytle and family are members of the 
Presbyterian church. Their modern, attractive and commodious home is 
at No. 501 North Main street. 

Mr. Lytle is a man of strong personality, genial, sociable, straight- 
forward and honorable in all the relations of life, and a fine type of the 
successful, virile, sterling, self-made American. 



SILAS PARR. 



One of the influential and popular citizens of Mt. Vernon is Silas Parr, 
to whose career the reader's attention is now directed, who is ranked among 
the county's substantial business men. A man of upright character and 
excellent endowments, he has been a valued factor in local affairs and has 
ever commanded unequivocal confidence and esteem, being loyal to the up- 
building of this community and deeply interested in the progress of his 
adopted country and ever vigilant in his efforts to further the interests of 
this city along material, moral and civic lines. He has succeeded through 
his own efforts, having started out in life with but little assistance and he 
is eminently deserving of the rewards that have crowned his efforts. 

Mr. Parr was born in Devonshire, England, September i, 1848. He 
is the son of John and Susan (Ware) Parr» both natives of England, where 
they grew up and were married. The father was a shoemaker by trade and 
he and his wife remained in their native land until their deaths. 

Silas Parr remained under his parental roof-tree until he Was eighteen 
years of age, when he emigrated to America on the steamer *'City of Dub- 
lin,'* being three weeks on the voyage, meeting the famous steamer, "Great 
Eastern," on her return trip after laying the first Atlantic cable. Mr. Parr 
landed at Castle Garden, New York, but he remained there only a few hours, 
starting almost immediately on the journey to Mt. Vernon, Ohio, this being on 
election day, October 9, 1866. General Morgan and Columbus Delano were 
candidates for Congress, and Mr. Parr obtained his first glimpse of American 
politics. He started in life here with three dollars capital. He spent one 
dollar of this for four stamps with which to send letters home and fifty 
cents for a bed. Before coming to America he had been employed as page 
in a wealthv familv and had attended school onlv a short time. There were 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 7O9 

no free schools in England at that time and his parents were very poor, and 
from the time he was thirteen years old he had to earn his own living. He 
could find no employment in Mt. Vernon, so he went to Centerburg, Knox 
county, and worked as an apprentice on a shoemaker's bench for his board 
and room during the following winter. In the spring he returned to Mt. 
Vernon and for six weeks he looked for employment before he found any- 
thing to do. He had no money, but a kindly disposed woman took him in 
and provided him with lodging and board until he could find work. He 
finally found a place with the Cooper foundry as a riveter s helper at nine 
dollars per week. But the work was too hard for him to endure and after 
nine weeks here he gave up the job and began the shoemaker s trade with 
Thomas Trick, who is still living and working on the bench at the advanced 
age of eighty-six years. The subject remained with Mr. Trick for four years, 
when he engaged as a shoemaker with Christ Weaver, who died in 191 1, 
being ninety-two years old. Mr. Parr remained with this gentleman for 
three years, making boots exclusively, then he purchased a shop of his own 
in what is now known as the Jones block on West High street. Mr. Parr 
operated this shop for six years and had business enough to keep three men 
employed beside himself, making boots and shoes. His next venture in a 
business way was to open a retail store at No. no South Main street, in 
partnership with Theodore Seymore, under the firm name of Parr & Sey- 
more, which partnership continued about two years. Mr. Parr then located 
at No. 4 South Main street, buying an entire new stock and without a partner. 
After spending about two years in this location, he moved across the street 
on June i, 1892, to No. 3 South Main street, where he has been located ever 
since, having built up a large and ever increasing business, always carrying 
a large, up-to-date and carefully selected stock of goods. In addition to his 
shoe business, he has been interested in the gas and oil development of Knox 
county and his investments in this line have l^een very remunerative, though 
the shoe business has claimed his exclusive attention. In point of years in 
business he is the oldest shoe merchant in Mt. Vernon and he is well known 
throughout the county. 

Politically, Mr. Parr has always voted the Republican ticket, since he 
became of mature age, and while he has never been an office seeker he has 
always been interested in public matters. He is a member of the Knox county 
blind commission, and he has been active in all temperance movements since 
he was a boy, and has takei\ a very active part in the crusade against the 
saloons in Knox county. 

Mr. Parr has been twice married, first on April 29, 1873, to Elizabeth 



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7IO KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

Fisher, daughter of George and Emily Fisher, of Mt. Vernon. Her father 
was a farmer and his death occurred in 1895. His widow survives at the 
advanced age of ninety-two years. To Mr. Parr and his first wife two 
daughters were born, Edith, deceased, and Winifred, who married Charles 
E. Ayers, city editor of the Republican News, of Mt. Vernon; they have two 
children, a daughter and a son. Mr. Parr s first wife passed to her rest on 
July 15, 1883, and on December i, 1886, he was married to Harriet Arm- 
strong, daughter of Albert and Margaret (Shoup) Armstrong, of Mt. Ver- 
non, to which city they came from Richland county. Mr. Armstrong died 
many years ago, and his widow passed away on September 8, 1905. 

Mr. Parr has been a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
for many years, also the encampment. He belongs to the Improved Order 
of Red Men. He is a member of the board of trustees of the Young Men's 
Christian Association. He and his wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal 
church, in which he was a trustee for twenty years and he is now one of the 
stewards of the church. He has been a teacher in the Sunday school ever 
since he came to Mt. Vernon. For some time during his early career here he 
taught a class of colored men on Sunday afternoons. He taught many of 
the older members of the class to read. Mr. Parr holds membership with the 
Mt. Vernon Merchants Association and has serv^ed on important commit- 
tees of the same. He also belongs to the State Retail Shoe Men's Association 
and is a member of the committee on insurance for the purpose of formulating 
a plan of co-operative insurance. He is active in the deliberations of this or- 
ganization. He was a member of the Mt. Vernon Civic League and one of 
its very active workers. Although English born, he quickly became Ameri- 
canized, both in citizenship and sentiment. He visited his native country and 
the home of his youth in 1906, but returned to this country better satisfied 
with it than ever before, although having greatly enjoyed his stay in his native 
land. The family home is at No. 404 North Gay street. Mr. Parr has al- 
ways stood high in the estimation of the people of Knox county and he 
numbers his friends bv the score here. 



JOHN MILTON WILSON. 

One of the honored native sons of Knox county is John Milton Wilson, 
of Wayne township, where he carries on all departments of agriculture on 
his excellent farm with that discretion and energy which are sure to result 
in a large measure of success. While laboring for his own well-being he 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 7II 

has ever had the interests of his county at heart, lending such assistance as 
becomes a good citizen in promulgating the civic, industrial arjji moral tone 
of the county. His career has been one of hard work and integrity, conse- 
quently he is deserving of the respect in which he is held by everyone. 

Mr. Wilson was bom on December i, 1865, on a farm near where he 
now resides, five miles southwest of Fredericktown. He is the son of 
William and Sarah Ann (Hayes) Wilson, both natives of Wayne county, 
Ohio, and there they grew^ up, were educated and married, after which they 
moved to Michigan, where they remained about five years, when they 
moved to Wayne township, Knox county, Ohio, where they spent the re- 
mainder of their lives. The death of the father occurred on January 3, 
1898, and his widow died a year later and both are buried in the cemetery 
at Fredericktown. The father was a large land owner and extensive farmer 
and he raised great numbers of live stock which he prepared for the markets, 
especially sheep. Politically, he was a Republican, but was never an oflice 
seeker. He was a busy man of affairs and was influential in his community. 

Seven sons and six daughters constituted the large family of William 
Wilson and wife, and they are all still living except the oldest daughter, 
Elizabeth J., who became the wife of Alex White; Anna M. married Lewis 
McCurdy, of Bloomfield; Joseph R. lives in Fredericktown; Wesley Hayes, 
of Wayne township: William E. lives in Sparta: John Milton, of this sketch: 
Emma AHce, wife of William Brown, of Centerburg; Oliver D., of Center- 
burg; Richard B., of Wayne township; Clara M. married Samuel Myers, of 
Barberton, Ohio; Bertha married Clint Braydon, of Akron, Ohio; Hattie 
married Ray Cames, of Newark. 

John M. Wilson was reared on the home farm and there helped with 
the general work when a boy, attending the district schools in the winter time, 
in fact, he remained at home until his marriage, on June 3, 1899, to Maud 
Lyon, daughter of Stephen B. and Mary (Gloyd) Lyon, of Morrow county, 
Ohio. To this union one son has been born, Harold Newton. 

Since his marriage the subject has lived on the farm five miles south- 
west of Fredericktown, which place consists of two hundred acres of fine 
land, well improved and under a fine state of cultivation, and in connection 
wMth general farming he has for eighteen years been a breeder of thorough- 
bred Delaine sheep, raising the best for breeding purposes. He has achieved 
a wide reputation as a result of his fine stock, having from time to time sent 
his sheep all over the country, and, owing to the superior quality of his 
animals, they find a very ready sale, and many of them are exported to for- 
eign countries. He took second prize among sixteen exhibitors of Delaine 

(46) 



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712 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

sheep at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition at St. Louis in 1904 — in fact, he 
won second pjize in all exhibits. His flocks will average three hundred from 
which to draw his sales to breeders. 

Mr. Wilson is a member and one of. the directors of the Delaine- 
Merino Record Association, a national organization of breeders, and he has 
always taken an active interest in its deliberations. He has exhibited at the 
Ohio state fair every year for twenty-five years, and in former years he 
has been an exhibitor at various state fairs, and has always been a prize 
winner from his first exhibits. He is universally regarded as one of the 
foremost breeders of his breeds in this section of the state. In addition to 
his large sheep business, he farms on an extensive scale and in a scientific 
manner and he is regarded as one of the most desirable farmers in Knox 
county. The picturesque family home stands on an elevation, commanding 
a fine view of Mile Run valley. 

Politically, Mr. Wilson is a Republican and he is always interested in 
public matters, but he is not an office seeker. He is now one of the members 
of the Wayne township board of education. He and his family belong to 
the Methodist Episcopal church. He belongs to Wayne Grange, Patrons of 
Husbandry. He stands high in the various circles of the county and is a man 
whom everybody likes and respects, for his integrity, industry and obliging 
nature. 



GEORGE L. MARPLE. 

Examples that impress force of character on all who study them are 
worthy of record. By a few general observations may be conveyed an idea 
of the high standing of George L. Marple, of Fredericktown, Knox county, 
as a journalist and citizen. Nature seems to have endowed him with an 
unusual fidelity of expression and his w'onderfully facile pen has interested 
thousands of readers. He has been content to spend his life in his native 
locality whose interests he has ever had at heart and sought to promulgate 
whenever opportunity afforded, and his career has been such as to w^in the con- 
fidence and esteem of all who know him. 

Mr. Marple was born on July 17, 1861, in Fredericktown, Ohio, and 
he is the son of Ananias C and Mary E. (Edwards) Marple, the father a 
native of Pike township, this county. The Edwards family originally came 
from Frederick county, Mar>'land, they and the Marples lx)th being pioneers 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 713 

of this section of the Buckeye state and they have been more or less prom- 
inent in the affairs of Knox and adjacent counties for several generations. 
They crossed the Alleghanies from the east in old-fashioned covered wagons 
in true first settler style, the region lying west of the mountains at that time 
being largely a wilderness. Ananias C. Marple was a cooper by trade, also a 
brick maker and he made the brick for the Methodist Episcopal church in 
Fredericktown and here he spent most of his life. He was a Republican in 
politics and was active in public matters. He took an especial interest in 
school work and served on the local board of education for a period of fifteen 
years, and he was marshal of the town for several years. He was always 
an active member of the Methodist church, as was also his wife. They are 
both still living in Fredericktown, being now advanced in age, but hale and 
hearty. They are highly respected by a wide circle of friends and are truly 
a fine old pioneer couple, honest, industrious and hospitable. 

The son, George L., of this review, grew up in Fredericktown and at- 
tended the public schools and was graduated from the high school here in 
1880. When he had finished school he turned his attention to the newspaper 
field and began work in the office of the Free Press, learning the printer's 
trade, which he mastered in due course of time. He then worked in the office 
of the Semi-Weekly Tribune in Mt. Vernon for a year and a half. Returning 
to Fredericktown, he learned the painter's and i>aper-hanger's trades, which 
he has since followed, with much success, but he has kept in touch with the 
newspaper world, and for the past twenty years has been the Fredericktown 
correspondent of the Mt. Vernon Republican-N ezvs, daily and semi-weekly, 
also the Cleveland Leader. He has a keen news instinct and never lets the 
grass grow under his feet. 

Mr. Marple was married in September, 1892, to Alice Elben, daughter 
of Mrs. Mary (Deal) Elben. of Utica, Licking count>% Ohio. To this union 
three children have been born, namely: Marguerite, now seventeen years 
old ; Donald is fifteen years old, and Anna is now seven years of age. 

Politically, Mr. Marple is a Republican and he has long been active in 
public matters. He has served as a member of the county election board. 
He and his family belong to the Methodist Episcopal church, and he is a 
member of the official board. He is president of the Brotherhood, also presi- 
dent of the Beers Bible class, of the Methodist church, of which there are 
now ninety members, this being one of the celebrated Bible classes of the 
state. Mr. Marple is a man of exemplary character and of progressive ideas 
and he fills a useful niche in the structure of local affairs, religious, educa- 
tional, civic and material. 



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714 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

CHARLES M. HILDRETH. 

The gentleman of whom the biographer writes in the following para- 
graphs is widely known as one of the honored citizens of Knox county, 
Ohio, and for many years has been actively identified w^ith the varied inter- 
ests of his community. His well directed efforts in the practical affairs of 
life, his capable management of his own business interests and his sound 
judgment have brought to him prosperity, and his Hfe demonstrates what 
may be accomplished by the man of energy and ambition, who is not afraid 
to work and has the perseverance to continue his labors, even in the face of 
seemingly discouraging circumstances. 

Charles M. Hildreth, of Fredericktown, was born October 15. 1847, ^^^ 
Mt. Vernon, this county, and he is the son of John and Caroline (Eddy) 
Hildreth, the father bom in Knox county, Ohio, and the mother in Erie 
county, Ohio. The father, long a prominent contractor and carpenter, was 
an important factor in the building of Mt. Vernon. He was a man of high 
standing and clean character. Politically, he was a Republican and was 
always active and interested in whatever was for the betterment of local 
conditions. He was a soldier in the Civil war, a member of Company A, 
One Hundred and Forty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in which he ren- 
dered very efficient service for the Union. He was a member of the Baptist 
church. His death occurred in August, 1872, his widow^ surviving many 
years, having died in July, 1898. They are both buried in the cemetery at 
Mt. Vernon. 

The son, Charles M., spent his childhood and youth in Mt. Vernon and 
attended the public schools here. When fourteen years of age he began 
clerking in the store of John Eichelberger, with whom he remained about 
three years. During the four years following he clerked for W. C. Sapp, 
then was in the employ of J. E. Woodbridge as clerk for a i>eriod of thirteen 
years, or until Mr. Woodbridge's death, giving each of these gentlemen high 
grade and eminently satisfactor}^ service and in the meantime mastering 
every phase of the mercantile business. 

On October 31, 1877, ^^- Hildreth was united in marriage with Marian 
E. Tuttle, daughter of Samuel E. and Mary (Beach) Tuttle, of Frederick- 
town, a highly honored family of this vicinity. Mr. Tuttle came from Con- 
necticut in 1842, and a few years later married Mar}^ Beach. He was a man 
of great activity and for years was engaged in the mercantile business, also 
the grain, wool and produce business ; later in life he conducted a private loank 
in Fredericktown. He met with a large measure of success in whatever he 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 71$ 

turned his attention to. A man active in business and public affairs and 
higlily regarded in the community, he is deserving of a permanent place in 
his county's history. His death occurred in August, 1907, his wife having 
preceded him to the grave in September, 1899; they are both buried in the 
cemetery at Fredericktown. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hildreth have no family. After their marriage they took 
up their residence in Fredericktown and Mr. Hildreth began conducting a 
grain, wool and seed business, in which he has since continued, his trade ever 
increasing, and he is now one of the largest dealers in this line in this section 
of the state. His wool purchases have run from one hundred and eighty 
thousand to three hundred thousand pounds annually and his grain business 
has also been very extensive. For some time he owned and successfully op- 
erated the Fredericktown Roller Process Flour Mill, having recently leased 
the mill to other parties. 

Mr. Hildreth has for many years been an active and important factor 
in the business affairs of Knox county. He has also been active and influen- 
tial in public affairs, being a loyal supporter of the Republican party. While 
a resident of Mt. Vernon he was a member of the city council, at one time 
being president of the same. For a period of fourteen years he served as 
councilman in Fredericktown, and for four years he was postmaster here 
under President Harrison. In 19 10 he was real estate appraiser for Fred- 
ericktown and he raised the valuation from one hundred thirty-four thousand 
and four hundred dollars to six hundred and forty-four thousand dollars. 
His valuations were so equitable that there was scarcely a protest from prop- 
erty owners because of advanced valuations. He and his. wife are members of 
the Presbyterian church. Tliey are both favorities in the best social circles of 
the county. 



LOUIS B. ACKERMAN. 

The gentleman to a review of whose life and characteristics the reader's 
attention is herewith directed is amo/ig the favorably known and representa- 
tive citizens of Knox county. He has by his indomitable enterprise and pro- 
gressive methods contributed in a material way to the advancement of his 
locality during the course of a long and honorable career and has been fairly 
successful in his business enterprises, having been a man of energ};, sound 
judgment and honesty of purpose, and is thus well deserving of mention in 
this volume. 



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7l6 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Louis B. Ackerman, well known business man of Fredericktown and a 
worthy representative of one of our sterling pioneer families, was bom on 
August 17, 1839, in Middlebury township, this county. He is the son of 
John and Ida (Cook) Ackerman, the father born in Bedford county, Penn- 
sylvania, from which he came to Knox county, Ohio, in 181 1, with his par- 
ents, John and Amy (Barton) Ackerman, the father having come with his 
relatives to this county, first in 18 10, looked over the country and returned 
to Bedford county, Pennsylvania, then came Ixick to Knox county with his 
family in 181 1, making the overland trip in wagons. They settled in the 
dense woods and there erected a cabin and began clearing the ground. This 
country was then the abiding place of Indians and numerous species of wild 
game. The elder Ackerman entered one hundred and sixty acres from the 
government, later acquiring more land, aH of which he improved and became 
one of the well-to-do pioneers and was prominent in the affairs of the com- 
munity, and here the grandfather, John Ackerman, spent the remainder of 
his life. His son, John, father of the subject, spent his entire life on the 
same farm. He is remembered as a hard-working, honest, retiring man, who 
was satisfied with home life. He was a Democrat and a member of the 
Baptist church. He lived an upright life and was highly regarded. He was 
born on November 15, 1805, and his death occurred on September 3, 1873. 
His wife. Ida Cook, was born on March 8, 1807, and died December 23, 
1862, and they are lx)th buried in the Baptist cemetery; near Water ford, 
Knox county. 

The son, Louis B. Ackerman, of this review, spent his childhood and 
youth on the farm and attended the district schools. When fifteen years old 
he went to Chesterville Academy in Morrow county, Ohio, for two years. 
Later he attended the high school at Fredericktown for two years. After 
this he taught in the district and village schools of Knox county for twenty 
years, with intervals between, in which he worked on the home farm. He 
was very successful in his school work and became one of the most popular 
educators of this section of the country. In 1878 he located in Fredericktown 
with the intention of making it his permanent home and here engaged in the 
general insurance business. He became a notary public and met with much 
success in his new field from the first. This was the first general insurance 
office established in Fredericktown. Mr. Ackerman has occupied his present 
office in the Struble block for the past twenty-seven years, during which time 
he has built up a large and ever-growing business, also in real estate, deeds 
and mortgages. He has also drawn wills and settled estates. His two sons. 
William A., now cashier of the Xew Knox National Bank at Mt. Vernon, 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. JIJ 

and Charles E., cashier of the bank of Daniel St ruble & Son at Frederick- 
town, were for years and are yet associated with their father in this business. 

Mr. Ackerman was married on September 20, 187 1, to Sarah E. Cook, 
daughter of Asa C. and Margaret (Forsythe) Cook, of Wayne county, Ohio, 
and to this imion six children were born, those besides the two sons men- 
tioned above being: Ida C, who married John W. McKinney, a farmer of 
Middlebury township ; Ernest V. is a practicing physician of Fredericktown ; 
Edith E. married Ralph Heskett, a farmer of Morrow county, Ohio; Louis 
H. is teller in the New Knox National Bank of Mt Vernon. 

Politically, Mr. Ackerman is a Democrat and has long been more or 
less active in public matters. In earlier life he was a frequent delegate to 
county, district and state conventions. He has served as mayor of Fred- 
ericktown and on the local board of education, being clerk of the same for 
many years. He has always been actively interested in educational matters. 
He is a member of Thrall I^dge No. 170, Free and Accepted Masons, at 
Fredericktown, and the chapter and the commandery at Mt. Vernon. He has 
served in all the chairs of these orders. He is also a member of the Knights 
of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, having filled all the 
chairs in these also. He has always been active and prominent in fraternal 
circles. He and his family are members of the Presbyterian church, Mr. 
Ackerman being an elder in the same, occupying this position for many years 
and he has long been active in church and Sunday school work. He has been 
superintendent and a teacher for many years in the Sunday school. 

The family home is on West Sandusky street, believed by many to be 
the most desirable residence district of the city. Mr. Ackerman finds rec- 
reation in his garden, among his chickens, cows and horse. He is an honor- 
able, neighborly and pleasant gentleman whose friends are limited only by 
the bounds of his acquaintance. 



WILLIAM T. LEATHERMAN. 

Fealty to facts in the analyzation of the character of a citizen of the 
type of William T. Leatherman, well known business man of Centerburg, 
Hilliar township, Knox county, is all that is required to make a biographical 
sketch interesting to those who have at heart the good name of the com- 
munity, because it is the honorable reputation of the man of standing and 
affairs, more than any other consideration that gives character and stability 



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7l8 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

to the body politic and makes the true glory of a city or state revered at home 
and respected abroad. In the broad light in which things of good report ever 
invite, the name and character of Mr. Leatherman stand revealed and secure, 
and though of modest demeanor, with no ambition to distinguish himself 
in public position or as a leader of men, his career has been signally honorable 
and it may be studied with profit by the youth entering upon his life work. 

Mr. Leatherman was born on June 26, 1858, on a farm in Allen county, 
Ohio. He is the son of J. L. B. and Adelia (Weatheral) leatherman, the 
father a native of Washington county, Pennsylvania, and the mother of 
Richland county, Ohio, her birth having occurred on November 8, 1837, 
and her death on December 20, 1910. The father is still living and is active 
in the affairs of life, making his home at Herod, Ohio, a town which he had 
the honor of founding. He has long been actively engaged in various 
branches of business and he has l>een very successful as a business man. He 
has also farmed a great deal, and he has been active in public affairs. He is 
a large land owner in Allen county, and for many years he has been a large 
wool and stock buyer and also engaged in mercantile pursuits. Politically, 
he is a Republican and is prominent in the affairs and councils of his party. 
He has served as justice of the peace for thirty years and is still in office. He 
is also mayor of Herod. 

William T. Leatherman, of this sketch, spent his youth on the farm and 
attended the country district schools. At a very early age he began buying 
wool and stock with his father, soon becoming an expert in both lines of 
trade, remaining actively engaged in both in his native county until 1899, 
when he moved to Cardington, Morrow county, Ohio, and engaged in the 
hoop manufacturing business, and there he remained until 1901, when he 
moved his factory to Mt. Gilead, Morrow county, which he operated until 
1903. in which year he came to Centerburg. Knox county, and established a 
factory for the manufacture of both hoops and staves on a large scale. \Vhen 
in full operation he employs about forty men and his products go into almost 
every state in the Union, with also a heavy export trade to England, France. 
Germany and Italy. His plant is thoroughly equipped with ever>' device of 
modern pattern to facilitate his work and only skilled artisans are employed. 
He also continues to deal some in wool and live stock, and he has a fine farm 
of two hundred and ei^ity-three acres five miles north of Centerburg, just 
over the Morrow county line, which he supervises, carrying on general farm- 
ing and stock raising, mostly horses and sheep. He keeps his place under a 
high state of improvement and cultivation and it ranks well with the leading 
farmsteads of the county in every respect. He has erected in Centerburg, at 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 719 

large cost, one of the finest barns, with offices and teamster's quarters, in 
central Ohio. He also has interest in similar hoop and stove factories in San- 
dusky, Ohio. He is a stockholder in the Centerburg Savings Bank and other 
corporations and he is and has been a very busy man of affairs, possessing 
keen discernment and wise foresight which enables him to conduct large 
affairs and foresee with remarkable accuracy the future outcome of a present 
transaction. He has a modern and beautiful home. 

Mr. Leatherman was married first on December 21, 187 1, to Alice May 
Thompson, daughter of Henry and Catherine (McGinnis) Thompson, of 
Ada, Ohio, and to this union five children have been born, namely : Bert E. is 
married and is a practicing physician in Toledo. Ohio: Mertie Blanche mar- 
ried William Kentz, of Pine Bluff, Arkansas; Jesse B. is married and is 
living in Granville, Ohio; Grace T. married David Perry, of Croton, Ohio; 
Adelia M. married Joseph Robb, of London. Ohio. The wife and mother 
passed to her rest on August 2, 1894, and on January 15, 1896, Mr. Leather- 
man was united in marriage with Isabelle Turner, daughter of John and Har- 
riet (Brown) Turner, of Auglaize county. Ohio. This union has been with- 
out issue. 

Politically, Mr. Leatherman is a Republican and while a resident of 
Allen county he was active in party affairs, but has never been an office 
seeker. He served as a member of the Republican county central and execu- 
tive committees and was a frequent delegate to county, district and state con- 
ventions. His wife is a Baptist, but Mr. Leatherman belongs to no man- 
made creed or society, being an independent thinker, but broad-minded, lib- 
eral and progressive in all that the terms imply and always interested in the 
development of his town and county. He is a pleasant gentleman to know, 
unassuming, genial, obliging and of the highest integrity. 



DILLMAX C. OBERHOLTZER. 

The biographies of the representative men of a county bring to light 
many hidden treasures of mind, character and courage, well calculated to 
arouse the pride of their family and of the community and it is a source of 
regret that the people are not more familiar with the_ personal history of 
such men, in the ranks of whom may Ije found tillers of the soil, mechanics, 
teachers, as well as lawyers, physicians, bankers and members of other voca- 
tions and professions, Dillman C. Oberholtzer, well kno>vn jeweler and opti- 



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720 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

cian of Centerburg, Knox county, is distinctively one of the leading citizens 
of Hilliar township, and as such has made his influence felt among his fellow- 
men and earned a name for enterprise, integrity and honor that entitles him 
to worthy notice in a work of the nature of this volume. 

Mr. Oberholtzer was born May 23, i860, in Holmes county, Ohio, on 
a farm near Nashville. He is the son of Abram O. and Rebecca (Tidball) 
Oberholtzer, the father a native of Pennsylvania and the mother of Ohio. 
The father spent his early life engaged in agricultural pursuits, later in the 
hardware business in Centerburg, continuing the latter for a period of twenty- 
six years, during which time he enjoyed a large trade with the surrounding 
country and became one of the substantial and influential men of the country. 
In 1907 he retired from business and is now enjoying the fruits of his long 
years of endeavor: his wife passed away on May 14, 189 1. 

Mr. and Mrs. Abram O. Oberholtzer l>ecame the parents of five children, 
two of whom are living, Dillman C, of this sketch, and David A., of I^raine, 
Ohio. 

Dillman C. Oberholtzer spent his early l)oyhood on the farm, remaining 
there until he was nine years old. While the family was living at Water- 
ford, Knox county, he attended public schools there, then entered West- 
minster Academy at that place. The family came to Centerburg in 1879 
and here he has since resided. Soon after locating here he took up the jewelry 
business and this he has continued to the present time, his being still the only 
store of this kind in Centerburg. He carries a large, up-to-date and carefully 
selected stock and his customers come from remote parts of this vicinity, 
many of them having patronized him since he first established himself here, 
which is a criterion of his honesty and fairness to his patrons. He does all 
kinds o*f repair work in a skillful manner and this has been one of the largest 
departments of his business. He also maintains a finely equipped optical de- 
partment, with all modern appliances and he has won a wide reputation as a 
successful optician, having for years made a careful study of this science 
and obtained a degree of optometry. 

Mr. Oberholtzer was married on May 21, 1885, to Alice Smith, daugh- 
ter of William and Esther A. (Hopkins) Smith, a highly respected family. 
To this union two children were born, a son and a daughter, Grace and 
Charles O., the latter being married and is associated with his father in busi- 
ness. 

Politically, Mr. Oberholtzer is a Democrat and he has been active in 
party aflfairs. He has served Centerburg as mayor and has been a member of 
the town council, and for the past six years he has been township treasurer. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 721 

For a number of years he served as township clerk. He has been a frequent 
delegate to county, district and state conventions. As a public servant he has 
given the utmost satisfaction, being faithful and conscientious in the dis- 
charge of his every duty, reflecting much credit upon himself and to the satis- 
faction of all concerned. 

Fraternally, Mr. Oberholtzer is a member of Bloomfield Lodge No. 422, 
Free and Accepted Masons, of which he is a past master; he also belongs to 
Clinton Chapter No. 26, of Mt. Vernon, and Kinsman Council No. 72, of 
Mt. Vernon. He also belongs to Hawthorne Lodge No. 228, Knights of 
Pythias, being a charter member of the same, and has filled all the chairs of 
this lodge. He affiliates with the Methodist Episcopal church, of which his 
wife is a member. He is widely and favorably known to all classes and is a 
genial, obliging gentleman. 



LLOYD M. BELL. 



In Lloyd M. Bell, well known and capable editor and publisher of the 
Ccnterburg Gazette, we have a public-spirited, progressive citizen, belonging 
to the somewhat rare class that direct and control public sentiment without 
pushing self forward and without incurring the ill will of those with whom 
they come into contact, and leave the impress of their strong personality 
indelibly stamped upon the community, winning the good will of all classes. 

Mr. Bell was bom on March 8, 187 1, near West Carlisle, Coshocton 
county, Ohio. He is the son of Stephen and Julia (McKee) Bell, the father a 
native of Knox county and the mother of Coshocton county, Ohio, she being 
the daughter of George McKee, a member of the Ohio Legislature at one time 
and also a soldier in the Mexican w^ar. The father was a farmer and was 
long a resident of Coshocton county. He was a Democrat in politics and a 
member of the Disciples church. His death occurred in January; 1902. The 
mother is still living, making her home with the son, Lloyd M., of this sketch. 
These parents were representatives of sterling pioneer families who assisted 
in the early development of this locality. 

Lloyd M. Bell spent his youth on the farm and he attended the country 
schools. When he was twelve years old the family moved to Croton, Licking 
county, and there he remained for thirteen years and completed his public 
school education, later attending the Ohio Normal University at Ada, where 
he prepared himself for teaching, which profession he followed with much 
success for a period of five years in the rural schools of Licking county. In 



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722 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

April, 1896, he came to Centerburg, Knox county, and purchased the Center- 
burg Gazette, an independent newspaper which, under his able management, 
wields a potent influence in this locality. He has greatly increased its circu- 
lation, improved its mechanical appearance and rendered it much more valua- 
ble as an advertising medium, keeping its columns filled with crisp, important 
news of the day and its editorial page is ably and convincingly set forth. 

Politically, Mr. Bell is a Democrat and he has been active in public and 
party affairs. He has been a member of the Democratic county executive 
committee, and a frequent delegate to county, district and state conventions. 
He is a member of the county board of elections and in 19 10 he was candi- 
date for county treasurer of Knox county. Something of his high standing in 
his own township w ill be seen from the fact that he received there a majorit>' 
of two hundred and seventy-six votes, in a Republican township, a record un- 
precedented in the political history of the county. 

Mr. Bell was married on October 20, 1898, to Gertrude Hasson, daugh- 
ter of Marvin F. and Hattie (Rinehart) Hasson, an influential Centerburg 
family. To this union two children have been born, Rusler H. and Hattie 
Louise. 

Fraternally, Mr. Bell is a member of the Masonic order and the Clinton 
Chapter and Kinsman Council of Mt. Vernon. Also a member of Hawthorne 
Lodge No. 228, Knights of Pythias. He and his wife belong to the Order of 
the Eastern Star. He is a member of the Disciples church, while his wife 
belongs to the Methodist Episcopal chruch. 

Mr. Bell uses his paper for the encouragement of all measures looking 
to the general good of Centerburg and adjacent community and he wields a 
wide influence in this respect. 



CLARK SCHOOLER. 

One noticeable fact in writing the history of Knox county is that so 
many of her citizens have been born and reared here. These people have 
been content to stay at home, to follow, for the most part, the vocations of 
their ancestors. It is a very common thing to find farms in the various town- 
ships composing the county of Knox upon which the same families have re- 
sided for several generations, some of them having been settled by the grand- 
fathers a century ago when the country was a wilderness. This is an indica- 
tion of at least two things — that this is a very favored farming locality, one 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 723 

in which the tiller of the soil is suitably rewarded for his pains, and also that 
the people are contented with their lot, are not unsettled, dissatisfied, and 
therefore they can accomplish more and make better citizens. One is indeed 
fortunate who can remain **under the roof that heard his earliest cry,'' as 
wrote the poet Tennyson, but for some reason or other very few of us are so 
fortunate. So Clark Schooler, farmer and stock raiser of Jackson township, 
this county, is to be envied, for he has spent his life on the same farm, hav- 
ing been born on the place he now owns here on Octol^er 7, 1866. He is the 
son of William Allen Schooler and Elizabeth J. (Blunt) Schooler. His 
paternal grandparents, Joseph and Marion (Clark) Schooler, who were of a 
large family, were early settlers in Knox county. He became a large land 
owner and influential citizen, being the wealthiest man in Jackson township 
at the time of his death. He was twice married, and had two sons by his first 
wife and about seven or eight children by his second marriage. Both these 
grandparents died here. The maternal grandparents, James and Mary 
(Ross) Blunt, were also early settlers here. William Blunt, the great- 
grandfather, entered the land on which the subject now lives, being a pioneer, 
having come here from Dresden, Ohio. James Blunt was born here, and was 
reared and married and reared his family here, dev^oting his life to farming. 

The father, William A. Schooler, was born in Knox county in 1843 ^^ 
1844, his wife, Elizabeth J. Blunt, having been born here about the same 
time. Here they grew to maturity, received such education as the common 
schools of their day afforded and here were married and spent their lives on a 
farm, the father dying somewhat suddenly of heart trouble when the subject 
was sixteen months old ; the mother subsequently married Harvey Burch, and 
they are both still living. One son was born on July i8th, after the death of 
William A. Schooler. The mother is a member of the Disciples church. 

Clark Schooler was reared on the home farm, where he began working 
very early and he received his education in the public schools of Jackson 
township. He lived on the home farm until 1881, when he moved to his 
stepfather s farm and was reared there, and early in life he took up farming 
as a vocation and lived with his stepfather until he was twenty-one years old, 
when he hired out and remained with the same man two years, then the 
mother gave the subject and his brother the privilege of dividing the home 
farm to suit themselves, and the subject soon added sixty acres to his original 
sixty, being now the owner of one hundred and fifty acres of well improved 
and well cultivated land, the equal of any in Jackson township, and here he 
carries on general farming and stock raising. He has a pleasant home and 
has been very successful. 



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724 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Politically, Mr. Schooler is a Democrat, but has never been especially 
active in public affairs. Years ago he joined the Disciples church. 

On May 29, 1890, Mr. Schooler was united in marriage with Addie 
Wolfe, daughter of John and wife, old settlers here, a complete sketch of 
whom appears elsewhere in this work. 

To the subject and wife three children have been bom, namely: Edith, 
who married Percy Donohue, lives near Galena, Delaware county, Ohio; 
Evelyn and Wave. 



CHARLES M. GRUBB. 

That the plenitude of satiety is seldom obtained in the affairs of life is 
to be considered a most beneficial deprivation, for when ambition is satisfied 
and every ultimate aim realized, if such be possible, individual apathy must 
follow. Effort would cease, accomplishment be prostrate, and creative talent 
waste its energies in inactivity. The men who have pushed forward the 
wheels of progress have been those to whom satisfaction lies ever in the 
future, who have labored continuously, always finding in each transition 
stage an incentive to further effort. Charles M. Grubb, long one of the 
ablest and most popular educators of this locality, now^ numbered among the 
progressive business men of Centerburg, is one whose well directed efforts 
have gained for him a position of prominence in the various circles in which 
he has been pleased to move, and it is with a feeling of satisfaction that the 
writer essays the task of touching briefly upon the salient points in his career. 

Mr. Grubb was born on September 29, 1867, on a farm in Morris town- 
ship, Knox county, Ohio. He is the son of Henry and Mary Ann (Jeffries) 
Grubb, both parents born in this county, each representing prominent pioneer 
families. Here these parents grew to maturity, received their educations in 
the old-time schools and were married ; the father has devoted his life to agri- 
cultural pursuits and he and his wife are now living in Monroe township. 
Politically, he is a Democrat and has always been active in the affairs of his 
community, and is known as a man of upright character. 

Charles M. Grubb spent his childhood and youth on the home farm and 
assisted with the general work there when he became of proper age. He re- 
ceived his education in the county schools, later entering the Ohio Northern 
University at Ada, Ohio. Prior to entering this institution he taught several 
years. After spending two years in the university, he continued teaching in 
tlie cnimtry district schools. In 1899 he became connected with the public 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 725 

schools at Howard, this county, and during his ten years' service there he 
established a graded school system, also a high school, and his work there 
stands as a monument to his progressive and thorough methods and stamps 
him as a leader in educational work. For a period of seven years prior to 
taking up his work at Howard he taught in the Berry district in the same 
township. In September, 1904, he was appointed one of the board of school 
examiners of Knox county, and he served two terms or six years. He not 
only did his work conscientiously and according to the best modem methods, 
but he was always trying to raise the standard of the public schools, and he 
has done as much as any one for the cause of education in Knox county and 
for the same he has the esteem of all classes. During 1908 and 1909 he was 
president of the Knox County Teachers' Association, and during all the 
years of his teaching he was an active member of the same, also a member 
of the Ohio State Teachers' Association. 

Resigning as superintendent of the schools of Howard in 1909, Mr. 
Grubb moved to Centerburg and engaged in the furniture and undertaking 
business, under the firm name of Purdy, Kasson & Grubb, being associated 
with Denman H. Purdy and Willie M. Kasson. The firm also has a monu- 
ment department and they carry on an extensive business in all lines, han- 
dling the best of materials and goods, carrying a complete and carefully se- 
lected stock of furniture, prompt service and efficiency being their watch- 
\vord. The store contains a stock that would do credit to a city much larger 
than Centerburg, and their many customers come from all over a wide radius 
of territory. On September i, 191 1, the above firm dissolved partnership, 
Kasson & Grubb retaining the furniture and monument business and Mr. 
Purdy the undertaking business. 

Mr. Grubb was married on November 5, 1890, to Jennie Loney, daugh- 
ter of William and Mary (McClurg) Loney, an excellent family of Brown 
township, where Mr. Loney had a good farm, and where the mother is still 
living, he being deceased. Mrs. Grubb passed to her rest on July i, 1903. 
dying without issue. On July 22, 1905, Mr. Grubb was united in marriage 
with La Villa Critchfield, daughter of Holland and Margaret (McElroy) 
Critchfield, a prominent Howard township family, the Critchfields being 
among the early pioneers here and have been influential in local affairs for 
several generations. The parents of Mrs. Grubb are both still living. This 
second union has also been without issue. 

Politically, Mr. Grubb is a Democrat and he has always been an active 
participant in public matters, a close student on current aflFairs and conditions 
of the masses, and ever}^ movement having as its object the betterment of 



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726 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

his locality has received his hearty support, but he is not an office seeker. 
Fraternally, he is a Mason, a member of the chapter and commandery at Mt. 
Vernon, and the Danville lodge has bestowed upon him the master's degree; 
his membership is now with the Bloomfield Lodge No. 422 at Centerburg. He 
and his wife are members of the Church of Christ, he being an elder in the 
same, having held this office for a number of years; he is also an active Sun- 
day school worker and for many years was superintendent of the Sunday 
school at Howard, also teacher of a Bible class. While not a teacher, he still 
continues his interest in educational matters and has been largely instrumental 
in securing for Centerburg an excellent lecture course. He and his wife are 
prominent in the social life of the county, and few men are more widely or 
more favorably known in this locality than he. 



EMANUEL RINE. 



One of the young farmers of Knox county who has succeeded in life 
because he early learned to depend upon himself and to have system about his 
work and at the same time dealing honestly with his fellow men is Emanuel 
Rine, of Butler township. He is a man who believes in progress, in adapting 
himself to new and changing conditions, in following twentieth-century meth- 
ods of farming and therefore his place presents a pleasing appearance and 
shows at a glance that a gentleman of good taste and correct ideas has its 
management in hand. He comes down from a sterling old Buckeye ancestr}\ 
many of whose commendable qualities he seems to have inherited, being the 
son of Henry and Sarah Ellen (Jones) Rine, a complete sketch of whom is 
to be found on another page of this work, and he is the grandson of Rudolph 
Rine. His maternal grandparents were Samuel and Patsy (Miller) Jones. 
His parents were born in Coshocton and Knox counties, respectively, and 
were reared and married in the latter. The father became the owner of a 
good farm here. His family consisted of eleven children, nine of whom are 
still living, four sons and five daughters. 

Emanuel Rine was born in Coshocton county, Ohio, on September 9, 
1871, and in early life he came to Jackson township, Knox county, and here 
grew to manhood on the fami and received his education in the public schools, 
and early in life he took up farming for a livelihood. After leaving the home 
place he bought a farm of one hundred and fifty-two acres in Butler town- 
ship and here he has prospered through close application and good manage- 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 7-7 

ment, adding to his holdings from time to time until he is now the owner of 
about five hundred acres in Jackson and Butler townships, of valuable and 
highly productive land, which he has placed under a high state of improve- 
ment and cultivation. He carries on general farming and stock raising on an 
extensive scale, being widely known as a breeder of Delaine sheep, Poland- 
China hogs and Percheron horses, and owing to the superior quality of his 
fine stock he finds a very ready market for all he oflfers for sale. He has also 
bought live stock for some time and has been very successful in this line of 
endeavor. He also operates a threshing outfit during the summer months. 
Thus he is ahvays very busy and he has won a large measure of success, 
being now one of the substantial and progressive men of the eastern part of 
Knox county. 

Politically, Mr. Rine is a Democrat, arid while he takes an abiding in- 
terest in whatever tends to promote the general interest of the community 
and county, always lending his support in such measures as have for their 
object the material, civic and moral well-being of his locality, he has never 
aspired to positions of public trust. 

Mr. Rine was married to Mary A. Allen, a native of Butler township, 
Knox county, and the daughter of George Allen and wife, Mr. Allen being 
an old settler here, now about eighty years of age, the Allen family having 
long been a well known and highly respected one here. Four children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Rine, named as follows: George Henry,' born 
July 23, 1890, and Howard, bom April 8, 1892. are both living at home; the 
third and fourth children, twin sons, uniiamed. 

Personally, Mr. Rine is a pleasant gentleman to meet, genial, obliging 
and straightforward in all the relations of life. 



HENRY RINE. 



Few lives in Knox county furnish a more worthy example of the wise 
application of sound business principles and safe conservatism as that of 
Henry Rine, well known farmer of Butler township. The story of his suc- 
cess is not long nor does it contain many exciting chapters, but in it lies one 
of the most valuable secrets of the prosperity which it records; his career is 
replete with interest and incentive, no matter how lacking in dramatic action. 
The record of a noble life, consistent with itself and its possibilities in every 
particular, and the youth whose destinies are vet matters for the future to 

(47) 



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728 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

determine may well contemplate it with a view of gaining valuable lessons 
therefrom, for Mr. Rine has been a man of indomitable industry, public spirit 
and exemplary habits, thus eminently deserving of his material success and 
the esteem in which he is held by all who know him. 

Mr. Rine was bom in Coshocton county, Ohio, October 16, 1847. He 
is the son of Rudolph and Mary Ann (Underwood) Rine. The paternal 
grandparents, William and Nancy (Rine) Rine, were first cousins; they were 
bom and reared in Maryland and came to Ohio in a very early day, locating 
in Coshocton county, where he became the owner of one hundred and sixty 
acres of land, for which he paid only one dollar and fifty cents per acre. This 
he cleared and improved, and there established a good home, in which he 
spent the rest of his life. The maternal grandparents, Obed Underwood and 
wife, were also natives of Maryland, from which state they came to Coshoc- 
ton county about eight years after the Rine family came here, and also en- 
tered government land in Jackson township, Knox county, which he cleared 
and lived for a number of years, later moving to another farm on which his 
death occurred, in the same neighborhood where he first settled. 

Rudolph Rine, the father of the subject, was born in Coshocton county 
and his wife, Mary Ann Underwood, was born in Knox county and here 
they were married. He was a farmer and became the owner of about two 
liundred acres of land in Knox and Coshocton counties. Politically, he was 
a Democrat and was active in party affairs. He served as assessor in Knox 
county and as justice of the peace in Coshocton county. His family con- 
sisted of four children, three of whom are still living, namely : Henry, of this 
sketch; Casper, and Mrs. Malinda Jones, a widow. The first wife of Ru- 
rlolph Rine dying, he subsequently married Elizabeth Bucy, of Jefferson 
township, and to this union thirteen children were born, of whom alx>ut 
eleven are still living. The death of Rudolph Rine occurred on March 12, 
about 1896, and his first wife, mother of the subject, died in 1849. 

Henry Rine, of this sketch, w^as reared on the home farm and was edu- 
cated in the subscription schools of his time and when a young man he took 
up farming for a livelihood. He w^orked by the day for four years, then rented 
land of his father for four years, then bought forty acres to start on and 
finally became the owner of one hundred and forty acres in Knox county, 
where he has been engaged successfully in general farming and stock raising, 
keeping his place well improved and highly cultivated, and he has a pleasant 
home and substantial outbuildings. He has lived retired since 1907, in which 
year he w^as stricken with paralysis in one side. 

Politically, Mr. Rine is a Democrat, and he has served his township as 
supervisor, and in other capacities. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 729 

Mr. Rine was married on November 12, 1868, to Sarah Ellen Jones, a 
native of Knox county and the daughter of Samuel and Patsy (Miller) Jones, 
old settlers here, having come from Pennsylvania, and he devoted his life to 
farming. His family consisted of eight children. Politically, Mr. Jones is a 
Democrat, but not active. His wife is a member of the Baptist church. 

Eleven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Rine, named as follows : 
Willis Howard died when one year old ; Emanuel, a farmer of Butler town- 
ship, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this volume; Emma Jane is the wife 
of Lewis Bucy; Orpha Dell; Andrew; Rebecca is deceased; Harfer, Grover 
Cleveland, Hattie May, Ada and Clara. 



ROSS E. HUNTER. 



The record of the gentleman w^hose name introduces this article contains 
no exciting chapter of tragic events, but is replete with well defined purposes 
which, carried to successful issue, have won for him an influential place in 
the business circles of Knox county and high personal standing among his 
fellow citizens, among whom he has spent his earthly years, having been 
content to remain in his native locality. Mr. Hunter's life w^ork has been one 
of unceasing industry and perseverance and the systematic and honorable 
methods which he has ever followed have resulted not only in gaining the 
confidence of those with whom he has had dealings, but also in the building 
up of a large farming industry and the accumulation of a competency, own- 
ing a valuable estate in Union and Jefferson townships. 

Ross E. Hunter was born oh January 16, i860, on the farm where he 
now lives one mile south of the town of Brink Haven, Ohio, and he is the son 
of Richard and Lavina (Workman) Hunter and a brother of Osborne Hun- 
ter, a sketch of whom appears on another page of this work. The father of 
the subject, who was born in Union township, Knox county, Ohio, spent his 
life here engaged in agricultural pursuits on the farm where he w^as born. The 
mother of the subject was a native of Coshocton county, this state. The 
paternal grandfather, Richard Hunter, was one of the earliest pioneers of 
Knox county, having emigrated from the state of Maryland to Union town- 
ship in 1 81 2 and here spent the remainder of his life. He began in an 
humble way and in due course of time had a good farm and was one of the 
leading men in his community. On the farm which he settled the father of 
the subject of this review was born, reared and, in fact, spent his life. He was 



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730 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

very successful as a farmer and was a highly respected man. He was 
a Democrat, but not a seeker of public favors. He and his family were 
members of the Baptist church. The death of Richard Hunter, Jr., oc- 
curred on December 9, 1891, his widow surviving until 1903. Their family 
consisted of five children, named as follows: Osborne, a farmer of Union 
township, this county; Norman lives in Buckeye City; Ella, wife of Charles 
H. Biggs, of Union township; Ross E., of this sketch; Ham is a practicing 
physician of Columbus, Ohio. 

Ross E. Hunter has always lived on the place where he now resides. 
He was educated in the country district schools and the normal school at Dan- 
ville. He was married on December 2^, 1887, to Laura M. Hess, daughter 
of John H. and Susan E. (Calhoun) Hess, of Danville, this county, a prom- 
inent pioneer family from Maryland, and here Mrs. Hunter grew to woman- 
hood and received her education in the local schools. 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hunter : Archie D., who 
is married and living in Johnstown, Nebraska, is proprietor of a telephone 
system, of Brown county, that state; Donna Opal is teaching in the schools of 
Knox county ; Naomi Lucile is attending the high school in Danville. 

Mr. Hunter has kept the old home place well improved and under an 
excellent state of cultivation, keeping the soil from growing thin with ad- 
vancing years. In connection with general farming he carries on stock rais- 
ing of all kinds extensively. He is the owner of two hundred acres of valu- 
able land, one hundred and sixty lying in Union township and forty in Jef- 
ferson township. He has a commodious, modern and attractive home, excel- 
lent barns and stock sheds. His home is picturesquely located on the east 
bank of the Mohican river amid most attractive surroundings, and, the family 
being prominent in the social life of the community, this hospitable and cheer- 
ful home is frequently the gathering place for their many friends. He is the 
only representative of the original pioneer families of this vicinity who still 
resides here. 

Politically. Mr. Hunter is a Republican and has long been active in party 
affairs, always to be seen at the local caucuses, and on several occasions lie 
has been a meml>er of the Republican county committee, also a frequent dele- 
gate to party conventions, in which he has always made his influence felt for 
both the good of his community and the party. He served two terms as town- 
ship trustee, refusing a third election. For many years he has been a mem- 
ber of the township board of election. He and his family are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church of Danville and are active in church and Sunday 
school work. Mr. Hunter is one of our most public-spirited citizens and he 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 73 1 

never witholds his support from any movement looking to the general good 
of the community. He has done much for the cause of good roads, being one 
of the promoters of the good roads movement in Union township, and is 
active in all other laudable improvements, being especially active in educa- 
tional affairs. Personally, he is a genial, honorable and broad-minded gentle- 
man whom it is a pleasure to know and he has ever held the confidence and 
esteem of his neighbors and acquaintances, keeping untarnished the escut- 
cheon of an old and honored family name. 

Archie D. Hunter, son of the immediate subject of this sketch, whom 
we mentioned in a preceding paragraph, was married on October 23, 1909, 
to Iva \Vorkman,*daughter of Alonzo R. and May (Daniels) Workman, for- 
merly of Knox county, now residents of Brown county, Nebraska, where they 
have become well established. To Archie D. Hunter and wife one child, a 
daughter, has been born, lola Lucile, a winsome and bright little lass, the 
light of their home. Young Hunter is giving much promise as a business man 
and is popular in his community in the western state. 



URIAH TAYLOR COOKSEY. 

A citizen of the United States can wear no greater badge of honor than 
the distinction of having served the government in the four years of war 
between the states. It is a sacred family inheritance of renown, to be prized 
like a jewel by all future descendants and kept bright and untarnished by 
other acts of valor, patriotism and loyalty in the interests of free govern- 
ment. Even in this day when there are many of the old soldiers still living, 
no one can see a veteran of the great army that suppressed the hosts of re- 
bellion and treason, dressed in his faded uniform, without feeling a glow of 
pride, and without showing him studied deference. But the ranks of the old 
phalanx are fast going down before the only foe that they cannot meet and 
vanquish, and ere long death, with his sc-ythe so keen, will have wrought 
such widespread devastation that none will be left to recount the actual ex- 
perience of that sanguinar)' conflict. In the meantime, while they are still 
with us, let us pay suitable honor to their sacrifices, patriotism and sufferings. 

One of these old soldiers whom it is a pleasure to write of in this con- 
nection is Uriah Taylor Cooksey, farmer of Clay township, Knox county, 
who was born on November 22, 1848, near Dresden, Muskingum county. 



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732 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

this state. He is the son of Laban and Rheuan (Ogle) Cooksey. These par- 
ents came from Virginia with the pioneers and first settled in Muskingum 
county, moving from there to Licking county in 1850 and there they spent 
the remainder of their Hves, having followed agricultural pursuits. 

Uriah T. Cooksey was reared on the home farm and when but a l>oy 
learned the meaning of hard work there. He received such education as he 
could in the country district schools. When the Civil war came on, he, like 
the patriotic boys with whom he was reared, wanted to go to the front, but 
was not old enough, so he waited patiently through more than three years of 
it until on February 29, 1864, when but a few months over seventeen years 
of age, he enlisted in Company H, Thirty-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and 
he seryed until the close of the war in the Amiy of the Cumberland, partici- 
pating in General Sherman's famous campaigns about Atlanta and from that 
city on the great march to the sea. He proved to be a very faithful sojdier 
and never shirked his duty, taking the rough and dangerous work with as 
much courage as the oldest veteran in his regiment, according to his com- 
rades. After peace had been declared he marched with his regiment in the 
Grand Review in the national capital. Among the numerous engagements 
in which he participated was that of Bentonville, North Carolina, one of the 
very last of the war. He escaped without being wounded or taken prisoner 
any time during his service. After the war he returned to the 'family home 
in Licking county, Ohio, and engaged in farming, remaining with his parents 
until his marriage, on September 4, 1870, to Nancy Winse, daughter of Jo- 
seph and Jennie Wimse, of Licking county. 

To the subject and wife nine children have been born, eight of whom are 
living, namely: Charles F., who lives near Fulton, Nebraska; James L. lives 
at Red Oak, Iowa ; Rosanna married Dennis Evans and they live in Licking 
county; Zona D. married George Divan, of Clay township; Hugh L. lives in 
Clay township; Hermie D. is at home; Arthur J. Cooksey lives near Fulton, 
Nebraska; Bessie May also lives at home; Eli Harrison is deceased. 

In 1871, one year after his marriage, Mr. Cooksey moved to Clay town- 
ship, Knox county, and here he has remained to the present time, engaged in 
general farming and stock raising. He has a good farm of one hundred and 
eighty-eight acres and a pleasant home, being one of the leading farmers of 
this part of the county. 

Politically, he is a Republican and has always been a loyal, consistent 
party supporter, but has never been an office seeker. He is a member of 
Updike Post, Grand Army of the Republic. He and his family are very 
highly regarded throughout the community. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 733 

WALTER B. FARMER. 

One of the enterprising, twentieth-century farmers and stock men of 
Knox county is Walter B. Farmer, of Union township, for many years 
known as one of our most successful educators. He occupies a prominent 
place in the esteem of the people of this locality and is universally respected 
as a citizen, fair dealing having ever been his watchword in his business 
relations with his fellow men. He is a cultured, broad-minded gentleman 
whom it is a pleasure to meet, being optimistic, looking on the bright side 
of life and never complains at the rough places in the road, knowing that 
life is a battle in which no victories are won by the slothful, but that the 
prize is to the vigilant and strong of heart. His example has indeed been 
salutary to the youth of Knox county. 

Mr. Farmer was born on July 5, 1868, in Butler township, Knox county, 
Ohio, the son of Doty and Hettie (Giffin) Farmer, the father a native of 
Harrison township, this county, and the mother a native of Coshocton county. 
Doty Farmer was a Democrat up to 1861, when he turned Republican, his 
sympathies during the war between the states being with the Union. He 
was a faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal church. His death oc- 
curred in May, 1893. The mother of the subject, a woman of splendid at- 
tributes, is still living. 

Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Doty Farmer, namely : Viola, 
deceased; Warren, a farmer of Union township; Dora M. has remained 
single and is living at home; Walter B., subject of this sketch 

Walter B. Farmer was reared on the home farm and educated in the 
country district schools and the Danville Normal School. Early in life he 
began to prepare himself for teaching, and, having become well equipped 
for his chosen calling, he followed the same with exceptional success for a 
period of eight years in the Knox county schools. 

Mr. Farmer was married on December 25, 1898, to Jennie McKee, 
daughter of Charles H. and Priscilla (Ferenbaugh) McKee, of Union town- 
ship, this county, where she grew to womanhood and received her educa- 
tion and where both of her parents were born and have always lived. Mr. 
McKee is still living, his wife being deceased. The family is well known 
and highly respected in this locality. To Mr. and Mrs. Farmer four children 
have been bom. one of whom died in infancy; Cletus A., Hazel M. and 
Bernard L. being the sur\'iving children. 

After his marriage, Mr. Farmer entered the railway mail service, in 
which he remained eight years, giving entire satisfaction and winning the 



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734 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

confidence and praise of the department. In 1906 he resigned from the 
service and turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, one and one-half 
miles southeast of Danville, Union township, where he has a fine farm of 
one hundred and eighty-seven acres which he has brought up to a high state 
of improvement and cultivation and on which he is engaged successfully in 
general farming and stock raising and feeding, keeping a good grade of all 
kinds of live stock, employing modern ideas in all his work. 

Politically, Mr. Farmer is a Republican and has long been conspicuously 
active in local political matters, only so far as he feels that he is able, through 
his influence, to better the condition of his commimity and his country. He 
Jias kept fully abreast of the times in all matters, being ever a student and 
wide miscellaneous reader, his pleasant home being supplied with good litera- 
ture. Fraternally, he is a member of the Twin City Grange, Patrons of 
Husbandry. He is a church goer and supporter, though not a member of 
any congregation. He is a strong advocate of anything that makes for the 
moral and intellectual uplift of the people, and he is an agitator for good 
roads and all improvements in a material way consistent with the good of the 
people. 



CLEM L. V. BLUE. 

It is the pride of the citizens of this country that there is no limit to 
which natural ability, industry and honesty may not aspire. A boy born in 
ignorance and poverty and reared under the most adverse circumstances and 
unpromising surroundings may nevertheless break from the fetters and rise 
to the highest station in the land, the most noticeable example of all history'- 
of this being that of Lincoln, who, in early life, was, as every one knows, 
a poor rail-splitter and his home was a backwoods log cabin. These condi- 
tions give the youth of America ambition to push forward to achievement 
even in the face of obstacles. One of the citizens of Knox county who has 
done this is Clem L. V. Blue, farmer of Jackson township, having worked 
liis wav to a comfortable station in life. 

Mr. Blue was born in the township where he still resides on March 8, 
1863. He is the son of Hamilton and Adeline (Whitmore) Blue. His pa- 
ternal grandparents, Daniel and Eva Blue, were natives of Wheeling. West 
Virginia, but which was in the Old Dominion at that period, and there they 
spent their early lives, but emigrated to Knox county, Ohio, very early. 
Grandfather Blue was a soldier in the war of 1812, and it is ])robab!e that 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 735 

he came to Knox county at the close of that war. He took up land from the 
government and lived the life of the average pioneer of his time, redeeming 
a good* farm from the heavy woods and undergoing the usual hardships of 
the times. The maternal grandparents, Jacob and Elizabeth Whitmore, were 
natives of Pennsylvania, where they spent their childhood, coming to Knox 
county, Ohio, very early, locating in Harrison township where they, too, un- 
denvent the usual struggles of the newcomers to a new country. 

Hamilton Blue, mentioned above, was born in Jackson township, this 
county, in 1834, and Adeline Whitmore, his wife, was born in Harrison 
township, this county, in 1837. They grew up in Knox county, attended the 
old-time schools here and were married. The father was a farmer and 
became the owner of four hundred acres of good land where he carried on 
general farming and stock raising on an extensive scale. Politically, he 
was a Democrat until Cleveland's first administration: after that he was a 
Republican. He was a man of fine character and was well and favorably 
known. His family consisted of seven children, ^ix of whom are hving. the 
eldest one, Willis A., dying in 1909. Hamilton and Adeline Blue were mem- 
bers of the Christian Union church. The father's death occurred on June 30, 
1906, and the mother died on February 8, 1897. 

Clem L. V. Blue, of this sketch, grew to manhood on the home farm, 
where he assisted with the general work, and he received his education in 
the public schools of Knox county. He has always l)een a farmer and he 
managed his father's place for some time. In T902 he 1)ought a portion of 
the home place and he now owns eighty acres, where he carries on general 
farming and stock raising and which he has kept well improved and tilled in 
such a skillful manner that it has retained its original fertility. 

Politically, Mr. Blue is a Democrat. He has served his township as 
trustee. He and his wife were members of the Disciples church for nineteen 
years. 

Mr. Blue was married on October 11, 1888, to Josephine Horn, a native 
of Harrison township, this county, and the daughter of Martin and Eliza- 
beth Horn, old settlers there, her grandfather, Joseph Horn, having been 
among the early pioneers of that vicinity. One daughter has been born to 
the subject and wife, to whom the name Inez L. was given. 

Joseph and Susan Horn, grandparents of Mrs. Blue, were natives of 
Pennsylvania, where they grew up, and from there they came to Ohio about 
1810, locating in Harrison township where they reared most of their family. 
The country was then a wilderness and the haunts of Indians and wild beasts. 
Her maternal grandparents. George and Mary Adrian, were also from Penn- 



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736 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

sylvania and very early settlers in Knox county. Both her parents were 
born in Knox county, her father becoming an extensive farmer, owning 
about four hundred acres of land here at the time of his death. His 
family consisted of ten children, all of whom are living, the oldest 
being now sixty years of age and the youngest forty. The death of Mrs. 
Blue's father occurred on October 9. 1910, having survived his wife twenty- 
seven years, her death occurring on March 10, 1883. Mr. Horn was a stanch 
Democrat and took much interest in public affairs. 



DAVID P. CLUTTER. 

The great task in early years of clearing land of its timber can scarcely 
be realized by the people of today. Not a crop could be sowed or an orchard 
tree planted until the timber had been cut down and removed, either by fire 
or with horses or oxen. Even then the stumps were a great hindrance and it 
was usually several years until they were out of the way entirely, for they 
had to rot out, the pioneers having neither dynamite nor modem stump- 
pullers. The amount of hard labor required to remove the wilderness growth, 
break the wild land, intertwined with a vast network of roots, and to keep 
sprouts and weeds from choking the young crops, seems almost incredible, in 
fact, it was a task that never ended and all members of the family were re- 
quired to assist, not only from sun to sun, but from dawn to nightfall, and 
not many days were included in the *'rainy'' list either, most of the three 
hundred and sixty-five days being appropriated from a standpoint of neces- 
sity. But this persistence in all instances brought the coveted success in the 
future years, and in time the bare, productive acres were spread out on all 
sides of the primitive home, and soon supported growing crops and browsing 
herds. This was the task set before the ancestors of David P. Clutter, 
farmer of Morgan township, Knox county, and the task was faithfully per- 
formed; but the children were required to 'assist, and thus they grew up in 
industry and simple habits. 

Mr. Clutter was born on October 13, 1849, ^^ the farm a half mile 
north of Morgan Center, Knox county, Ohio, and here he has always lived. 
He is the son of David B. and Lavina (Cline) Clutter. Grandfather Samuel 
Clutter and his wife, known in her maidenhood as Rachael Denman, came to 
Knox county from Washington county, Pennsylvania, arriving in Morgan 
township, this county, on April 18. 18 18, and settled on the farm where the 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. T^ 

immediate subject of this sketch now lives. The country was then a vast 
stretch of heavy woods and wild game was in abundance and the sight of an 
Indian was not uncommon. The grandfather's family was sheltered here 
for some time in a log cabin. This was replaced in 1824 by a substantial 
brick house, which was the first in the locality, the brick for the same having 
been made on his farm by hand. The house still stands, being occupied by 
the subject and his family, and it was here that the subject's paternal grand- 
parents spent the rest of their lives, having developed a good farm from the 
woods in which they first settled. Each lived to a very old age, and here 
they reared their family, E>avid B., the father of the subject, Ijeing the young- 
est of six sons and five daughters. On this farm David B. Clutter spent his 
life, successfully carrying forward the work so auspiciously l)egun by the 
first Clutter, and he became one of the influential men of his community, al- 
though he died in early life, at the age of forty-four years, on June 5, 1855, 
leaving a widow, three sons and four daughters. The widow lived until July 
15. 1886. having reared her children in comfort and respectability. 

David P. Clutter was reared on the old homestead where he worked as 
soon as old enough, the early death of his father throwing responsibilities on 
him when but a boy. He received such education as he could in the district 
schools. He was married on April 7, 1877, to Eliza Rhine, daughter of 
Jonathan and Jerusha (Cullison) Rhine, of Clay township, where the family 
had moved a few years previously from Coshocton county, Ohio. 

Three sons and one daughter have been born to the subject and wife, 
namely: Raymond E. is married and is farming in Morgan township; 
Alfred F. is married and lives at home with his parents: Ethel married Oliver 
McMillan, of Martinsburg; Guy L., who is an electrical engineer, is single. 

Upon his marriage the subject began farming on the home place which 
he has kept well improved and well cultivated so that it has retained its old 
time fertility and strength of soil. Here he has prospered through close 
application and good management and is considered one of the progressive 
farmers of his community. He has reduced the place until he now has onlv 
one hundred and thirty-three acres of good land, on which he carries on gen- 
eral farming and stock raising, feeding all kinds of stock. 

Politically, Mr. Clutter is a Democrat, though he is not a rigid adherent 
to his party. Since reaching manhood he has been interested in public aflFairs, 
and he has served as trustee of Morgan township, also was assessor and 
treasurer for a period of ten years, in succession, proving a most capable 
and faithful public servant. He has been a frequent delegate to party con- 
ventions. He is a meml)er of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the 



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738 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Martinsburg Lodge, and he and his family belong to the Owl Creek Baptist 
church, of which he has been a member for forty-five years and a deacon for 
many years; he has always been active in church and Sunday school work, 
and has maintained the excellent reputation of his father and grandfather 
for sobriety, honesty and industry. 



GEORGE PARSOX WAGNER. 

Taught in his youth to have system in his work, to lay his plans well 
and carry them to a finish with all promptness and carefulness possible, the 
success of George Parson Wagner, farmer of Middlebury township, is not 
to be wondered at, for he has ever done his own planning and his own work, 
never depending upon others to do what he could accomplish for himself, 
and, being a man who observes things as they are and who reads extensively, 
especially along lines pertaining to his work, he tries to farm according to 
twentieth-century methods. He is the scion of a well known family, mem- 
bers of which have sought to do their full share in the work of pushing for- 
ward the car of civilization in this locality, their examples being ever whole- 
some and praiseworthy. 

Mr. Wagner was born in Middlebury township, this county, on January i, 
1851. He is the son of Henry and Sarah Anna (Jeflfries) Wagner, the father 
born in Pennsylvania in 1822, and the mother in Wayne township, Knox 
county, Ohio, in 1825. and the latter died on April 25, 191 1 The father 
came to Ohio in his youth with his parents and here was married and devoted 
his life to farming. His family consisted of six children, four of whom are liv- 
ing, namely: George P., of this review; Mrs. Sarah E. Martin; William 
Henry, farmer of Middlebury township; John L. The father of these chil- 
dren died on May 16, 1903. For a full history of the Wagner family the 
reader is referred to the sketch of William Henry Wagner, appearing on 
another page of this work. 

George P. Wagner was reared on the home farm and he received his 
education in the common schools. Early in life he took up farming and 
threshing. In 1889 he bought a farm of eighty-five acres in Middlebury 
township, which he still owns and which he has brought up to a fine state of 
cultivation and improvement and on which he carries on general farming and 
stock raising. Politically, he is a Republican, and fraternally he is a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 739 

Mr. Wagner was married on November 24, 1872, to Susan V. Lyon, 
a native of Knox county and the daughter of Isaac and Harriet (Craven) 
Lyon, a highly respected family who settled here in an early day from 
Maryland, and here Mrs. Wagner grew to womanhood and was educated in 
the common schools. Four children were born to the subject and wife, 
namely: Lewis B., Corliss H., Jennie May and Earl J. 

The wife and mother was called to her rest in November, 1890, and on 
January 7, 1892, Mr. Wagner was married to Elizabeth Ellen Pancost, a 
native of this county and the daughter of David S. and Jane (Fenk) Pan- 
cost, an excellent old family of this county, in which the father was born 
and where Mrs. Wagner grew up and attended school. This union has been 
without issue. 



GEORGE W. HYATT. 

The subject of this review, a well known citizen of Liberty township, 
Knox county, has been an important factor in agricultural circles, and his 
popularity is well deserved, as in him are embraced the characteristics of 
an unbending integrity, unabated energy and industry. He is public spirited 
and takes a deep interest in whatever tends to promote the intellectual and 
material welfare of the community honored by his residence. 

George W. Hyatt was born on March 12, 1856, in Clinton township, 
Knox county, Ohio. He is the son of Washington L. and Sarah (Hurd) 
Hyatt, the father born near Hagerstown, Maryland, February 5, 1829, and 
the mother born July 28, 1835, ^" Cornwall county, England, from which 
country she came to America when seven years old, direct to Knox county, 
Ohio, making the latter part of the trip on the canal, the ocean voyage com- 
prising seven weeks. The father was also an early settler here. He devoted 
his life to farming and became one of the substantial and highly esteemed 
men of his community. He was a soldier in the Civil war, Company A, 
One Hundred and Forty-second Regiment, Ohio National Guard, and died 
while in the anny at Point of Rocks, Virginia. His grave was located only 
two years ago at City Point, Virginia, the family having made a long search 
for it. The death of the mother occurred January 23, 1903. They were the 
parents of three children, namely : Ella, deceased ; George W. of this sketch : 
and Sildia, now the wife of E. E. Pike of Lamar, Colorado. 

George W. Hyatt grew to manhood on the home farm, and he was only 



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740 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

twelve years of age when he was compelled to go to work to help support the 
family. He remained at home until his marriage, on October lo, 1880, to 
Eldora Cramer, daughter of Michael W. and Elizabeth (Linson) Cramer. 
Two children have been bom to this union, Clyde M., who died May 14. 
1906, and Lela, who married Benton C. Horn. Mrs. Horn graduated from 
the Conservatory of Music of Otterbein University in 1908. 

Mr. Hyatt has always been a farmer and he has met with a larger success 
than falls to the lot of the average tiller of the soil who has to start out with 
nothing and depend solely upon himself. He is now the owner of one of 
the best farms in his township, which comprises three hundred and twenty 
acres of fertile, well improved and w^ell cultivated land. He formerly owned 
more land, but has sold a portion of it. He carries on general farming and 
stock raising, handling fine draft horses and sheep especially. He has a pleas- 
ant, well furnished home and good outbuildings. 

Politically, Mr. Hyatt is a Republican and he has always been interested 
in public matters. He and his family belong to the Methodist Protestant 
church and they are active in church and Sunday school aflfairs. 

Benton C. Horn, mentioned above, was born on September 27, 1882, in 
Butler tow^nship, Knox county. He is the son of Eli F. and Augusta (Mc- 
Larnan) Horn, the father a farmer now^ of North Dakota. Benton C. Horn 
was educated in the country district schools and he has been teaching for three 
years. A large part of his life has been devoted to farming and he enjoyed 
a wide reputation as a successful teacher, receiving the highest salary ever 
paid in Liberty township. During the summers he attended Wooster Uni- 
versity and taught in Liberty township, Knox county, in the w^inters, for 
three years. He was married on December 28, 1909. Politically, he is a 
Republican. He belongs to the Knights of the Golden Eagle. He is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Protestant church and is superintendent of the local 
Sunday school of this denomination. 

Mr. Horn held an agricultural exhibition and com show in his school 
the past winter for the purpose of promoting an interest in agriculture. He 
awarded prizes for the best ten ears of seed corn selected by any pupil. He 
secured the sendees of the vice-president of the Ohio Corn Improvement 
Association to make an address and to act as judge of the corn exhibit. 
This was the first aflFair of the kind ever given by any school in the county, 
and probably in the state. That Mr. Horn is interested in his work can be 
assumed when it is learned that he personally paid all the expenses of the 
exhibit. Mr. Horn devotes much of his spare time to the reading of agri- 
cultural and educational literature. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 74 1 

JOHN B. LLOYD. 

Men who love the esthetic and have eyes for the beautiful, even along 
the most commonplace stretches of the path of life, are not numerous; most 
men pass by, unnoted, flowers, sunset shadows and moonlight effects ; they 
may walk through the primeval woods and never hear a bird sing or take note 
of any of the caprices of the creatures of the wild — these have been trans- 
planted by the practical things of life in the souls of most men. But now 
and then one is to be found who devotes his life to the gratification of this 
attribute rather than plunge into the maddening scramble for the material 
things of a prosaic world. John B. Lloyd, a noted photographer of Mt. 
Vernon, is one of the most conspicuous figures of the former class of men in 
Knox county, for he has made art his hobby and loves the beautiful and ideal. 

Mr. Lloyd was bom on December 24, 1869, near Dayton, Montgomery 
county, Ohio. He was left parentless when about six months old and he 
became a ward of the Warren County Children's Home. When eight years 
of age he was taken into the family of a farmer of that locality w^here he 
worked for his board and clothes until he was sixteen years o!d. He had the 
privilege of attending school during that time, in the winter months, w^hich 
constituted his only opportunity for acquiring an education. At the age of 
sixteen he engaged with a Warren county farmer for general farm work, 
with whom he remained two years, during which time he had the privilege 
of doing extra outside work, so he took a contract to clear fifty acres of tim- 
bered land, and, being a '*husky'' lad, he worked early and late and did the 
work in a short time. He saved his money and when he was eighteen years 
old he had accumulated the sum of eight hundred dollars. He had long had 
an ambition to become a photographer and so he arranged to enter the studio 
of L. E. Kratzer of Lebanon, Ohio, and he remained with him about a year 
and a half, when he embarked in business for himself at Ripley, Brow^n 
county, Ohio, but remained there a little less than a year when he sold his 
studio and went to Madisonville. Ohio, near Cincinnati, where he was em- 
ployed in the studio of Young & Carl about three years, then followed a series 
of engagements at Lexington, Kentucky: Toledo and Loraine, Ohio; fol- 
lowing which he l>ecame connected with the photographic department of the 
National Cash Register Company at Dayton, Ohio, and he remained in this 
responsible position until early in 1909, when he came to Mt. Vernon, and 
he opened a neat, attractive and well-equipped studio at the corner of Main 
and Vine streets, which is equipped with every modern accessory known in 
the photographic art. The excellent character and rare individuality of 



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742 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Mr. Lloyd's work very soon began to attract attention and he has now 
acquired a large and rapidly growing business, his patrons coming from all 
parts of the county and surrounding towns. He has kept well to the fore in 
his line of endeavor, which art has undergone rapid and almost radical 
changes during the past decade. 

Mr. Lloyd was married on January i, 1901, to Mary Catherine Emer- 
ick, daughter of Jonathan and Rebecca (Gowger) Emerick, a prosperous 
farmer of near Germantown, Ohio. This union has been without issue. 

Mr. Lloyd is deserving of a great deal of credit for what he has 
accomplished considering his early environment, and he is essentially a self- 
made man, a fine type of that sterling class of American citizens who make 
stepping-stones of adversities and refuse to be downed by untoward cir- 
cumstances. He stands high in his profession and as a citizen, and his wife 
is a refined and cultured lady and an able assistant to Mr. Lloyd in his 
work. 



HENRY CURTIS DEVIN. 

An enumeration of the representative citizens of Knox county who have 
won recognition and success for themselves and at the same time have con- 
ferred honor upon the community would be incomplete were there failure 
to make mention of Henry Curtis Devin, who has long held worthy pres- 
tige in legal and political circles in this section of Ohio, and has always been 
distinctively a man of aflfairs, wielding a wide and potent influence among 
those with whom his lot has been cast, being one of those strong, self-reliant, 
progressive characters which are occasionally met with and who are of such 
a distinct type as to seem to be born leaders of their fellow men. Not that 
Mr. Devin courts that distinction, for he is entirely unassuming, but his 
great individuality and zeal in whatever he undertakes naturally place him 
at the head of the crowd and he has l}een a strong factor in shaping the 
destinies of the city of Mt. Vemoa and vicinity, where he has spent his life. 
Selecting the law as his sphere, early in life, Mr. Devin has devoted him- 
self principally to his profession, making himself what he is today, a thorough 
master of legal science in all its ramifications. The common law, the statutes 
of Ohio, the history, progress and growth of jurisprudence, as well as the 
higher and more abstruse principles of equity, are all completely at his com- 
mand, constituting him a leader at the ter, which position is readily conceded 
him by his associates. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 743 

Mr. Devin was born in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, on March 27, 1868, and is 
the son of Joseph C. and Ellen (Curtis) Devin. The mother was a native of 
Mt. Vernon and came of one of the distinguished families of the early days of 
the community, being the daughter of Henry B. and EHzabeth (Hogg) Curtis. 
Henry B. Curtis was of New England stock and came to Mt. Vernon in 181 7. 
and soon engaged in the practice of law, becoming the leading citizen of the 
community, and prominent in the early professional and financial affairs of 
the state. Joseph Chambers Devin, father of Henry C, of this sketch, came to 
Mt. Vernon in 1849 from his boyhood home in Seville, Medina county, this 
state, and became a law student in the office of Columbus Delano, who later 
became a national figure. Joseph C. Devin, upon being admitted to the bar, be- 
gan and always continued practice here. He formed a partnership with 
Samuel Israel and the law firm of Israel & Devin existed for many years. 
Later he formed a partnership with Henry L. Curtis, a brother-in-law. 

Joseph C. Devin was not only a prominent lawyer, but was also a leader 
in Republican politics of the county and state. He was at one time in the 
Legislature as state senator from the Mt. Vernon district, being the only 
Republican who has ever been so honored in this district, and he was chair- 
man of the Republican county committee for a number of years and he was 
very active and influential in campaign work, lx)th locally and in state affairs 
for many years. His counsel was often sought and was of weight. His 
death occurred in 1905 and that of his wife in 1907. 

Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. Devin, Henry C, of 
this review, and Elizabeth, who married William H. Pratt, of Kenilworth, 
Illinois. Both parents were members of the Episcopal church and were de- 
vout church people and numbered their friends only by the limits of their 
acquaintance. 

Henry C. Devin, of this review, was reared in Mt. Vernon and here 
attended the public schools, later Kenyon College, at Gambier, Ohio, from 
which institution he was graduated in 1888, being the third honor man in his 
class, with the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. Following this with a post- 
graduate course, he received the degree of Master of Arts from that college 
in 1893. He is a memlier of the Alpha Delta Phi college fraternity, and also 
a member of the honorary fraternity of Phi Beta Kappa. 

After his graduation Mr. Devin spent some time in travel, then took up 
the study of law in his father's office in Mt. Vernon and he was admitted to 
the bar in 1893 ^"^ ^^ immediately began the practice of his profession, form- 
ing a partnership, in 1894. with Harry D. Critchfield, as Critchfield & Devin, 
which continued until 1898. Mr. Devin then practiced alone until 1901, when 
(48) 



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744 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

he formed a partnership with Dwight E. Sapp, as Sapp & Devin, which con- 
tinued until Mr. Sapp s death, in July, 1910, since which time the subject has 
practiced alone. He was very successful from the first and has long enjoyed 
a large clientele. As a practitioner he is cautious, vigilant and indefatigable, 
contesting every point with unyielding tenacity and employing his vast store 
of legal knowledge in sustaining his positions and attacking those of his ad- 
versary. In argument he is clear, forcible, logical and convincing, his irre- 
proachable personal character and untarnished honor giving him great weight 
with juries, and his known ability and learning equally impressing the bench. 
He practices in the district, state and federal courts. 

Mr. Devin was married on July 10, 1895, ^^ Fanny E. Marsh, daughter 
of Major Fletcher E. and Mary (Eaton) Marsh. The mother died when the 
daughter was quite young. Major Marsh was a resident of Indianapolis and 
was formerly a major in the regular army. He is now living in Cincinnati. 

Two children have graced the union of the subject and wife, Fletcher M., 
born August 16, 1896, and Elizabeth Curtis, born January 29, 1900. 

Politically, Mr. Devin is a Republican and he has always been active in 
party matters, but never an office seeker, and he has never held office. He 
has served on the Republican county central committee and has l^een promi- 
nent in the councils of the party. In fraternal matters he belongs to the Ma- 
sonic order, the chapter, council and commandery, having filled all the chairs 
and has also filled the posts of presiding officer of each of the different bodies. 
He is a member of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 
He and his wife are members of the Episcopal church and Mr. Devin be- 
longs to the church vestry. 

Mr. Devin is interested in the banking business, being vice-president and 
a director in the New Knox National Bank, of Mt. Vernon, which was 
founded by his grandfather, Henry B. Curtis, and he wields no small amount 
of influence in local financial circles. He is also a large holder of town and 
county real estate, and has extensive interests in the gas and oil develop- 
ment of this section of Ohio, and is now a director of the Homer National 
Gas Company, a producing company. He is a man of large aff'airs and has 
been very successful in a business way. He was one of the organizers of the 
Mt. Vernon Telephone Company and is now a director and secretary of the 
company, much of its success having been due to his efforts and judicious 
management. He is also a director of the Utica and Homer Telephone Com- 
])any, also a director in the Sunbury and Galena Telephone Company and a 
director in the Mt. Vernon Gas Light Company and he is connected with 
various other companies of different character. He is vice-president of the 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 745 

trustees of the Mt. Vernon Public Library, having held this position since 
1897. The family, home, a commodious and beautifully furnished dwelling 
of the colonial type, is located at No. loi North Main street, being the old 
Curtis homestead where the subject's grandfather, Henry B. Curtis, spent 
the greater part of his life. This, one of the most attractive of the many 
splendid homes of Mt. Vernon, has long been noted for its hospitality and 
atmosphere of refinement, and is presided over with rare grace and dignity 
by Mrs. Devin, a lady of culture and refinement, and their home is the 
mecca of local social life. 

Mr. Devin has always taken a great interest in the advancement and 
prosperity of Knox county and endorses every movement which he believes 
will be a benefit to humanity. He is a sociable gentleman and is held in the 
highest esteem by all who know him. His achievements represent the result 
of honest endeavor along lines where mature judgment has opened the way. 
He possesses a weight of character, a native sagacity, a discriminating tact 
and a fidelity of purpose that command the respect and approval of all with 
whom he is associated. He takes first rank among the prominent men of this 
locality and is a leader in professional, financial and business, civic and social 
affairs; cosmopolitan in his tastes, broad-minded, progressive in all that the 
term implies and a fine example of that virile American manhood which com- 
mands respect and admiration in every epoch and clime. 



WILLIAM C. ROCKWELL. 

One of the best known and most successful of the younger generation 
of lawyers of Knox county is William C. Rockwell, of Mt. Vernon. Mr. 
Rockwell was born on November 9, 1873, in Miller township, Knox county, 
Ohio. He is the son of William and Catherine J. (Mack) Rockwell, the 
father a native of Washington county, Pennsylvania, and the mother of 
Geauga county, Ohio. The father was a mere lad when his parents brought 
him to the Buckeye state, probably eleven years old. Here he grew to man- 
hood, received his education in the old-fashioned schools, and here he was 
married, devoted his active life to farming and is still living at the age of 
seventy-three years, in Mt. Vernon; the mother of the subject also surv^ives. 

William C. Rockwell spent his youth until he was fourteen years of age 
in Miller township, this county, the family then moving to Mt. Vernon where 
they have since resided. He was educated in the district schools of Miller 



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746 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

township and the Mt. Vernon public schools, though his education was largely 
obtained outside the schools by personal application. Upon reaching young 
manhood he engaged in farm work by the month and when about seventeen 
years old he entered the employ of John Cooper & Company, learning the 
pattern-maker's trade; the factory finally burned down and with it his tools, 
and this seemingly untoward incident changed his course of life. He next 
engaged as a clerk in a grocery store, and began preparing himself for 
school teaching. He took up his work in the district schools of Knox count}' 
in 1898 and taught successfully for three years. While thus engaged he be- 
gan the study of law with Sapp & Devin, a well known firm of Mt. Vernon, 
and later he read with Hon. L. B. Houck and was admitted to the bar in 1903, 
having made rapid progress. In 1907 he added real estate to his business 
and this has grown to large proportions, in fact, of late, he has given most 
of his attention to it. He specializes in farm lands and has been a very ex- 
tensive dealer, his operations being confined largely to Knox county farm 
lands, of which he is an expert judge. He also handles city property. He 
has a peculiar ability in bringing together the men who want to buy farms 
and those who have them for sale. 

Mr. Rockwell has a record and a real estate business of which he may 
well feel proud, his sales running up into the hundreds of thousands of dollars 
annually. He is a diligent student of up-to-date methods, a hard worker, a 
good salesman and a strong and heavy advertiser, sparing neither time, brain 
nor money in his efforts to further his clients' interests and the establishing of 
his real estate business, which accounts for his success. 

Mr. Rockwell was married on July 8, 1903, to OIlie G. Sprindler, daugh- 
ter of Silas A. and Isabella (Watson) Sprindler, a highly respected Knox 
county family. The father is deceased and the mother lives in Mt. Vernon. 
Mr. and Mrs. Rockwell have two children, a son and a daughter, Ona Marie 
and Ivan S. 

Politically, Mr. Rockwell is a Republican and he has always been in- 
terested in public matters and kept thoroughly informed, though he has never 
held office. He is progressive in local, state and national aflfairs. and he 
believes it the duty of every good citizen to keep well advised on current 
questions, political and otherwise, and exercise the duties of citizenship ju- 
diciously and conscientiously. He and his wife are members of the Baptist 
church of Mt. Vernon and are active in church and Sunday school work. 
The family home is at No. 210 Oak street, Mt. Vernon. Mrs. Rockwell de- 
\'otes her time to her family and she is popular with a wide circle of friends, 
as is Mr. Rockwell, both being highly regarded throughout the community. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 747 

IRVING C MILLER. 

Without searching in musty tomes or the less satisfactory authority of 
tradition for lineage, it suffices to state in writing this brief sketch of a master 
of his craft that his progenitors were in the broadest sense high, their in- 
fluence salutary and whose characters and sterling worth have been repro- 
duced on their descendants. The present age is essentially commercial and 
the man of esthetic nature is the exception ; sordid dollar-getting seems to be 
paramount with most men; they could get along just as well without ever 
beholding a beautiful painting, smelling a breath of flower-scented air or read- 
ing a poem. Such men as Irving C. Miller, well known and popular photog- 
rapher of Mt. Vernon, who loves art for art's sake and who has the rare 
gift to see beauties in nature which the average man would pass by unheeded, 
are all too few. The world would be brighter, happier, better with more such 
characters, for it has been said that he who has an eye for l>eautiful things 
is never a bad man, he has no time to waste on the paltry things of earth, his 
thought is too exalted, his ideals too high. 

Mr. Miller was bom on November 30, 1869, in Dayton, Ohio. He is 
the son of David and Susan (Garber) Miller, both natives of Ohio, where 
they were feared, educated and married. The father was a carpenter and 
contractor, spending most of his life in Dayton, where he was regarded as a 
very skilled workman and successful contractor, erecting many of the city's 
substantial and attractive buildings. His death occurred about thirty-five 
years ago, his widow surviving until 1901. 

Irving C. Miller spent his childhood and youth in Dayton and attended 
the Dayton public schools, later entering the Ohio State Normal at Ada, tak- 
ing the art and literary course. He then took up the study of photography in 
the Bunker studio in Dayton. He then went to Wichita, Kansas, where he 
worked two years, and for a time in Kansas City. Returning to Ohio, he 
located in various towns, later working in a studio in New Castle, Pennsyl- 
vania, and remained there several years. In 1899 he came to Mt. Vernon, 
Ohio, and on September 15th of that year opened a studio for himself and 
here he has since remained. He gave his employers eminent satisfaction and, 
being a close observer and always a student, became exceptionally well 
equipped for his chosen life work, so that he met with success from the first 
when he established himself in this city and he now enjoys a very wide pat- 
ronage throughout the county. He has a neat, well arranged and modernly 
equipped studio for all kinds of photographic work, which is of the highest 
grade possible, all modern methods being employed that are meeting the ap- 
proval of the best photographers in the country. 



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748 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Mr. Miller was married on November 23, 1898, to Nellie Sabelia 
Flocken, daughter of Michael and Elizabeth (Rupensburger) Flocken, a 
highly esteemed family of Bucyrus, Ohio. These parents were bom in Ger- 
many, from which country they emigrated to America when young in years 
and were married here. The union of the subject and wife has been without 
issue. 

Mr. Miller's favorite form of recreation is automobiling, which both he 
and his wife greatly enjoy. They are pleasant people to meet and since com- 
ing to Mt. Vernon have won a host of friends. 



REV. LAWRENCE WILLIAM MULHANE. 

Enjoying marked prestige among the clergy of southeastern Ohio, Rev. 
Lawrence William Mulhane, the able and popular pastor of St. Vincent de 
Paul's Catholic churdi, of Mt. Vernon, Knox county, stands out a clear and 
distinct figure among the useful men of this locality. Characterized by 
breadth of w^isdom and strong individuality, his achievements but represent 
the utilization of innate talent and fidelity to duty, fearlessly advocating the 
truth and right, having accomplished much toward ameliorating the condition 
of his fellow men, often laboring with disregard for his own welfare if there- 
by he might attain the object sought — to make someone better, happier. Such 
a life is eminently deserving of emulation, being singularly free from all that 
is deteriorating or paltry, for his influence has been at all times uplifting and 
thousands of people have been made better for having known him. 

Rev. Mr. Mulhane was born on February 21, 1856, in Massachusetts. 
He is the son of Dennis and Mary Mulhane. When he was but a boy his 
parents moved to Ohio, locating at Marietta, where the family home has 
since been maintained. The subject attended the common schools until he 
w^as twelve years of age, then entered the Marietta Academy, where he pre- 
pared for Alarietta College, which he entered at the age of fourteen, being 
the youngest student ever entering the freshman clavSS of that historic in- 
stitution. In 1871, and again in 1872, he was honored by being one of the 
college public declaimers and wlien fifteen years old he received the second 
college prize for oratory. In September, 1872, he began preparation for the 
Catholic ministry. On invitation of Bishop Rosecrans, he entered St. Aloy- 
sius Seminary in Columbus, Ohio, then presided over by Father Gallagher, 
later bishop of Galveston, and here he remained four years, taking one year 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 749 

in philosophy and three in theology. In 1876 he became a member of Bishop 
Rosecrans' household, and here l^egan by private study to prepare to enter 
the famous college, Propaganda de Fide, in Rome, Italy. The death of 
Bishop Rosecrans changed his plans and, not being of proper age to enter the 
priesthood, he remained at the episcopal house, in the meantime writing for 
the Catholic Columbian until November 7, 1879, when he was ordained to 
the Catholic priesthood by the late Archbishop Purcell and was immediately 
assigned to duty as assistant rector of St. Joseph's cathedral on Broad street, 
Columbus, Ohio. The following year, 1880, when the late Bishop Watter- 
son was appointed bishop of Columbus, Father Mulhane was chosen by him 
as secretary and chancellor of the diocese, a position of great importance and 
responsibility. He held this office five years, and on October i, 1885, he was 
appointed to take charge of St. Vincent de Paul's parish at Mt. Vernon, 
Ohio. He found the finances of the parish in bad condition and at once 
began to talk of paying off the accumulated debt. This he accomplished by 
the generous aid of the parishioners in exactly seven years. On the ist of 
October, 1892, the old debt, amounting to nearly twenty thousand dollars, 
was wiped out. During this time improvements to the church costing* nearly 
three thousand dollars were also made, and he had carried on the church 
work untiringly along many lines so that it became one *of the strongest 
churches in the state, the congregation growing in numbers and the general 
work strengthened. 

The town of Mt. Vernon was founded in 1805 and four years later the 
first Catholic settled here. The first mass ever said in Mt. Vernon was cele- 
brated by Bishop Purcell, May 23, 1834, at the home of David Morton, a 
zealous adherent of the faith. The Bishop's next visit was in 1836 and mass 
was celebrated in what was known as the Banning church. Judge Anthony 
Banning, who was a Protestant minister, erected a small church on his land ; 
he was an extremely liberal man and while he held tenaciously to his religious 
views, he accorded to others the same right and when churches and even the 
court house was closed to Bishop Purcell, Judge Banning oflfered his 
church and Catholic services were held there and there the first Catholic 
sennon was preached. For many years after this mass was said in the home 
of David Morgan by the priest who occasionally visited the growing flock. 
The number of Catholic families increased steadily and priests who visited 
Danville in the eastern part of Knox county also came to Mt. Vernon until 
Father Lamy was appointed pastor of St. Luke's in Danville in the fall of 
1839, with charge of Mt. Vernon, and was urged by the bishop to begfin a 
church here as soon as possible. In July, 1842. the church at Mt. Vernon 



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750 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

was under way in charge of Father Laniy. It was a small brick structure 
and when roofed and plastered, fire broke out and destroyed ever^^thing but 
the walls, and they were damaged. In time work was resumed and on Sun- 
day, October 14, 1849, St. Vincent de Paul's church was dedicated. The pas- 
tor of the Danville church continued in charge of the Mt. Vernon church 
until September, 185 1, w^hen Rev. Julius Brent was given charge of the 
Knox county missions and here he remained until his death, nearly thirty 
years later. He was pastor of both Danville and Mt. Vernon until 1874, 
when he gave up the Danville church and devoted his remaining years to St. 
Vincent de Paul's, Mt. Vernon. In 1855 the present brick parochial residence 
was built. In 1862 an addition was made to the church and in 1872 a neat 
two-story frame parochial school was built and school opened in September. 
1873. From the death of Father Brent in 1880 until September, 1885, 
Father Lane was pastor and was then succeeded by Father Mulhane, of this 
sketch, who has faithfully and ably continued the work to the present time in 
a manner that has reflected much credit upon himself and to the eminent sat- 
isfaction of all concerned, his services here covering a period of over twenty- 
six years, he having taken charge of the parish on October i, 1885. His w^ork 
here has greatly increased the influence of the church and he has won the 
confidence and esteem of all who know him, irrespective of creed. In addi- 
tion to the material improvements he has made to the church property al- 
ready mentioned, he erected in 1890 the new school bmlding at a cost of ten 
thousand dollars, complete with all modern improvements and having an 
enrollment of more than two hundred pupils. Only recently a large addition 
was built and a high school established. There are over one thousand par- 
ishioners, nearly two hundred families and upwards of seven hundred com- 
municants. The various societies of the church are in good working order 
and Father Mulhane has the love and co-operation of his parishioners in an 
unusual degree. He is profoundly educated, having remained a student all his 
life and as a speaker he is logical, earnest, forceful and not infrequently truly 
eloquent, his powers of oratory being of a very high order. He is also a 
writer of a high order of ability, versatile, convincing and pleasing, always 
fearless in advocating what he believes to l>e right. He has been a large con- 
tributor to church and other periodicals. For many years he has made a 
study of leprosy and the work of the church in behalf of those afflicted with 
this dread scourge. In 1886 he published a book on the subject which at- 
tracted widespread attention. He has labored earnestly to induce Congress 
to establish a national home for lepers and in January, 1900, he visited Cuba 
and spent a month there, making a special study of leprosy. The result of his 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 751 

investigations was given to the world in an article in Donohiies Magazine, 
which was widely read and commended. He has also written works on the 
life of General Rosecrans, the great Union leader in the Civil war. also on 
Hon. Frank Hurd, a native of Mt. Vernon and a distinguished Ohio states- 
man. During the winter of 1910 and 191 1 Father Mulhane made a trip to 
the Pacific coast in the hope of benefiting his failing health and he furnished 
several letters covering the points of interest visited, for the local press. 

During the twenty-six years as pastor of the parish at Mt. Vernon his 
labors have been crowned with great success in every way, and because of 
this fact and partly because of his genial, obliging, unselfish and unassuming 
disposition he is revered by a vast circle of friends and acquaintances. 



LEVI S. BRADFIELD. 

Among the men of influence in Knox county, who have the interest of 
their locality at heart and who have led consistent lives, thereby gaining defi- 
nite success along their chosen lines, is Levi S. Bradfield, now engaged in the 
grain and feed business at Mt. Vernon. He has spent his life in this locality 
in which his family have loeen w^ell known since the pioneer period. 

Mr. Bradfield was born on November 13, 1849, '" Brown township, this 
county, the son of James W. ahd Sarah A. (Sapp) Bradfield, both the Brad- 
fields and the Saps being early settlers in this county, the paternal side of the 
family coming from Virginia when James W. Bradfield was a mere child, 
and the Sapps came from Pennsylvania. Members of each family have been 
prominent in the affairs of Knox county ever since they came. The father 
of the subject was a millwright in his early life, but later devoted his atten- 
tion to farming. He and his wife are both deceased. Both are buried in the 
Robinson cemetery in Union township. Eleven children were bom to them, 
of whom these five are living: Levi S., of this review: Thomas J., of Dan- 
ville, this county: Mrs Lydia Body, also of Danville; William V., of Mt. 
Liberty, this county; and Mrs. Dolly Moore, of Boston, Massachusetts. 

The son, Levi S., spent his boyhood and youth on the home farm, where 
he assisted with the general work during crop seasons and attended the neigh- 
boring schools in the winter time. When a lad he learned telegraphy and 
afterwards w^orked as an operator for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, 
on the Pittsburg & Ft. Wayne divisions, for several years, giving the com- 
pany the utmost satisfaction and being regarded by them as one of the effi- 



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752 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

cient and trusted employes. Following this he was in the mercantile business 
at Danville, Knox county, for several years, during which he enjoyed a very 
satisfactory trade; later he was in the same business at Mt. Liberty, this 
county. After spending several years at the latter place he exchanged his 
stock of goods for a farm in that locality and while conducting the same he 
continued to live in Mt. Liberty. While operating his farm he also engaged 
rather extensively in stock buying and shipping, and he continued very suc- 
cessfully in these two lines of endeavor for about fifteen years. In February. 
1908, he moved to Mt. Vernon and has since been engaged in the grain and 
feed business, having built up a very large trade which is constantly growing. 
He has been very successful in whatever he has turned his attention to and is 
now very well fixed in material things. 

Mr. Bradfield was married on June 22, 1879, to Mary E. Bennedict, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Bennedict, of Milford township, this 
county. Of the thirteen children born to Mr. and Mrs. Bennedict, only three 
are now living, Mrs. Margaret Beeny, of Milford township; Abraham S., of 
Mt. Vernon, and Mrs. Bradfield. The subject and wife have no children. 

Politically, Mr. Bradfield is a Republican, but he has never been an office 
seeker, though he is always interested in whatever concerns the general pub- 
lic. He is a member of Canterbury Lodge. Knights of Pythias, and he and 
his wife belong to the Disciples church. They stand high in the congregation 
of the same and have many true friends throughout the county. 



CHARLES D. HAYDEX. 

It is not an easy task to describe adequately a man who has led an emi- 
nently active and busy life and who has attained a position of relative dis- 
tinction in the community with which his interests are allied. But biography 
finds its most perfect justification, nevertheless, in the tracing and recording 
of such a life history. It is, then, with a full appreciation of all that is de- 
manded and of the painstaking scrutiny that must be accorded each state- 
ment, and yet with a feeling of satisfaction, that the writer essays the task 
of touching briefly upon the details of such a record as has been that of 
Charles D. Hayden, prominent attorney and business man, of Centerburg, 
who, while yet young in years, stamped the impress of his strong personality 
upon the people of Knox county and is universally recognized as one of the 
leaders of the younger members of the local bar, and, judging by his past 
record, the future must needs hold many worthy largesses for him. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 753 

Mr. Hayden was born on October 28, 1879, on a farm near Centerburg, 
Ohio, and here he has been content to spend his life, having never heeded the 
voice of the wanderlust that lures most young men from their native heaths. 
He is the son of John K. and Emma E. (Halsey) Hayden, both bom in this 
coimty, each representing sterling old pioneer families, who were influential 
here in the days of the far-stretching wilderness and who took a leading part 
in the subsequent development of the locality. The father of the subject was 
born in Hilliar township and the mother in Clinton township. The former 
spent his entire life in his native township, successfully engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits, becoming a large land owner, engaging in general farming 
and stock raising on an extensive scale. He was one of the substantial and 
influential men of southeastern Knox county, and later in life he engaged in 
banking, having been connected with the first bank established at Center- 
burg, w^hich was known as the Centerburg Bank. Later he assisted in the 
organization of the First National Bank and he was its first cashier, and at 
the time of his death he was vice-president and a director; much of the suc- 
cess and popularity of these well known institutions were due to his efforts, 
his wise foresight, sound judgment and conservative plans. The death of 
this excellent and prominent citizen occurred on May 4, 1908; his widow 
still lives in Centerburg. Politically, the elder Hayden was a Democrat and 
was long active in public affairs, his counsel being frequently sought by party 
leaders and candidates, and he held positions of public trust in a manner that 
reflected much credit upon himself and to the eminent satisfaction of all con- 
cerned. He at onetime represented Knox county in the Ohio state Legisla- 
ture, where he made his influence felt for the general good of his community 
and the party, and he filled numerous local offices, such as land appraiser, a 
member of the board of education and others. For a number of years he 
was engaged in the mercantile business in Centerburg, and was interested in 
a number of other enterprises. He was a man of progressive ideas, broad- 
minded, well informed on current topics and he did as much, if not more, for 
this vicinity than any other man. He was a w^orthy member of the Presby- 
terian church and an elder in the local church for many years and was a 
liberal supporter of the church. He was a man of unquestioned integrity, 
endeavoring to carry the Grolden Rule into his every-day life and his obliging, 
genial and gentlemanly nature made him popular with a wade circle of friends 
and admirers. 

Charles D. Hayden, of this sketch, was educated in the Centerburg pub- 
lic schools, and he was graduated from the high school there in 1897. He 
subsequently entered Dennison University at Granville, Ohio, from which he 



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754 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

was graduated in the year 1904 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He 
then entered Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tennessee, for a course in 
law, receiving a degree of Bachelor of Law with the class of 1906. His 
father's death necessitated his presence in Centerburg, and since that time he 
has been engaged in looking after his father's estate and general business 
interests. He practices law and also does a real estate business and he is 
secretary and treasurer of the Farmers Fertilizer Company, of Columbus, 
and he is a director in the Capital Limestone Company, also of that city. 
Thus he is a very busy man, and is, in every sense of the word, a worthy son 
of a worthy sire. 

Mr. Hayden is a member of the Masonic order, Bloomfield Lodge No. 
422, and also a member of Hawthorne Lodge, Knights of Pythias. He be- 
longs to the Presbyterian church, and in his political relations is a loyal sup- 
porter of the Democratic party; however, he has never been active in public 
matters, nor an office seeker, preferring to devote his attention to his large 
private affairs. 

Mr. Hayden was married December 18, 191 1, to Nancy Lillian Lewis, 
daughter of Dr. R. C. M. and Lou (Holmes) Lewis, of Marion, Ohio. 

Personally he is a young man of pleasing address and is well liked by 
all with whom he comes into contact. 



SYLVESTER ROBERT BEST, M. J). 

The medical profession in Knox county has an able exponent in Dr. 
Sylvester RoI>ert Best, of Centerburg, who while yet young in years, has 
shown what honesty of purpose, close application and unswerving energy 
can accomplish, and in every relation of life he has proved to be signally true 
to every trust. He possesses a social nature and by his genial and kindly 
attitude to those about him, has won the respect and confidence of everyone. 
He has been very successful, being known as an able and careful general phy- 
sician w^hose integrity and thoroughness are unquestioned. 

Doctor Best was bom on April 5, 1872, in Lock, Milford township, this 
county. He is the son of Sylvester and Martha (Annett) Best, both natives 
of Hilliar township, this county, and here they grew to maturity, received 
their educational training in the common schools and were married. Grand- 
father Peter Best came to this county with his family in 1839 from New Jer- 
sey. He was of Scotch descent. He settled in Hilliar township and there be- 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 755 

came a large landowner and one of the substantial and influential citizens of 
those early days. Sylvester Best, father of the Doctor, devoted his life to 
farming and became well established. He was a soldier in the Civil war, 
having enlisted on April ii, 1862, in Company F, One Hundred and Twenty- 
first Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was a corporal and he saw much hard 
service. He was wounded at Kenesaw Mountain, June 27, 1864, and perma- 
nently disabled. He has a fine record as a soldier. After the close of the 
war he studied photography and followed this for a number of years at 
various points, later returning to farming on a part of the old homestead in 
Hilliar township. He remained on the farm until a few years ago, when he 
gave up active work and is now living with his son in Centerburg. His wife 
died in August, 1909. Politically, he is a Republican and he has filled several 
local offices. He has always been a strong advocate of temperance and for 
some years affiliated with the Prohibition party. 

Dr. Sylvester R. Best spent his youth on the farm and he attended the 
country schools and was graduated from the Centerburg high school in 1892. 
Following his graduation he clerked in a store in Centerburg for about three 
years. He had taken up the study of medicine while clerking, and later he 
entered the Ohio Medical University at Columbus and was graduated from 
that institution in 1898, having made an excellent record there. He at once 
began practicing medicine at Brandon, Knox county, where he remained one 
year, then came to Centerburg and has been here ever since, having enjoyed 
a large and ever-growing practice from the first and taking a high rank among 
the medical fraternity of this locality. He has kept fully abreast of the times 
in all that pertains to his profession, being ever a student. He has paid con- 
siderable attention to surgery and has met with much success. 

Doctor Best was married on October 22, 1897, ^^ Madge Cook, daugh- 
ter of Capt. E. B. and Elizabeth (Howe) Cook, of Centerburg, where Mr. 
Cook was long prominent in business. The father of Mrs. Best served 
through the Civil war as first lieutenant of a company in the One Hundred 
and Twenty-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry and he served with distinction dur- 
ing almost the entire war. He was a successful business man and was in- 
fluential in Republican politics, holding a number of public offices. His death 
occurred in the spring of 1900, his wife having preceded him to the grave 
several years previously, when their daughter, Madge, was a child. 

Two daughters have graced the union of Doctor and Mrs. Best, Mar- 
garet Cook and EHenor R. 

Doctor Best is a member of the Knox County Medical Society and the 
Ohio Medical Association. He is a Mason, a past master, and is now secre- 



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75^ KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

tary of Bloomfield Lodge No. 422, Free and Accepted Masons. He is also a 
member of Camp No. 62, Sons of Veterans, Division of Ohio. Politically, 
he is a Republican and has been active in political matters. He has sen-ed 
on the Republican county central committee, and has been a delegate to 
county, district and state conventions, and has held various offices. He has 
served as town clerk, and in the fall of 1909 he was elected mayor of Cen- 
terburg, and has proven to be one of the best mayors the city has ever had. 
doing much for its permanent good, being a man of progressive ideas, broad- 
minded and optimistic. During his term he has acquired a water works sys- 
tem and other valuable public improvements. He was the candidate of his 
party in 19 10 as representative from Knox county to the state Legislature, 
but Knox being a Democratic county, he was defeated, though he made a 
splendid campaign and an excellent impression on the voters. He and his 
wife ar^ members of the Methodist Episcopal church and are active in church 
and Sunday school work. He is a popular and progressive citizen and stands 
high throughout the county. 



FRANK V. OWEN. 



Achieving an honorable record in the legal profession and as a public 
servant, Frank V. Owen, of Mt. Vernon, is esteemed for the many qualities 
that go to make up the inherent and finer attributes of head and heart of the 
refined gentleman. He is regarded by all classes as one of Knox county's 
enterprising, progressive, public-spirited citizens, quick to act and aid in any 
project that means prosperity and growth of the locality honored by his resi- 
dence, and cherishing a deep interest not only in material and civic aflFairs, 
but also in educational and moral matters. 

Mr. Owen is the scion of a sterling old pioneer family of this county, 
and he was bom in Middlebury township, Knox county, Ohio, in 1857. He 
is the son of Gilbert R. and Elizabeth (Green) Owen, the former being of 
New England stock, his father, Warren Owen, having come from Vermont 
to Ohio among the early pioneers, settling in what is now Middlebury town- 
ship, Knox county, when that locality was almost uninhabited and was an al- 
most interminable forest, the abode of Indians and abundant wild game of 
all kinds. Here he built a cabin and began clearing and improving a farm, 
which in due course of time ranked among the best in the township, Mr. 
Owen becoming one of the leading farmers of his time and a prominent citi- 
zen in the affairs of the county. His death occurred in Delaware county, 
this state, at the advanced age of ninety-four years. On the old family home- 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 757 

Stead in Middlebury township, this county, Gilbert R. Owen, father of Frank 
v., of this review, was bom, reared and educated and there spent his entire 
Hfe, engaged in farming, becoming well established through his industry and 
honesty, being a highly respected citizen. His death occurred in 1863, in the 
prime of young manhood, being only thirty-eight years old. His wife, Eliza- 
beth Green, was the daughter of Benjamin Green, who came to Ohio from 
Baltimore, Maryland, and he died in Perry township. Morrow county, where 
he was successfully engaged in farming. 

The son, Frank V. Owen, spent his youth on the farm, assisting in the 
ordinary duties about the place and he attended the district schools in that 
vicinity. Early in life he was seized with an ambition to become a lawyer 
and he began bending ever>' effort in that direction, finally entering the law 
office of Col. William C. Cooper & Moore as a student and he was admitted 
to the bar in 1884, since which time he has practiced at Mt. Vernon. Always 
a student, he has continually added to his knowledge of the law and has been 
very successful in the practice. His recognized ability, his diligence and 
faithfulness to every trust reposed in him have brought him a clientele of the 
highest character and he has grown to be recognized as one of the foremost 
lawyers of this section of the state. Mr. Owen is a man of intense energy 
and application. He goes into court with his case completely in hand. The 
labor of preparation is not considered. Everything depends on work and 
study — the study of men as well as books. In council he is inquisitive, exact- 
ing and exhaustive, wanting to know the truth and the facts. As an advo- 
cate he is earnest, honest and resolute, persuasive, but seldom drawing upon 
his powers of forensic oratory when the plain, straightforward facts are pref- 
erable in presenting his argument. He is industrious and untiring in his 
profession and in his duties as a public servant, and it is a rare thing to find 
him when not busy and in action. 

The domestic life of Mr. Owen began in 1894, when he was united in 
marriage with Bessie Johnson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Scott Johnson, an 
influential family of Mt. Vernon. This union has resulted in the birth of two 
children, Elizabeth and Tsabelle. By a former marriage Mr. Owen became 
the father of two sons, Charles and Robert. 

Politically, Mr. Owen is a Republican and has always stood for what is 
best in political and public life. In 1887 he was elected as Knox county's 
representative to the state Legislature and while a member was active in se- 
curing important legislation. He served on some of the most important com- 
mittees and was an active and earnest advocate of such measures as most inti- 
mately affected the interests of the people. During his term he introduced 
.'ukI secured the passage of a l)ill known as the **Owen Sunday Closing Law." 



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758 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

requiring all the saloons of the state to be closed on Sunday, which has since 
been copied by many other states. At the expiration of his term he declined 
a second nomination, preferring to devote his time and talents to his pro- 
fession and he has since declined all political preferment. His career in the 
House stamped him as a man of keen civic insight, rare ability and public 
spirit and won the hearty approval of his constituents. 

Fraternally, Mr. Owen is a member of the Knights of Pythias. He is 
a man of recognized ability and professional attainments, is a companionable 
and congenial gentleman and universally popular. 



GEORGE \V. McNABB. 

That the plenitude of satiety is seldom attained in the affairs of life is 
to be considered a most beneficial deprivation, for where ambition is satisfied 
and every ultimate end realized, if such be possible, apathy must follow. Ef- 
fort would cease, accomplishment be prostrate and creative talent waste its 
energies in inactivity. The men who have pushed forward the wheels of 
progress have been those to whom satisfaction lies ever in the future, who 
have labored continuously, always finding in each transition stage an incen- 
tive for further effort. Such a man is George \V. McNabb, well known citi- 
zen of Mt. Vernon, whose well directed efforts have gained for him a position 
of desired prominence in the commercial circles of Knox county and his 
energy and enterprise have been crowned by success. 

Mr. McNabb was born on November 25, 1867, on a farm in Bedford 
township, Coshocton county, Ohio. He is the son of John and Susan 
(Adams) McNabb, the father born in Harrison county, Ohio, and the mother 
in Coshocton county, this state. John McNabb came to Coshocton county 
when young and there engaged in farming, stock buying and shipping, also 
bought and shipped wool on an extensive scale. In 1880 the family moved 
to Howard, Knox county, where the father engaged in the hotel and livery 
business until 1893, when he moved to Mt. Vernon, continuing the liverv 
business here. His death occurred in 1905, his wife having preceded him to 
the grave in August, 1897. They were the parents of six sons and three 
daughters, all living but two sons. 

George W. McNabb was educated in the public schools of Coshocton 
county, and when the family moved to Knox county he began clerking in the 
store of W. H. Ralston, of Howard, at the age of fifteen years, remaining 
there for six years, during which time he mastered the ins and outs of mer- 
chandising, then bought the business of his employer and continued general 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 759 

merchandising until 1896, having built up a large patronage through his 
close application, tact and honest dealings. Then, seeking a larger field for 
his operations, he moved to Columbus. 

While living in Howard, Knox county, Mr. McNabb was married on 
June 6, 1889, to Lydia Tracy, daughter of Joshua and Mary (Rightineyer) 
Tracy, of Knox county, and to this union two children have been bom, 
Helen, who is living at home, and Dwight T., also at home and a student in 
high school; the daughter is a talented musician. 

On moving to Columbus, Mr. McNabb engaged in the grocery business 
for three years and for the three succeeding years he was secretary and treas- 
urer of the Columbus Sporting Goods Company. Although his career in the 
capital city had been successful in a business way, he returned to Knox county 
in 1903 and opened a retail grocery business in Mt. Vernon, in which he has 
continued to the present time with ever-increasing success, his trade covering 
a large territory and constantly branching out to new fields. He always car- 
ries a large, up-to-date and carefully selected stock of staple and fancy gro- 
ceries and he has a well arranged store building, his present location being at 
No. 139 Main street. In the spring of 191 1 he also opened a grocery store 
at Gambier, which has been a most successful business venture. He has won 
a position in the front rank of enterprising and progressive business men of 
this locality and proven himself to be a man of rare acumen, foresight and 
sound judgment. 

Mr. McNabb is a member of the Business Men's Association and is 
active in promoting the best interests of the community. He is a loyal Re- 
publican and while always interested in public matters has never been an office 
seeker. He is a member of the Masonic order and the chapter of Mt. Ver- 
non ; also belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Lodge No. 
140. He and his family are members of the Christian church, he being a 
deacon in the same and is also treasurer of the local congregation and active 
in church aflfairs. The family home is at No. 201 East Vine street, Mt. 
Vernon, and the family is prominent in social aflfairs. 



WILLIAM H. MAY. 



The record of William H. May, well known and progressive lumber 
dealer and mill man of Mt. Vernon, Knox county, is that of a man who 
has, by his own perseverance and indomitable energy worked his way 
from a modest beginning to a place of influence and comparative afifluence, 

(49) 



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760 KNOX COTNTY, OHIO. 

his life having been one of strenuous, straightforward endeavor and the 
notably systematic and honorable methods he has employed have won him 
the unbounded confidence and regard of those with whom h^ has come 
into contact. Mr. May has taken an intelligent interest in the welfare of 
the community and gives his unreserved support to every movement that 
promises to benefit the community along moral, educational or material 
lines. Genial and courteous in his relations with his fellow men, he en- 
joys a large circle of warm friends who esteem him for his personal 
worth. 

Mr. May was born Xoveml)er 23, 1859, in Easton, Northampton county, 
Pennsylvania, and he is the son of John and Margaret ( Raflferty) May. The 
father was born in England and he emigrated to America with his parents 
when a child and settled in Pennsylvania. The Rafferty family came from 
Ireland. At the breaking out of the Civil war the father enlisted in a Pennsyl- 
vania regiment and served through the war, being promoted to the rank of 
captain for meritorious service. Just prior to the surrender of Lee at Appo- 
mattox, Captain May's company was fired on from ambush and he and one 
of his men were killed. During his absence in the army his family moved 
from their home in Pennsylvania to Sandusky county, Ohio, and located on 
a farm, and there William H. May, of this review, grew to manhood and be- 
came familiar with farm work during the crop season, attending the district 
schools in the winter time. When about twenty-two years of age he engaged 
in the lumber business and he furnished large consignments of railroad ties 
to various companies under contract and soon had a good start. Later he 
added a saw mill to his equipment and for many years was extensively en- 
gaged in the timber and lumber business in Sandusky, Putnam and Paulding 
counties. In the spring of 1900 he came to Mt. Vernon and engaged in the 
same business on an extensive scale and met with pronounced success from the 
start. A few years later he established a saw and planing mill at the foot of 
Front street on the Baltimore & Ohio railroad and from that time to the 
present he has been extensively engaged in the lumber business, supplying 
many of the principal lumber-consuming cities and he is widely known as 
a lumberman. He is a man of excellent business ability and of keen discern- 
ment, making few mistakes and his straightforward methods have won for 
him the confidence and good will of all who know him. 

Mr. May was married on December 19, 1889, to Mira Spitler, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. William Spitler, of Hancock county, Ohio. This union has 
been without issue. 

Mr. May is a Democrat in politics, but not active in party affairs, hav- 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 761 

ing never been an office seeker, though he is interested and well informed 
on public matters. Fraternally, he belongs to the Masonic order and the 
Knights Templar commandery of this order; he has attained the thirty- 
second degree and belongs to the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine. He is prominent in Masonic circles and he is a worthy ex- 
ponent of its sublime principles, as his daily life would clearly indicate. He 
is the type of business man that makes a community thrive and he is popu- 
lar with all classes of citizens. Considering his discouraging environment 

in early life, and the fact that he has been compelled to go it alone, he has 
« 

been successful beyond the average business man. 



WILLIAM J. WELSH. 

The most elaborate history is perforce merciless abridgment, the his- 
torian being obliged to select his facts and materials from manifold details 
and to marshal them in concise and logical order. This applies to specific as 
wtII as general history, and in the former category is included the interesting 
and important department of biography. In every life of honor and useful- 
ness there is no dearth of interesting situations and incidents, and yet in sum- 
ming up such a career the writer must needs touch on the more salient facts, 
giving the keynote of the character and eliminating all that is superfluous to 
the continuity of the narrative. William J. Welsh, well known and success- 
ful insurance and real estate dealer in Mt. Vernon, Knox county, has led an 
active and eminently useful life, the more important facts of which have been 
so identified with the useful and practical that it is to them that the reader's 
attention is for the most part directed. 

Mr. Welsh was born on June i, 1868, in Fredericktown, Knox county, 
Ohio, and he is the son of Peter and Catherine (O'Connor) Welsh, both 
natives of Ireland, from which they emigrated to America when young and 
married in the United States; they are now deceased. Soon after the birth 
of the subject, the family moved to Mt. Vernon and here William J. was 
educated in the city schools, where he applied himself well and received a 
good text-book training. While yet a mere boy he turned his attention to the 
insurance business, which has constituted his chief life work, and as early as 
1884 he became associated with the Peterman agency, whose interests he 
looked after in this locality in a most satisfactory and successful manner 
until 1903, in which year he engaged in the con feet ioner\' business, in con- 



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762 KNOX COUNTY, DHIO. 

nection with which he maintained a news stand, operating these until 1907. 
having built up an extensive patronage in both. Upon the last mentioned 
date he returned to the insurance business and established a general agency 
for himself, handling a general line of insurance, which has grown to con- 
siderable proportions and is still on the increase through his able and judi- 
cious management. 

Fraternally, Mr. Welsh is a member of Mt. Vernon Lodge No. 140, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; of the Kokosing Aerie No. 760, 
Fraternal Order of Eagles, and Hiawatha Lodge No. 824, Royal Order 
of Moose. Politically, he is a Republican, and while he is not a politician 
and does not take a very active part in the affairs of his party, yet he is 
always ready to support any movement looking to the furtherance of the 
public welfare. He is a worthy upholder of the Catholic faith. He is a 
notary public and does a great deal of business as such. 

Mr. Welsh has reitiained unmarried. Being a man of straightforward 
business principles and of upright character and genial manners, he is a 
good mixer and has numerous friends throughout the country. 



GEORGE H. HEARD, M. D. 

A name known to every household in Mt. Vernon and Knox county is 
Dr. George H. Heard, who has long stood at the head of the medical fra- 
ternity in this and adjoining counties, at least his reputation as a general 
practitioner is second to none. He has done much for the later-day devel- 
opment of this locality where he has ever had the confidence and good will 
of all classes owing to his public spirit, his high sense of honor and his 
success in the alleviation of *'the thousand ills to which flesh is heir.'* Thus 
he is entitled to commendation for many reasons, not the least of which is 
the fact that when the tocsin of war sounded during the dark days of the 
sixties he readily responded and served his country well in defense of the 
flag. 

Doctor Heard was born May 23, 1844, ^^ Dublin, Franklin county, Ohio, 
and he is the son of Thomas and Sarah (Haynes) Heard. The father was 
a native of Devonshire, England, from which country he came to America 
when twenty-four years old and settled at Chillicothe, Ross county, Ohio. 
Grandfather George Haynes was a millwright and built the first grist mill 
erected on Paint creek, near Chillicothe ; he was also a blacksmith, and a man 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 763 

of rugged constitution and sterling character. His death occurred in 185 1 
at the remarkable age of ninety-nine years; his widow, who survived until 
1878, reached the age of ninety-seven. Thomas Heard, father of the subject, 
was a physician and practiced in Chillicothe, Ohio, for many years. He 
was also a minister and became pastor of the Methodist church in Dublin, 
Franklin county, this state, which church edifice is still standing. He later 
moved to Columbus where he lived many years and where his death occurred 
in 1898, his wife having preceded him to the grave in 1851, nearly a half 
century. 

Dr. George H. Heard was the second child of a family of five children. 
He obtained his early education in the public schools of Columbus. In 
1862 he enlisted in Company A, Eighty-eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, serv- 
ing three months, at the expiration of which he re-enlisted for three years in 
the Twenty-second Battery, Ohio Light Artillery, and served with distinction 
until the close of the war. He was taken prisoner at Strawberry Plains, Vir- 
ginia, in June, 1864, and was sent to prison at Salisbury, North Carolina, for 
five weeks, when he was released and rejoined his battery, remaining with 
it until the close of hostilities. After the close of the war he entered the 
Ohio Wesleyan University at Delaware, Ohio, where he remained two years, 
then he taught school a year in Franklin county, after which he entered Star- 
ling Medical College at Columbus and remained there a term. When his father 
removed from that city to Richmond, Indiana, he continued his medical 
studies under his father, but later returned to the Starling Medical College, 
from which he was graduated in 1870 and began the practice of his pro- 
fession at Hillsboro, Indiana, where he remained two years, then moved to 
Richmond, Indiana, where he practiced successfully for nine years. Locat- 
ing in Lafayette, Indiana, he remained there two years, thence moved to Knox- 
ville, Tennessee, with his father, where they practiced two years. He then 
came to Chillicothe, Ohio, in 188 1, where he was married to Jane Cryder, 
daughter of Jacob Cryder, of Hopetown, Ross county, this state. Dr. Heard 
practiced at Chillicothe for five years. From there he came to Mt. Vernon 
in 1888 and has continued in the practice from that time to the present, 
having built up a very large and lucrative clientage and his name has long 
since become a household word in this locality. He has kept well to the fore 
on all matters pertaining to materia medica and holds a high place among his 
professional brethren. 

Two children have been bom to the Doctor and wife, a son and daughter. 
Eugene is a surgeon in Salt Lake City, Utah, and Ada is now Mrs. Edward 
Thompson, of Richmond, Indiana. They were given excellent educational 
advantages. 



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764 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Doctor Heard was married October 12, 1892, to Daisy Lane, of Mt. 
Vernon, daughter of John and Mary (Senior) Lane. 

Politically, Dr. Heard is a Republican, but is not active in the party. He 
is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and of Joe Hooker 
Post No. 21, Grand Army of the Republic, and he has been surgeon of the 
post for eight years. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church, Mrs. Heard being active in church work. They have a home here, 
but have been accustomed to spend the winters in the South for some time 
in order to avoid the rigors of a northern climate. 



LAWRENCE C. PENN. 

The enterprising citizen whose name heads this article needs no intro- 
duction to the people of Knox county. He has been for some time prom- 
inently identified with the mercantile and industrial interests of the community 
where he resides and always manifesting an active interest in the public wel- 
fare. The life of Lawrence C. Penn having resulted in success in material 
things and in much good to his fellow men, therefore is worthy of emulation 
by the youth whose fortunes are yet matters for future years to determine. 

Mr. Penn was born on June 10, 1863, near Darlington, Richland county, 
Ohio. He is the scion of a sterling old Buckeye family, the son of Ezekiel 
and Sarah J. (Winand) Penn, both having been born in the same vicinity as 
was their son, Lawrence C. The father devoted his early life to farming, 
later engaging in the farm implement business in Mt. Gilead, Morrow county ; 
later the family moved to Mt. Vernon, where the father was foremost 
in promoting the Mt. Vernon Sanitarium and became its manager. 
Here he became well known and prominent; he and his wife are now living 
retired in this city. 

The son. Lawrence C, s[)ent his boyhood on the home farm, and in 
the winter months attended the district schools. When sixteen years of age 
he moved with the family to Mt. Gilead and there he attended the high school. 
He had also attended the high school at Belleville. During this time he was 
also studying music, for which he had a great fondness and aptness. After 
one year at Mt. Gilead he beg^n teaching music, giving private lessons on 
the piano at Mt. Gilead and in that vicinity, continuing his musical studies 
at Delaware, Ohio, under such eminent instructors as Carrie Laramore and 
Professor Thomas, both regarded as instructors of a very high order and 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 765 

ability. He continued teaching for ten years and keeping up his study of music 
the meanwhile, being for a time under Prof. Hans Von Schiller, of Columbus, 
the celebrated German instructor, now head of the piano department of the 
Chicago College of Music. After coming to Mt. Vemon in 1892, Mr. Penn 
continued teaching for three years. About this time he opened a store here for 
the sale of all kinds of musical merchandise. Although his services were in 
great demand as a teacher and he was meeting with exceptional success in 
this vocation, he gave up teaching to devote all his attention to his rapidly 
growing business interests, which has now reached extensive proportions, his 
numerous patrons coming from all parts of Knox and surrounding counties. 
He employs a number of experienced and courteous salesmen in connection 
with his Mt. Vernon establishment. He also maintains a store at Delaware, 
Ohio, under his direct supervision with a local man in charge. He carries a 
full, complete and carefully selected stock of all kinds of instruments in both 
stores, everything in the musical line, pianos of the l>est high grade make, 
pianolas, organs, phonographs, in fact, every kind of musical instrument, 
sheet music and musical supplies. He also maintains in connection with his 
Mt. Vernon establishment a well stocked jewelry department, where every- 
thing in the jewelry line, cut glass, watches and clocks are carried ; in connec- 
tion with this is also a first-class repair and engraving department. In addi- 
tion to these interests, Mr. Penn has various other important interests. He 
is proprietor and manager of Thistle Ridge Hospital and Sanitarium at Mt. 
Vernon, which is both a general and emergency hospital ; he is secretary and 
treasurer of the Mt. Vernon Coal and Ice Company; he is president of the 
Hiawatha Park Association, a beautiful pleasure and recreation park near 
Mt. Vemon. He gives all of these his close attention, but having his busi- 
ness under a splendid system, he manages with ease these important aflfairs 
which would no doubt give others of less business calibre and acumen no lit- 
tle amount of laborious labor and trouble. He is a man of rare business ability 
and foresight, a bom organizer and promoter and whatever he turns his at- 
tention to is a success. 

Always interested in the general upbuilding of Mt. Vernon, he has 
ever stood ready to do his full share in promoting its general interests, along 
both material and civic lines. He is now serving his third consecutive term 
as president of the Mt. Vemon Citizens' Association, the purpose of which 
organization is to devise ways and means for the betterment and material 
progress of Mt. Vernon and Knox county. 

Mr. Penn was married to Frances Frost, daughter of Mr. arkl Mrs, 
Munson Frost, of Xevv York, a lady of.ta!ent and refinement. This union 



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766 ' KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

has been graced by the birth of one daughter, Helen Cynthia. Mrs. Penn is 
an accomplished musician, both vocal and instrumental. 

Politically, Mr. Penn is an independent Democrat. He is past comman- 
der of the Sons of Veterans, local camp, being entitled to membership in 
view of the fact that his father was a member of Company C, Seventy-second 
Ohio Volunteer Infantr}% during the Civil war. He and his family are mem- 
bers of the Seventh-Day Adventist church, and they stand high in the best 
social circles of the city. 



HUGH NEAL. 



Early in life Hugh Neal, prominent professional and business man of 
Mt. Vernon, realized the fact that success never smiles upon the idler or 
dreamer and he has accordingly followed such an aphorism, devoting his 
life to ardent toil along lines that cannot but insure success. The popularity 
and prosperity which he enjoys has been the result of energy rightly applied 
and have been won by commendable qualities. 

Mr. Neal was born on November 15, 1854, in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, and 
here he has been content to spend his life, wisely deciding that better oppor- 
tunities existed for him right here at home than elsewhere. He is the son 
of Hugh and Ruth (Jackson) Neal, and a brother of George D. Neal, an 
excellent Knox county family, a complete sketch of whom appears elsewhere 
in this volume. 

The son, Hugh Neal, attended the public schools in his native town and 
later the normal school at Danville, this count>\ After leaving school he 
engaged in the carriage business with his brother George, for a time, read- 
ing law in the meantime with Col. W. C. Cooper and was admitted to the 
bar in June, 1885, soon afterwards opening a office for practice in his home 
town and was making a good start when his practice was interfered with 
by his friends electing him clerk of the courts of Knox county, in 1886, the 
duties of which he discharged in such an able and conscientious manner that 
he was re-elected in i88g, and he received the benefit of the extension of the 
official term, serving six years and a half. After leaving this office he re- 
sumed the practice of law, becoming associated with William McElroy, and he 
has since been successfully engaged in the practice of his profession, being 
regarded as among the leading members of the Knox county bar and figuring 
prominently in the local courts, being an ardent, straightforward, vigilant 
and capable advocate and very successful in the trial of cases. He has always 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 767 

been a profound student and has kept abreast of the times not only in what- 
ever pertains to his profession, but in all current matters of civic, political, 
scientific and literary import. He practices in the district and state courts 
as well as those of the county. 

When the oil and gas development began in Knox county Mr. Neal soon 
became active in this field and he has been most successful in the same, his 
operations extending to Wayne, Ashland, Richland and Coshocton counties 
in addition to Knox county. 

Politically, Mr. Neal is an old-line Democrat and has ever stood ready 
to defend the principles of his party, being active and influential in the ranks 
for many years. When a young man he was a member of the county com- 
mittee and was frequently a delegate to county, district and state conven- 
tions where he always did effective work for the good of the party and the 
people he represented. 

Mr. Neal was married in December, 1875, to Eva Beum, daughter of 
Isaac T. and Matilda (Robinson) Beum, a highly honored Knox county 
family, and this union has resulted in the birth of four children, namely : 
Jennie R. married Burges E. Sapp, an attorney of Mt. Vernon; Georgia is in 
business in Kalamazoo, Michigan ; Clinton married and is living in Colum- 
bus, Ohio ; Edith is at home. 

Mr. Neal is a member of the Masonic order, having attained the Knight 
Templar degree ; also the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks. He has filled all the offices in the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and has been a delegate to the grand lodge; 
and has also filled most of the chairs in the other lodges to which he l)elongs. 
He has a neat office, wxll equipped with law books, at No. 130 South Main 
street, and his pleasant residence is at No. 906 West High street. 



SAMUEL FLACK. 



The life of Samuel Flack, well known farmer of Butler township, Knox 
county, has been that of the average man — of sunshine and shadow, victory 
and defeat, toil and respite, failure and success, but withal a commendable 
and satisfactory' one, and now that the harvest time is over and the autumn 
winds have come, he finds himself very comfortably situated and can take a 
retrospective glance over the backward-leading way and, seeing nothing of 
which he might be ashamed, for he has always been a man of upright prin- 
ciples and has done his duty as he has seen and understood the right. 



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768 KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 

Mr. Flack was born in Prairie township, Holmes county, Ohio, August 
7, 1834 He is the son of James and Jennie (Grant) Flack. The maternal 
grandparents, Jonathan and Sarah (Kelley) Grant, were natives of Beaver 
county, Pennsylvania, and they came to Ohio in a very early day, and in 
1809 built the first cabin in Prairie township, Holmes county, w^hen this 
country was a wilderness and the haunt of Indians and wild beasts. The 
grandfather cleared a **patch'' and then fell ill, as so many of the newcomers 
to a wild coimtry did, and for twenty-eight days lived by roots and barks, 
provided by his son. When about to die, an Indian buck happened along and 
directed them to the family of a **pale-face'* on the Killbuck river, and 
there the son found Jonathan Butler, who, with his father-in-law, had 
reached the place the day previously, and subsequently the two families be- 
came very friendly, and as Grant could speak the Indian language he acted 
as **outlook" for surveyors who were surveying the "new^ purchase." He 
was a mighty hunter and many deeds of prowess are told of him. He re- 
turned to Pennsylvania the winter after his arrival here, and in April, 1810, 
brought his family to his new home ; and, prospering through hard work, he 
made a good home here and in it spent the balance of his life. He was a 
veteran of the Revolutionary w^ar, and for many years was a spy among the 
Indians of the early times. His family was a large one, and the mother of 
the subject had the distinction of being the first white girl born in Holmes 
county. 

Samuel Flack, the paternal grandfather of the subject," came from West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, to Holmes county, Ohio, in 181 2. His wife, 
Betsy Smith, was of Irish descent. Their family consisted of nine children, 
namely : Robert, Jennie, James, Richard, Ibbie, Mary, Samuel, Thomas and 
William. After the death of his first wife, Betsy Smith, Mr. Flack married 
a Mrs. Beaver, a widow with two children, and to his second union five chil- 
dren were born. 

James Flack, father of the subject, married Jennie Grant. He lived to 
be seventy-two years old, having devoted his life to farming, finally owning 
a good home. His family consisted' of nine children. Politically, he was a 
Democrat, and he and his family Ijelonged to the Disciples church. 

Samuel Flack, of this sketch, grew up on the homestead in Holmes 
county and received such education as he could in the pioneer log cabin 
schools, and early in life took up farming for a livelihood, in connection with 
which he worked at the broom-maker's trade. He moved to Knox county 
about 1863, locating on a farm in Butler township, one mile north of his 
present home, then for ten years rented where he now lives, then bought land 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 769 

in Liberty township, on which he lived for seven years, returning to Butler 
township about 1881 and bought the Lepley homestead, a farm of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres, and here he has since resided, keeping the place well 
improved and under a fine state of cultivation, carrying on general farming 
and stock raising successfully. ' This farm was entered from the government 
by Jacob Lepley, it now consisting of about nine hundred acres in Butler 
township, one of the best farms in the county. 

Politically, Mr. Flack is a Democrat and he belongs to the Grange, and 
he has always taken the interest of a fair-minded citizen in public affairs. 

Mr. Flack was married in i860 to Elizabeth Lepley, daughter of Jacob 
and Margaret (Hoyman) Lepley, a complete sketch of whom is to be found 
on another page of this work. Five children have been bom to Mr. and Mrs. 
Samuel Flack, namely: Jacob, born August 29, 1861 ; Sylvia Ellen, born 
March 17, 1864; Philip W., born July 13, 1866, married, in 1904, Georgina 
Babcock, and they have four children, James C, J. Paul, Elizabeth Ann and 
Sylvia Ruth; Joseph L. was born on September 12, 1870; Dessie R. was born 
April 22, 1878. Two sons and two daughters live at home, all constituting 
a happy and congenial family. 

Personally, Mr. Flack is a very pleasant gentleman, hospitable, obliging 
and he and his family have always stood high in the social life of this part of 
the county. 



JOHN E. STONEBROOK. 

•In such men as John E. Stonebrook, the present able and popular treasurer 
of Knox county, there is peculiar satisfaction in offering in their life histories 
justification for the compilation of works of this character — not that their 
lives have been such as to gain them particularly wide notoriety or the admir- 
ing plaudits of men, but that they have been true to the trusts reposed in them, 
having shown such attributes of character as entitled them to the regard to all. 

Mr. Stonebrook is the representative of one of the honored old families 
of Knox county, where he has been content to spend his life, laboring in such 
a manner as to bring success to himself and good to the community in general. 
He was born in Brown township, this county, on July 28, 1867, and he is the 
son of Mathias and Mariah (Hagerman) Stonebrook, both natives of Car- 
roll county, Ohio, from which they came to Knox county in the early fifties. 
The father was a successful farmer; he and his wife are both deceased, 
John E. Stonebrook, of this review, being the only member of the family now 
living. He was reared on the home farm where he labored during the crop 



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7/0 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

seasons when a boy, attending the district schools, during the winter months, 
later attending a normal school for a short time. He prepared himself for a 
teacher and followed that profession with singular success for several years 
and later engaged in various pursuits. Being a young man of studious and 
inquisitive habits, courageous and fostering proper ideals, he continued to 
press forward in the face of obstacles until he has been appropriately rew^arded. 
He finally became connected with the C. & G. Cooper Company, of Mt. Vernon, 
in the capacity of timekeeper and he remained in the employ of this company 
until the fall of igo8, rendering most efficient ser\^ice. In the year mentioned 
he was elected treasurer of Knox county, and he gave such high-grade and 
satisfactory service that his constituents gladly returned him to the same office 
in the fall of 1910 and he entered upon his second term in September, 191 1. 
He gives his individual attention to the affairs of the office and the consen- 
sus of opinion is that the county has never had a better treasurer. He has 
always been a loyal Republican and ever since he was a young man he has 
been deeply interested in public affairs. For some time he represented 
Brown township, his home community, upon the Republican county central 
committee. 

Mr. Stonebrook is a man of splendid characteristics and business quali- 
fications and has proven himself to l>e a painstaking and popular public 
official. His influence in the community is always for the betterment of 
conditions and the uplift of the people. 

On June 12, 1902, Mr. Stonebrook was united in marriage with Sarah 
Beck, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Beck, of Holmes county, Ohio, and 
this union has resulted in the birth of four children, two sons and two 
daughters, Kenneth, Mary, Albert and Ruth. 

Fraternally, Mr. Stonebrook is a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias. Religiously, he is a memljer 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, while his wife belongs to the German 
Evangelical Lutheran church. 



JACOB LEPLEY. 



One of the well known and highly revered pioneers of this section of 
the Buckeye state who is eminently entitled to a place in his country's history 
w^as Jacob Lepley, long since departed to that "undiscovered bourne from 
whence no traveler e'er returns." He is remembered as a man of many 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 771 

sterling attributes of head and heart, courageous, loyal to the right as he saw 
and understood the right, a persistent worker and a man of public spirit. He 
lived in an epoch that tried men*s souls and tested their mettle, and he was 
not found wanting in the performance of his innumerable tasks. He was a 
fine type of those men who redeemed the fertile farms of today from the 
wilderness and made possible the pleasant homes of the present generation. 

Mr. Lepley was born .in Pennsylvania on June 7, 1801, and there he 
grew to manhood, his early life not differing materially from that of 'other 
pioneer children. Upon reaching manhood he married Margaret Hoyman, 
who was also born in Pennsylvania on April 17, 1801. They left Somerset 
county, that state, in 1825 and came to Knox county, Ohio, locating on a 
farm in Butler township, and there by hard work developed a farm on which 
they spent the balance of their lives, his death occurring on October 15, 1882, 
and the mother on May 5, 1878. In connection with farming, he also fol- 
lowed carpentering. He entered a quarter section of land here, thus found- 
ing the Lepley homestead. Hunting and fishing were his recreations, and he 
delighted in each, being a successful sportsman, in the days when game was 
abundant. Politically, he was a Jeffersonian, Jacksonian Democrat and loyal 
to his convictions. His wife was a great worker in the church, the field and 
the home. She wove and spun their own clothing for her family. They 
were Lutherans. 

To Jacob Lepley and wife ten children were born, named as follows: 
Caroline, born March 31, 1824, died March 29, 1891 ; Valentine, bom Janu- 
ary 22, 1826, lives in Hardin county, Iowa; Polly, born September 12, 1827, 
died September 15, 1828; William, born July 6, 1829, died June 14, 1903: 
George, born January 26. 1831, died March 20, 1902; Susanna, born April 
25, 1833, died February 25, 1905; Adam, born April 16, 1835, ^^^^ Novem- 
ber 10, 1908, in Hardin county, Iowa; Philip, born April 11, 1837, died 
October 22, 1909, in Yolo county, California; Elizabeth, October 5, 1839; 
Nancy, October 16, 1841. 

Tradition says that Adam Lepley, Sr., was the first of the Lepleys to 
come to America; and that he emigrated from Wurtemberg, Germany, and 
settled in Pennsylvania, later moving to Ohio, where he spent the balance of 
his days, being an early pioneer here, and he and his wife are both buried in 
the Lepley cemetery in Knox county. He was born on February 6, 1755, 
and died on August 26, 1831 ; his wife was born on March 22. 1755, and her 
death occurred on April 11, 1842. They had several children, of whom 
Adam Lepley, Jr., was one, and he was the father of Jacob Lepley, subject 
of this sketch. 



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yyz KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

LEANDER CAYWOOD. 

The march of improvement is accelerated day by day, and each suc- 
cessive moment seems to demand of men a broader intelligence and greater 
discernment than did the preceding, showing that successful men must be 
live men in this age, bristling with activity. The purpose of biography is to 
preserve the records of such men for the edification of succeeding genera- 
tions; thus the lessons of biography may be far-reaching to an extent not 
superficially evident. A man's reputation is the property of the world, for 
the laws of nature have forbidden isolation. Every human being either sub- 
mits to the controlling influence of others or wields an influence which 
touches, controls, guides or misdirects others. If he be honest and successful 
in his chosen field of endeavor, investigation will brighten his fame and point 
the way along which others may follow with like success. Consequently, it 
is believed that a critical study of the life record of Leander Cay wood, one 
of the substantial and prominent citizens of Knox county, long a leading agri- 
culturist and stock man, now^ living in the city of Fredericktown, will benefit 
the readers of this history, for it has been one of large success, usefulness 
and honor. 

Mr. Caywood is a worthy representative of one of the sterling old 
pioneer families of Knox county, and here he has been content to spend his 
life, his birth having occurred in Middlebury township on January 9, 1844, 
on a farm. He is the son of John and Sarah (Murphy) Caywood. William 
Caywood, paternal grandfather of the subject, came from New Jersey in 
1812 and settled in Middlebury township, this county, when this part of the 
state, indeed most of the state, was yet a wilderness and the home of the red 
man and wild beast. He entered a section of land from the government, 
and here he resided until his death, a few years later, in 1816. He was 
buried in the Friends cemetery, near the Owl Creek church, now^ fallen to 
decay. Many of the pioneer settlers were buried here. The elder Caywood's 
wife died in New Jersey and he brought with him his three sons, Will- 
iam, David and John. The hostility of the Indians caused him to return the 
sons to the home of their grandfather in New Jersey, with whom John re- 
mained until 1830. The other two sons returned to Knox county, Ohio, and 
took charge of their father's estate about the time of his death. David was 
killed by a falling tree and William remained in the community; neither 
ever married. 

John Caywood, father of the immediate subject of this sketch, was 
married in Middlebury township, this county, to Sarah Murphy, a native of 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. jy^^ 

the township and a daughter of William Muq^hy, who came to Knox county 
from Pennsylvania in early pioneer days. Mr. and Mrs. Caywood began 
their married life on a farm purchased by his father in 1812, and there they 
established a good home, in which they spent the balance of their lives, both 
dying at the age of seventy-two years. Early in life Mr. Caywood was a 
Whig in his political belief, and later he voted the Republican ticket, at the 
birth of the party. To these parents thirteen children were born, nine of 
whom reached maturity and five are yet living, namely: Lcander, of this 
sketch; Alfred, of Trinidad, Colorado; Lewis D., of Fredericktown ; Lavilla 
married Zachariah Zedaker and they live on part of the old home farm in 
Middlebury township; Luella married C. J. Mann and they also live on a 
part of the old homestead. Three of the Caywood brothers were soldiers in 
the Civil war, Abner, Sylvester and Leander, the latter being the only one of 
the three now living. 

The subject of this sketch was the sixth child in order of birth and he 
grew to manhood on the home farm, and when but a boy he began the hard 
labor of the fields. He received what education he could in the log cabin 
schools of his community. He was married in March, 1872, to Frances 
Ewers, who was born in Perry township, RBchland county, Ohio, November 
23, 1848, the daughter of David G. and Almina (Johnson) Ewers. David G. 
Ewers was a son of Robert and Martha (Gregg) Ewers, who eloped in 
youth and were married in the middle of the Potomac river. She was a 
worthy representative of the Gregg family, who underwent the hardships 
incident to the memorable siege of Londonderry, Ireland, and the blood of 
her Presbyterian Scotch-Irish ancestry made her a strong character. The 
Ewers family was prominent in the locality where the members of the same 
lived. Robert Ewers was the son of John and Sarah (Gladden) Ewers, of 
Loudoun county, Virginia. The ancestry of this family is traced back to 
the Norman conquest. The early emigrant's of the Ewers family first settled 
on the banks of the Delaware river, near Philadelphia. Their property was 
later destroyed by the British and they moved to Virginia. Besides Robert 
Ewers and his brother David, who came to Knox county, Ohio, in 1812, 
Richard and Jonathan soon followed, all of whom lived to an advanced age 
and all are buried in the Friends cemetery on Qwl creek. Robert settled in 
the northern part of Middlebury township, where he lived and died and 
where he became prosperous, owning upwards of one thousand acres of good 
land. His children were George Washington, John William, Davrd Robert, 
Thomas, Mariah (who became Mrs. William Bigbee) and Martha (who 
married W. S. Files). There are no survivors. Almina Johnson, the mother 



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774 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

of Mrs. Caywood, wife of the subject, was a daughter of Squire James and 
Abigail (Richardson) Johnson. Mr. Johnson served for nearly a half cen- 
tury as justice of the peace He first settled in Wayne township, Knox 
county, in 1813. Much of their later life was spent with their daughter, 
Mrs. Caywood, where they died, he at the age of seventy-two and she at the 
age of seventy-six years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leander Caywood began married life on a farm in Mid- 
dlebury township, where they continued to live until 1907, successfully en- 
gaged in general farming and stock raising; in that year they moved to 
Fredericktown. By judicious management and the exercise of sound judg- 
ment and honest business principles, Mr. Caywood prospered, became a large 
land owner and his was one of the finest and most desirable farms in Knox 
county. He always believed in employing the latest methods in agricultural 
pursuits and in keeping fully abreast of the times. He studied the soils, 
grains, crop rotation, fertilization and all phases of his work so as to get 
the largest results for the least outlay of labor. He kept his land under a 
high state of cultivation and improvement, kept the most approved modern 
machinery and his buildings were always in order. He has devoted much 
attention to the raising and breeding of live stock, being an excellent judge 
of the same; in fact, it is doubtful if any man in this locality has done more 
to improve the breed of cattle. For many years he made a specialty of 
breeding Polled EHirham cattle and his Klokosing herd of Polled Durhams 
were widely and favorably known among breeders everywhere, and many 
excellent animals have gone from this herd to improve the country's live 
stock in many states. 

Mr. Caywood was one of the promoters and charter members of the 
American Polled Durham Breeders' Association, organized at Chicago, No- 
vember 18, 1890, and he was a member of the first board of directors. His 
herd was a prize winner wherever exhibited, and single animals brought 
fancy prices. He was a recognized leader among cattle breeders, as he was 
a model farmer among farmers. Mr. Caywood sold his fine herds when he 
moved to Fredericktown in 1907, and has since lived a retired life, having 
accumulated a competency. He retained one of his excellent fanns and has 
looked after this in a general way. 

Politically, Mr. Caywood has always been a Republican and active in 
party and public matters. He was justice of the peace for twenty years, 
during which time he discharged the duties of this office in a manner that 
brought much credit to himself and won the confidence and hearty com- 
mendation of all concerned, his decisions l>eing characterized by fairness and 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 775 

a rare knowledge of justice and jurisprudence, and they seldom met with 
reversal at the hands of a higher tribunal. In the language of Shakespeare, 
this honor was literally **thrust upon him," for he never sought office of any 
kind in his life. Besides being justice of the peace he served as township 
assessor and treasurer on several occasions, and also as a member of the 
school board for years. He has been a frequent delegate to county, district 
and state conventions. Fraternally, he is a charter member of the Middle- 
bury Grange No. 192, Patrons of Husbandry. He belongs to Jacob Young 
Post No 539, Grand Army of the Republic, being the present commander of 
the post, and he has been a frequent delegate to state and national encamp- 
ments. He is a member of the National Association of Civil War Musicians. 
He has traveled extensively and spent the winter of 1910 and 191 1 in 
Florida. He is a man of high standards and wide influence. 

Mrs. Cay wood was called to her rest on March 29, 1909. She was a 
woman of commendable attributes and estimable disposition, a favorite with 
a host of friends. Strong-minded, progressive and of humanitarian ideas, she 
was a potent influence for good in her community and a fit helpmeet for 
such a gentleman as the subject, no small part of his success being attribut- 
able, no doubt, to her sympathy and encouragement. She attended school in 
the old log school house and later walked two miles to Fredericktown to 
school and was finally engaged as a teacher in the schools here 



CHARLES A. YOUNG. 

Charles A., Young was born on May 10, 1827, in Fayette county, Penn- 
sylvania. He is the son of Hubbell and Rachael (Shipley) Young. This 
family came to Knox county, Ohio, about 1833, ^^^ located on a farm one 
mile northeast of the farm whereon the family lived so long at a later day. 
They became well known and influential in that remote pioneer period and 
were among the county's substantial citizens. 

Charles A. Young grew up on the home farm and when but a boy he 
knew the meaning of hard work, for in developing a farm from the primeval 
forests in those times the labor of all the family was required. His father set- 
tled in the woods and started life- here in a log cabin which he erected, then 
cleared and developed the land into a good farm and finally had a comfortable 
home. The subject received such education as those early times afforded. 
Later he attended Sloan's Academy at Mt. Vernon. He was married on 

(50) 



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yy(d KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

December 28, 1858, to Angeline Annstrong, daughter of Eliphalet and Tacy 
(Irwin) Armstrong, a prominent old family of Mt. Vernon. To this union 
one son was born, Frank E. Young, who succeeds the father in the manage- 
ment of the estate. 

Charles A. Young after his marriage began housekeeping on a part of 
the home farm, and there he lived for about seven years, when he purchased 
a farm one and one-half miles east of Mt. Vernon in Monroe township, his 
first purchase being one hundred and seventy acres. Here he prospered 
through good management, close application and honest dealings with his 
fellow men, and later added to his holding until he became the owner of 
four hundred and fift>^ acres of fine land, which he placed under excellent im- 
provements and a high state of cultivation. Here he carried on general 
farming and stock raising on an extensive scale for many years and became 
one of the substantial and most progressive farmers in this part of the 
county. Although he kept live stock of all kinds, he made a specialty raising 
sheep, keeping large flocks of good wool producers. 

Politically, Mr. Young was a Democrat and he was always active in 
public matters. He served two terms as county commissioner and was a 
most efficient and conscientious public servant. His support could always 
be depended upon in the furtherance of any movement having as its object 
the general good. He was a man of great activity and force of character 
and one of the most representative citizens of Knox county. He was a 
member of the Masonic order and the Congregational church, and he carried 
the sublime precepts of each into his every-day life. Mrs. Young is a Baptist 
in her religious faith. 



FRANK E. YOUNG. 



Frank E. Young was born on September 15, i860, on the home farm in 
Knox county, Ohio. He is the only child of Charles A. and Angeline (Arm- 
strong) Young, the father born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, May 10, 
1827, and his death occurred on February 14, 1908, but the mother is still 
living, making her home on the old place with her son. The father became 
one of the substantial and well known farmers of Knox county, and farmed 
on a large scale and handled large numbers of live stock from year to year, 
devoting his entire life to farming, making sheep raising a specialty. He 
was an influential factor in public aflFairs and a loyal Democrat, and he was 
active in the Masonic order and the Congregational church, a good and use- 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. Tjy 

fill man, whom the community will miss for many years to come. A com- 
plete sketch of him appears on another page. 

Frank Young was married on November 26, 1884, to Nannie M. Mer- 
rin, daughter of George and Lodema (Irwin) Merrin, a prominent family 
of Morris township, this county, where Mr. Merrin has a valuable farm, and 
there Mrs. Young grew to womanhood and she received her education in the 
country and Mt. Vernon high schools. 

Tw^o daughters have graced the union of Mr. and Mrs. Young, namely : 
Florence M. and Mabel I., both educated at Oberlin College, where they 
made excellent records, and they have always been popular in local social 
circles. 

Politically, Mr. Young is a Democrat, and while he takes the interest of 
a good citizen in public affairs and his support may always be depended upon 
in furthering any worthy cause, he is not a seeker after public favors or the 
emoluments of offices within the gift of the people, preferrrng to devote his 
exclusive interests to the home farm. Mrs. Young and daughters are mem- 
bers of the Congregational church of Mt. Vernon. 



IRVEN SEVITS. 



One of the farmers of Union township who has by his industry and 
good management reached a stage of comfortable circumstances is Irven 
Sevits. What is meant by comfortable circumstances does not only include 
material well-being, but also time for recreation and culture, and some lib- 
erty to travel. When the individual has reached this condition he is prepared 
to enjoy life and needs no money. But a great many people have reached 
various stages of this condition and in that proportion are happy. Most peo- 
ple imagine their troubles. It is now well known that the state of the mind 
has everything to do with the state of the temper. When one can reduce 
existence to the happy state of Mr. Sevits, he is prepared to enjoy a consid- 
erable degree of happiness. It requires a philosophic mind to be able to do 
this. He is yet a young man, and his greatest pleasure is not in idleness, but 
in its antithesis — work; he has never found labor and the every-day duties 
of life irksome, and although he is far from being a rich man he has suffi- 
cient of this world's goods to make him, or that should make any fair-minded 
man, content with their lot. Many millionaires are most unhappy, which 
goes to show that there are other things in life besides dollars. 



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778 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Irven Sevits was born on March 7, 1871, on the farm in Union town- 
ship, one mile south of Brinkhaven. He is the son of William and Jane 
(Workman) Sevits. The father was born in Somerset county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and the mother in Coshocton county, Ohio. The father came to 
Knox county in 1867, when he was twenty-three years old. He w^as married 
soon afterwards and settled in Tiverton township, Coshocton county, but 
soon afterwards he moved to Union township, Knox county. Early in life 
he followed railroading, but later tjimed his attention to farming. He is 
still living in Union township. His wife died in December, 1903. To Mr. 
and Mrs. William Sevits were born two sons and two daughters, namely: 
Stephen, who lives in Union township; Irven, of this sketch; Selena mar- 
ried Bur. Haugher, of Howard township; Alice married William Edwards, 
and lives in New Comerstown. The father was a life-long Republican 
and a member of the Disciples church, highly respected and a useful citizen. 

Irven Sevits, of this review, was reared on the home farm and educated 
in the district schools. During his boyhood days he assisted with the gen- 
eral work about the place and has always followed farming pursuits. 

Mr. Sevits was married* on April 26, 1884, to Ida Wolf, daughter of 
Adam and Fanny (Butler) Wolf, of Union township, and to this union two 
sons and one daughter were born, namely : Everett, William A. and Mary 
P., all living at home. 

Mr. Sevits after his marriage engaged in farming in Union township, 
and in 1904 he bought and moved to his present farm near where he was 
bom, the place consisting of one hundred and seventy-five acres. He has 
plaosd this rich, productive land under a high state of improvement and cul- 
tivation, and here carries on general farming and stock raising successfully, 
specializing on thoroughbred Guernsey cattle, of which he has a fine herd. 
He also raises this kind of stock for breeding purposes, and he has a wide 
reputation as a result of his fine stock. Owing to their superior quality they 
find a very ready market when offered for sale. He is an excellent judge 
of live stock and knows well how to care for them so as to get the best re- 
sults. He also keeps high-grade horses, preferring Percherons, and at the 
exhibits over the country he usually takes first premiums, having frequently 
won blue ribbons at county fairs. He also handles high-grade Delaine sheep. 
He believes in keeping the best grades of all kinds of stock, and no small 
portion of his annual income is derived from this source. His name has 
gone throughout the state as a result of his fine live stock. He believes in 
employing up-to-date methods in his stock raising and farming, and is one 
of the progressive and substantial men of his township and county. He 



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^ KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 779 

takes a great interest in agricultural fairs, and he is a member of the board 
of directors and active in its operations ; in fact, no small part of its success 
has been due to his efforts. 

Politically, Mr. Sevits is a Republican and he has long, been active and 
influential in public matters. He has served as a member of the township 
board of education, being still a member. In the fall of 191 1 he was elected 
one of the trustees of Union township. He is always among the foremost 
of those who advocate progressive measures in all things. He belongs to 
the Danville Grange, Patrons of Husbandry, being a charter member of the 
Grange. Religiously, he belongs to the Baptist church, and his wife and 
children are members of the Disciples church of Danville. He is a trustee 
and a liberal supporter of the church in which he holds membership; in fact, 
the entire family is active in church and Sunday school work, and is promi- 
nent in the social life of the neighborhood. 



JOSEPH McMillan. 

Among the successful farmers and stock men of Union township and a 
descendant of one of the sterling pioneer families of Knox county is Joseph 
McMillan. Having grown up on a farm and handled stock all his life, he is 
familiar with that class of husbandry. It requires something more than 
carelessness to select the best animals in any herd and to rear them in such 
a manner that the best points will be brought out and emphasized. As the 
best stock brings the best price, the most skillful farmers make it an object 
to raise the higher grades, knowing that the market will be the better for a 
given effort and outlay. All these important points are borne in mind by all 
good stock raisers. Then there are the questions of feeding, watering, salt- 
ing, stables and the best time of marketing the animals. It is true that the 
best farmers study the market quotations of stock in the principal cities, and 
by so doing very often receive the reward of their watchfulness in a much 
more satisfactory price for their products. This is true of the grain pro- 
ducers, as well as those of the yards. One of the farmers and stock men of 
this locality who thus manages to get the best stock and the best prices is Mr. 
McMillan. 

The subject of this sketch was born on March 17, 1862, on a farm in 
Union township, this county, and he has always lived in this vicinity. He 
is the son of Ephraim and Elizabeth (Cline) McMillan, the father born 



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780 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. • 

July 18, 1829, on the same farm where the subject was born. The mother's 
birth occurred on June 23, 1833, in the state of Xew^ York. Grandfather 
Ephraim McMillan came from Washington county, Pennsylvania, in the 
fall of 1806, aitd settled on the farm where his son, Ephriam, father of the 
subject, w^as born, lived and died, and here he began life as a pioneer, when 
the country was a wilderness and Indians and all kinds of wild game were 
in abundance. Here he built a log cabin, made a clearing and by dint of 
hard w-ork had a good home and a good farm. He underw^ent the hardships 
and privations incident to the life of a first settler. He became prominent in 
the county and was highly regarded. His wife was known in her maiden- 
hood as Matilda Winteringer, representing another pioneer family, of about 
1810, These families were active in business, public and church and school 
affairs. They w^ere the organizers of the Presbyterian church in Millwood. 

Elizabeth Cline, mother of the subject, was of German descent, her family 
having first settled in the state of New York, and from there came to Union 
township, Knox county, in 1840. The subject's father became well-to-do 
here, and was one of the large land owners of this locality, and was a great 
sheep raiser. He was a Republican in politics and was always active in pub- 
lic affairs. He filled the various township offices, and was a member of the 
Presbyterian church. His death occurred on May 24, 1903, at an advanced 
age. His widow still lives on the old home farm. They were the parents of 
twelve children, four sons and eight daughters, eleven of whom are living, 
namely: Matilda, who has remained single; Angeline is also unmarried; 
Sarah C. married Alexander H. Parmenter, of Lincoln, Nebraska; Robert 
lives in Union township; Columbus Delano died March 15, 1910; Joseph, of 
this review; Edith married Robert Neiderhoiiser, of Union township; Emma 
married Harry C. Whitney in Union township; Salora married Samuel 
Neiderhouser, of Union township; Alice is single; George lives in Union 
township; Ida married C. B. Workman, of Buckeye City. 

Joseph McMillan was reared on the home farm and w^as educated in the 
common schools of his township. He remained with his parents on the 
home farm until he was married, on June 23, 1887, to Ida J. Workman, 
daughter of Hiram B. and Isabelle (Parmenter) Workman, a well known 
family of Union tow^nship, whither they came from Coshocton county, this 
state. 

After his marriage the subject farmed for one year on the home farm, 
then moved to his present farm, two miles southeast, in Union township, 
and here he has been very successful as a general farmer and stock raiser. 
He makes a specialty of thoroughbred Delaine sheep, and has a great repu- 



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KNOX COUNTY^ OHIO. 781 

tation throughout this part of the state for his fine animals. No better judge 
of Hve stock could be found in Knox county, and he takes a delight in handling 
them. His farm consists of one hundred and seventeen acres, well improved 
and under a high state of cultivation. He has a modern home, large bams 
and stock sheds and is well fixed to carry on his business in a modern 
manner. 

Three sons have been born to Mr. and Mrs. McMillan, namely : Chester 
E., who is a graduate of the Danville high school, is now a student in Ken- 
yon College; Arthur H. and Ralph W. are students in the local high school. 

Politically, the subject is a Republican, and he has been township trustee 
for six years. In 1910 he was land appraiser in his township As a public 
servant he has been most faithful in the performance of his duty. He and 
his family are members of the Disciples church, and he has long l^een active 
in church and Sunday school work, as are also the members of his family. 
They are well known and stand high in the social circles of this part of the 
count v. 



JOHN H. BONE. 



One of the evidences of the excellent opportunities for a livelihood and 
for a pleasant place to reside furnished by Knox county is the noticeable 
fact that so many of her present day citizens were born here and have spent 
their lives within her borders. No other country has been alluring enough 
to induce them to leave it, for they seem to have early been impressed with 
the fact that none other offered better, if as good, opportunities as were 
wuthin their grasp right at their ow^n thresholds. One of these w^orthy citi- 
zens is John H. Bone, a successful agriculturist and stock man of Pleasant 
township, who was formerly one of the county's best known educators. In 
all the relations of life he has proven himself to be a man of progressive 
ideas and correct principles, and he has always enjoyed the confidence and 
friendship of a w ide acquaintance. 

Mr. Bone was born on January 15, 1859, ^^ Miller township, this 
county, and he is the son of Moses C. and Martha (White) Bone, the father 
a native of Cornwall, England, his birth having occurred there on May 11, 
1833. He was the son of John and Mary Ann (Cohvell) Bone. Moses C. 
Bone grew to maturity in his native land and emigrated to America when 
twenty-one years of age, first settling in Gambier, Knox count}% Ohio, where 
he worked at his trade of wagon-maker. From there he went to Lock, Ohio. 



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782 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Two years later he moved to Miller township, this county, and engaged in 
farming, and there he still lives, his wife having died March 16, 1906, aged 
sixty-seven years, four months and seven days. He has been very successful 
here, and is a large land holder, being regarded as one of the foremost 
farmers of the county. He keeps his land well improved and tilled in the 
most up-to-date manner. There were nine children in his family, namely: 
John H., of this revie\v, is the eldest; Lovilla C, bom August 6, i860; Bur- 
nello M., born February 29, 1864, died December 29, 1875; Mary Jane, bom 
August II, 1866; Frank E., born July 23. 1868: Alta A., bom April 29, 
1871 ; Charles C, born April 17, 1873; Anna Delle, bom February 12, 1875; 
Martha A., born September 20, 1878. 

The father of these children is a I>emocrat and is always keenly inter- 
ested in public matters. He served six years as a member oiF the board of 
county infirmary directors. He is a member of the Christian church at Fair- 
view. He has always borne an exemplary reputation, and is a whole-souled, 
strong-minded gentleman whom to know is to admire. 

The son, John H., of this sketch, spent his childhood and youth on the 
home farm and attended the country district schools, later went to the 
normal school at Utica, Ohio; also went to school at Lebanon, this state. 
He was a diligent searcher after knowledge and became well educated. He 
began his career as a teacher, which profession he followed with ever- 
increasing success for a period of eight years. 

Mr. Bone has been twice married, first on May 9, 1883, to Elizabeth 
Berger, daughter of Philip and Elizabeth (Wheeler) Berger, of Knox 
county. Nine children were born to this union, namely: J. Milton is mar- 
ried and lives in Wayne township: Ethel E. married Leonard F. Dennison, 
of Utica; Jessie E. and Mary B. are both teachers; Lucy E., John G., Ralph 
L., Helen S. and Gladys E. are deceased. The wife and mother passed to 
her rest on July 19, 1902. 

Mr. Bone's second marriage was solemnized on February 23, 1905, to 
Viola L Martin, daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Miller) Martin, of 
Crawford county, Ohio. One child, Goldeth M., born to this union, died in 
infancy. 

After his marriage Mr. Bone lived three years on a farm belonging to 
his father, in Miller township. He then bought his present farm in Pleasant 
township and moved thereto. Here he has been very successful as a gen- 
eral farmer and stock raiser, making a specialty of handling sheep. He 
keeps his place well improved and under a high state of cultivation. He is 
one of the leading citizens of his township in every respect. Politically, he 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 783 

is a Democrat and takes an abiding interest in public affairs and is thor- 
oughly informed on current topics. He has served as township trustee, 
township treasurer and as a member of the local school board. He has been 
a valued friend to education and is an avowed temperance man Fraternally, 
he is a member of Pleasant Grange No. 677, Patrons of Husbandry, and he 
has been active in the affairs of the grange. He is a member of the Fair- 
view Christian church, having been affiliated with the same since he was 
about fifteen years of age. He is a meml>er of the official church board and is 
active in church and Sunday school work. He is a man of fine mind and 
instincts, and always stands stanchly for what he believes to l>e right and 
what will make for the general good. 



WILLIAM HAYES MITCHELL. 

At this point we are permitted to touch upon the life history of one 
who, if for no other reason, merits recognition of his lifelong residence in 
Mil ford township and a representative of one of the sterling old families of 
Knox county. But superadded to this circumstances are others which render 
the appearance of this biography within these pages all the more consistent, 
for he attained a position of prominence in connection with the business 
activities of his community, and was honored as one of the upright, genial 
and reliable citizens, his home life being the center of a cordial hospitality. 

William Hayes Mitchell was bom in Milford township, this county, 
January 3, 1854, the son of Almon Mitchell and wife, a well known family 
of this county, a complete sketch of whom is to be found on another page 
of this work. 

William H. Mitchell was educated in the township schools and reared 
on the home farm. In 1872 he was married, and then entered the mercantile 
business with his father-in-law at Lock, continuing the business alone after 
the death of his partner. He remained in this life of endeavor in all about 
thirty-seven years. His father-in-law had begun the business in 1854 and 
the family still conduct the store. 

Politically, Mr. Mitchell was a Republican and served as township treas- 
urer for a period of nineteen years, this certainly being evidence of his good 
standing in his locality, and he made a most faithful and efficient public 
servant. Both he and Mrs. Mitchell belonged to the Congregational church 
at Lock. Fraternally, he belongs to the Centerburg lodge of Free and Ac- 



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784 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

cepted Masons; he was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
at the same place. 

Mr. Mitchell was married in 1872 to Ida Hildreth, who was born in 
Lock, this county, on September 2, 1856. She is the daughter of Washing- 
ton and Harriet Hildreth. The father was bom in New York and the 
mother in Delaware county, Ohio, in 1836. The father came to Ohio with 
his parents when a boy, but he lived with the Delano family for a number 
of years. He was the son of Minor and Nancy Hildreth, of New York. 
She died young and his father re-married. Mrs. Mitchell's mother, who was 
born in Delaware county, later moved to Brandon, Knox county, thence to 
Lock, where her death occurred. 

Washington Hildreth was a merchant, having begun his career at 
Brandon in 1853, coming to Lock a year later, and he enjoyed a liberal trade 
there. In early life he taught school, later he clerked and then went into 
business for himself, and was successful all along the line. He was a public- 
spirited citizen and influential in his community, a man of exemplary habits 
and many warm friends. For about thirty years he served as postinaster at 
the town of Lock, giving eminent satisfaction to the department and to the 
people. Mr. Mitchell, the subject of this sketch, followed him as the in- 
cumbent of that office. The death of Mr. Hildreth occurred in Janu- 
ary, 1902. 

Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell, named as follows: 
Winnifred Estelle, wife of Eugene Cornell; Minnie Belle, wife of C. C. 
Jackson ; Hattie May, who lives at home ; Anna -Laura, who died in infancy ; 
Arthur Hildreth married Mabel E. Hess, both of whom were graduated 
from the Mt. Vernon high school in 1905; Laurence Washington, who mar- 
ried Mildred McManus, is managing the store; Almon Maurice is a student in 
the Mt. Vernon high school. William H. Mitchell died January 30, 1910, after 
a short illness. He is survived by hi& wife, three daughters and three sons. 



ELMER T. BROWN. 



The great task of clearing the land of its timber in early years can 
scarcely be realized by the people of today. Not a crop could be sown nor 
an orchard tree planted until the large trees, the patriarchs of the forest 
primeval, had been cut down and removed with fire or with a team of oxen 
or horses. Even then the stumps were a great hindrance, and it is doubtful 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 785 

if SO much as a half crop could be raised until they had been gotten rid of in 
some manner. The amount of hard labor required to remove the timber 
seems almost incredible. It was a task that seemed never to end, and all 
members of the family were required to assist early and late and at all sea- 
sons of the year. The ancestors of Elmer J. Brown had their full share of 
this work, for they invaded Knox county when it was still wild and the home 
of the Indian and various species of wild beasts; but they were men of ster- 
ling traits and never permitted obstacles to thwart them in their purposes, 
undergoing the hardships and privations incident to the life of a first settler 
in such a wilderness without a murmur and here carving out good farms 
and did their full share in the early development of the county, and their 
descendants have carried on most admirably the work that they inaugurated 
here. 

Elmer J. Brown was born on October 20, 1865, in Wayne township, 
this county, and spent most of his life in Monroe and Pleasant townships. 
He is the son of Joseph and Anna (Scott) Brown, both also natives of this 
county. Grandfather William Brown came from Maryland to this county 
in the early pioneer days, where he established his home. The father of the 
subject was born and grew up to manhood in Monroe township, and he spent 
his life here engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1890, when he went to 
Effingham county, Illinois, and there engaged in farming. The mother of 
the subject died when he was a small boy. A brother of the subject, Harry 
M., is a dentist in Elwood, Indiana, and a sister, Mary E., is a professional 
nurse in Indianapolis, Indiana, the subject having been third in order of 
birth in this family. 

Elmer J. Brown spent his youth on the farm, and he attended the district 
schools and later the Northern University at Ada, Ohio, taking the teacher's 
course. Thus well prepared for his chosen profession, he taught for a period 
of fifteen years in the public schools of Knox county, and became one of the 
leading educators of the county, his services being in g^eat demand. His 
teaching was principally in Monroe and Pleasant townships. He also en- 
gaged some in farming during that period. 

Mr. Brown was married on June 6, 1891, to Jennie C. Sellers, daughter 
of Frank and Frances (Durbin) Sellers, of Knox county, and this union has 
resulted in the brith of five sons, namely : Sterl C, a graduate of the Gam- 
bier high school of the class of 1910. He has prepared himself for a teacher. 
Ray. who is attending high school at Gambier; Paul C, Carl S. and Lloyd. 

Mr. Brown has lived on a farm since his marriage, and in 1897 he gave 
up teaching and devoted his exclusive attention to general farming, making 



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786 KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 

a specialty of raising potatoes and chickens, making a great success with 
both. He has sixty-two acres of finely improved and productive land. He 
farms on the '^intensive'* plan, and employs the most advanced methods in 
all his work. 

Politically, Mr. Brown is a Democrat and a member of the school board 
in Pleasant township. He has been a frequent delegate to county, district 
and state conventions. He and his family belong to the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and he is a trustee and steward in the church and active in church 
and Sunday school work. Personally, he is a broad-minded, well educated 
and obliging gentleman, indorsing all movements having as their object the 
general improvement of his locality along all lines. 



ISAIAH H. FRIZZELL. 

One of tlie best known contractors of Knox county is Isaiah H. Frizzell, 
of Fredericktown, who, during the many years that he has honored this 
locality by his residence, has shown himself to be a gentleman of exemplary 
habits, public spirit and industry; who has, while advancing his own inter- 
ests, done much toward promulgating the civic, industrial and moral tone of 
the vicinity. He is a thoroughly practical business man, w^hich fact, coupled 
with his undoubted ability to seize an opportunity readily and make the most 
of it, contains the secret of his success. 

Mr. Frizzell was bom on January 22, 1855, in Franklin township. Mor- 
row county, Ohio. He is the son of William H. and Catherine (Hutchison) 
Frizzell. both natives of Virginia, the father born in Loudoun county and 
the mother in Fauquier county. They grew up in the Old Dominion and 
were married there. About 1846 they made the trip over the mountains in 
wagons to Ohio, settling on a farm in Middlebury township, Knox county, 
moving to Morrow county, this state, in a later year, where he spent the 
remainder of his life, successfully engaged in farming. He enlisted in the 
Union army early in the Civil war, but before he could be mustered into 
service he was attacked by typhoid fever and died on March 2, 1862. His 
widow survived thirty-six years, dying in June, 1896. 

John Follin, maternal great-grandfather of the subject, was a soldier in 
the Revolutionary war, and the father of thirty children, some of whom 
lived until comparatively recent years. He was a Virginia slaveholder. His 
remains were originally buried in the cemetery at Vienna, Virginia, later 
being removed to Arlington cemetery at Washington, D. C. 



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KNOX COUNTY, OHIO. 787 

Isaiah H. Frizzell spent his youth on the home farm, where he assisted 
with the general work on the place, attending the district schools in the 
winter time, following farming until he was nineteen years old. Having 
long fostered an ambition to be a builder, he began the carpenter's trade, 
when he attained the age mentioned, in Morrow county, later coming to 
Knox county on various jobs, soon building up an extensive business. He 
built most of the best residences and farm buildings in the northern section 
of Knox county, doing a vast amount of work in Fredericktown. So much 
of his work being in Knox county, he moved to Fredericktown in 1891, 
and here he has since resided. In Januar\% 1892, he turned his attention to 
the hardware business, in w^hich he met with equally encouraging success, 
in Fredericktown, becoming a partner of Henry Cassell, who had previously 
been in this line of business for a number of years. Mr. Frizzell continued 
successfully in the hardware business until 1909, having built up a large and 
ever-growing trade with. the surrounding country and carrying a large and 
up-to-date stock of goods. Retiring from this line of endeavor in the year 
1909, he resumed contracting and building, which he still continues. 

Mr. Frizzell was married on September 26, 1877, to Ida T. Ackerman, 
daughter of Morgan and Julia (Reed) Ackerman, of Knox county, in Mid- 
dlebury township, where Mr. Ackerman engaged in farming. He and his 
wife are both now deceased. 

One son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Frizzell, also three daughters, all 
living, named as follows: Maynard, of Mt. Gilead, Ohio; Alice married 
Orin C. Buckmaster, of Fredericktown; Grace married Karl R. Coyner, of 
Mt. Vernon; Ida married Frank Dalrymple, chief clerk of the Baltimore & 
Ohio railroad at Fredericktown. 

Politically, Mr. Frizzell has always been a Republican and has long been 
active in party affairs. His first presidential vote was for Rutherford B. 
Hayes in 1876, and he has been voting the Republican ticket ever since. For 
many years he served on the board of education in Morrow c